Tag Archives: scandinavian

Zesty Prawn Crispbread Pizza

September 14, 2017 | Leave a comment

Prawn Pizza With Zesty Gremolata

A fresh and zingy pizza with plenty of flavour from fresh herbs, lemon zest, a mix of cheeses and fresh prawns.

  • 8 pieces Leksands triangle crispbread (or 1 round)
  • 100ml tomato sauce
  • 1 small onion + butter/oil for frying
  • 50ml ricotta
  • handful finely chopped basil
  • 60g mozzarella
  • Big handful grated cheese (e.g. Vasterbotten)
  • 2 handfuls finely chopped parsley, zest from 1 small lemon, 1 garlic clove grated – mixed to a Gremolata
  • Big handful peeled prawns
  • Seasalt and black pepper

1. Pre-heat oven to 225 degrees celsius.
2. Finely chop onion and fry in a bit of butter until soft – add sugar and let caramelise. Season with salt & pepper.
3. Spread the tomato sauce over the base. Add the onion, basil and ricotta – finish with the mozzarella and grated cheese.

Bake for 10 mins or until the cheese is bubbly and slightly golden. Top with prawns and gremolata – serve immediately.

Enjoy!

—–

Zesty Prawn Pizza

Thanks to our friends at Leksands for the recipe – just mildly adapted for a UK kitchen.

Bacon & Mushroom Pizza

September 9, 2017 | Leave a comment

Crispbread Pizza With Bacon & Mushroom

Autumn in Scandinavia means foraging – for berries, fruits and mushrooms – so seasonal dishes often centre, or include, around these ingredients. Mushrooms are a favourite – especially the more elusive girolles (chantarelles). The following recipe is adapted for supermarket foraging – but feel free to use any mushroom you like.

  • 1 round Leksands crispbread
  • 100ml tomato sauce
  • 1 small onion + butter/oil for frying
  • 75g oyster mushroom
  • 1 garlic clove
  • 50g bacon or pancetta, fried until crispy
  • 1 egg yolk
  • 60g mozzarella + big handful grated cheddar
  • rocket salad to serve
  • Seasalt and freshly ground black pepper

1. Pre-heat oven to 225 degrees celsius.
2. Finely chop onion and fry in a bit of butter until soft – add pinch of sugar and let caramelise. Season with salt & pepper.
3. Chop the mushroom and fry until golden.
4. Spread the tomato sauce over the base. Add the onion, mushroom and your meat – finish with the mozzarella and grated cheese. Season with salt and pepper.

Bake for 10 mins or until the cheese is bubbly and slightly golden. Top with whisked egg yolk and rocket salad – serve immediately.

Enjoy!

—–

Bacon & Mushroom Pizza

Thanks to our friends at Leksands for the recipe – just mildly adapted for a UK kitchen.

7 Random Crispy Facts

September 7, 2017 | Leave a comment

7 Random Facts About Crispbread

  1. Crispbread is common across Scandinavia, but especially so in Sweden, followed closely by Norway. 85% of all Swedish households have it at all times.
  2. Crispbread is Sweden’s second largest export – second only to Absolut vodka.
  3. Your average Swedish munches through 5.5 kg of crispbread every year – and crispbread is amongst the most missed food products for Swedes abroad. It may not sound much, but considering an average crispbread weighs about 12 grams, this equates to 458 slices every year. A crispbread a day keeps the doctor away.
  4. What.. IS crispbread? Crispbread is traditionally made with only wholegrain rye, yeast, salt and water, although these days you have a wide range of variety ranging from all-wheat to all nut and seed (to purist, these don’t count). However, when you say crispbread, most people will still think of your classic rye crispbread.
  5. In Scandinavia, crispbread is treated as any other type of bread. It can be topped with almost anything, and is a common part of breakfast, lunch, dinner or snacks in between.
  6. Super versatile, you can have crispbread at every meal. Crushed over a bowl of yoghurt, maybe with some berries, for a naturally low sugar, high fibre and delicious granola for breakfast; topped with smoked salmon and cream cheese for lunch; used as pizza base for dinner (oh yes, crispbread pizza is a thing and it’s delicious. In Sweden you can even buy ready made frozen crispbread pizzas).
  7. In the UK, crispbread is often thought about in one of two ways; 1; as a cracker for cheese or 2; diet food. This saddens our crispy Scandi hearts and tummies. Because; crispbread is absolutely great with cheese, and is definitely much better for you than mass produced wonderbread – but Scandis eat crispbread because it is tasty (and you can top it with anything you like), convenient (it keeps forever) and good for you. You could eat 4 triangles of crispbread for every slice of white bread – and thanks to the high fibre content you will stay fuller for a lot longer. Meaning you may be able to resist that cinnamon bun later. Or not. But that’s ok. Balancing your crispbread with cinnamon buns is what the Swedes would call ‘lagom’.

Now, pass us the crispbread someone. Fancy some? Find our crispbreads here.

Crispbread as base = pizza in 10 minutes.

Salmon & Dill Pizza

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Crispbread Pizza With Salmon & Dill

Hej hej, another quick and easy crispbread pizza recipe. This time flavoured with two Scandi staples – salmon and dill. Dillicious. By using a round of Leksands as your base you can have pizza in 12 minutes – and the mild rye flavour works really well with the salmon. An added bonus is, of course, that it is actually good for you! Win win win. Win.

You will need:

  • 1 round of Leksands crispbread OR 8 pieces Leksands triangle crispbread
  • 100ml tomato sauce
  • 1 small onion, chopped – plus butter or oil for frying
  • 75g hot smoked salmon
  • 60g mozzarella
  • Zest from 1/2 lemon
  • 1 tbsp browned butter
  • fresh dill
  • Freshly grated horseradish (from a jar will work in a pinch)
  • Good handful grated cheddar (or try it with Vasterbotten)
  • Sea salt & freshly ground pepper

1. Pre-heat oven to 225 degrees celsius.
2. Finely chop onion and fry in a bit of butter until soft – add a pinch of sugar and the garlic and let caramelise. Season with salt & pepper.
3. Spread the tomato sauce over the base. Add the onion and the salmon in smaller chunks – finish with the mozzarella and grated cheese. Season with pepper.

Bake for approximately 10 minutes until the cheese is bubbly and slightly golden. Top with lemon zest, grated horseradish and a drizzle of browned butter, if liked.

Enjoy!

—–

Salmon & Dill Pizza

Thanks to our friends at Leksands for the recipe – just mildly adapted for a UK kitchen.

You Know You’re Scandi When…

August 30, 2017 | Leave a comment

You know you’re Scandi when..

  1. You wouldn’t DREAM of drinking the water from the tap without letting it run for at least 5 seconds. Otherwise you end up with the ‘pipe-water’ that has been sitting there for hours. Eugh.tap water
  2. You automatically remove your shoes when you enter someone’s house.
  3. You happily drink a glass of milk with breakfast, lunch and your evening meal (no, not dinner – the one after – kveldsmat/aftensmad).mr melk milk glass
  4. You insist on having your sandwiches topless. Less bread, more delicious filling, what’s not to like?
  5. You think 11.30am is an acceptable time to have lunch.
  6. You hoard candles for autumn and winter and secretly can’t wait for the temp to drop so you can light all of them. Hygge!hygge candles
  7. You spend hours struggling with the correct level of politeness in emails. Scandinavians are direct – in spoken as well as written language. Pardon us whilst we work on our manners.
  8. You still think it’s weird that milk comes in plastic bottles and not in cardboard.paskekrim melkekartong norwegian Easter milk carton
  9. You wonder where the crispbread section and tube cheese section in the supermarket is.
  10. Your dream Friday night is staying in and relaxing in front of a film or TV show. Tacos for dinner, sweets and snacks after.Pick and mix fredagsmys fredagskos
  11. You own at least 3 pairs of knitted socks from your grandma.
  12. You think liquorice, especially the very salty kind, is delicious. In chocolate, with ice cream, in vodka.liquorice salmiakki lakris
  13. You own at least one weatherproof jacket.allvaersjakke-norwegian

7 Random Things About 17th May – Norway Day

May 11, 2017 | Leave a comment

7 Random Facts About 17th May – Norway Day

  1. Norway day – the 17th of May – is celebrated as it was the day Norway got its constitution, back in 1814.
    Norwegian Constitution 17 May

  2. It is the busiest day of the year for Norway’s king – a whole day of waving is intense.

  3. 17th May is the final day of ‘russetid’ – graduation time for students. 3 weeks of solid partying, all culminating on the morning of 17th May. 

  4. 17th of May is the day Norwegians eat the most ice cream (if it is sunny) – up to 10 times the average amount for a sunny spring day.
    iskrem norway day
  5. During WW2 it was forbidden to parade for 17th of May. It was also forbidden to wear the Norwegian flag’s colours on one’s clothes – contributing to its importance as a symbol of Norway’s freedom ever since.
    17 mai tog
  6. Marching bands are an important part of the parades – and marching band is the second most popular past time among Norwegian children (surpassed only by football).
    Korps marching band
  7. It is a national holiday, but since the 18th is not, the celebrations start early – Champagne breakfast at 7am is common, so you have time to eat and drink in time to watch the main parade starting around 10am (varies regionally).
    17 mai frokost

  8.  And an extra one – remember to say congratulations to every Norwegian you see.

7 Random Things You Didn’t Know About … Eurovision

May 4, 2017 | Leave a comment

 

7 facts about Eurovision

  1. Eurovision was set up as a way to unite people. I 1956, we were all to unite through song in Switzerland – and 7 countries took part. This year 42 countries will be competing (it was supposed to be 43, but Russia didn’t want to play) – looking to unite through sequins and glitz, animal costumes and wind machines.
    Eurovision 1956
  2. When ABBA won in 1974 with Waterloo, the UK gave them ‘nul points’
    abba smiles
  3. In 1969, there were 4 winners – that was before the tie-rule was introduced, so, United Kingdom, Spain, the Netherlands and France all won. Nice, right?
    Eurovision 1969 winners
  4. In 1958, Italy won with a song that you definitely know. Yes, you do. https://youtu.be/Z-DVi0ugelc
    Domenico Modugno Al Festival di Sanremo, nel 1959 (La presse)

    (La presse)

     

  5. Sweden has won Eurovision 6 times, Denmark and Norway have won 3 times, Norway has won twice and Finland just once. Iceland has never won.
    scandinavians rule eurovision
  6. Last year, 204 million people watched Eurovision. Yes, that is more viewers than even Eastenders.
    eastenders angry with eurovisison
  7. Youngest ever winner was Sandra Kim. She was 13 when she won in 1986. She had a good mullet.
    sandra kim 1986
    The oldest person ever to enter was 95, so no – it is not too late!

7 Nordic ways to talk about hangovers

April 28, 2017 | Leave a comment

Seven Nordic ways to talk about hangovers

‘Bagstiv’ is a Danish word for when you wake up the next morning, still drunk. Literally: Backwards drunk – in Sweden and Norway, its Bakfull and bakrus.

2. A drunk Dane might say he has a “Stick in ear” (en kæp i øret)

3. The Finnish word for hangover is “Krapula” 

4. The Old Norse Viking word for hangover was ‘kveis’, meaning “uneasiness after debauchery” 

5. In Denmark, if you drink a beer on a hang over, it is known as a Reperationsbajer – literally, a ‘repair beer’

6. In Danish, hangovers are known as Tømremænd  – literally, carpenters.

7. “Fylleangst” pronounced (foola angst) means “drunk anxiety” in Norway and is the unsettling feeling one has the day after drinking when you can’t remember what you did, how you acted or who may have seen you do it!

7 Scandi Ways To Screw Up

April 20, 2017 | Leave a comment

7 Scandi sayings for when things are not going well.

  1. If a Dane has his ass in the surface of the water (Røven i vandskorpen), it means things are not going well.

roven i vandskorpen dog

 

2. In Sweden, if you have made a real fool of yourself, people will tell you that ‘you have taken a shit in the blue cupboard’ (Nu har du skitit i det blå skåpet)

 

3. If you make a fool of yourself in Norway they might tell you that you “shat on your leg” (Nå har du bæsjet på leggen).

 

4. In Iceland, if someone says ‘peeing in your shoes will only keep you warm for a short while’ (“Það er skammgóður vermir að pissa í skó sinn”) they mean to tell you short term fixes don’t work.

 

5. If a Dane says you can both blow and have flour in your mouth, he means to say you can’t have your cake and eat it, too. (Man kan ikke både blæse og have mel i munden).

 

6. In Norway people might say you stomped in the piano if you mess up – ‘trampe i klaveret’.

trampe i klaveret mess up

 

7. If a Dane says ‘hot potato’ he could mean simply a hot potato – or he might also be referring to a tricky situation.

hot potato danish

7 Things You Didn’t Know About The Vikings

April 12, 2017 | Leave a comment

 

7 Useful Things To Know About the Vikings

 

    1. Viking Harold Bluetooth was great at connecting nations – Bluetooth tech is named after him: the logo are his initials.

    2. Erik the Red was so violent even fellow Vikings objected; exiling him from both Norway and Iceland (they made him to go Greenland).
      Eirik the red viking
    3. Viking is something you do, not something you are.The word Viking comes from the people from the Vik, (vik means bay). People who would sail off to other places were ‘going viking’. The word Viking wasn’t used in English until 19th Century – before this, we were just known as ‘Norsemen’ or ‘Danes’.
      Vik - viking
    4. The traditional Northern greeting “‘Ey up” comes from the Viking times
       

      northern ey up chips and gravy

      Not very viking but very northern.

       

    5. The Old Norse Viking word for drunk was ‘kveis’, meaning “uneasiness after debauchery”
      tired
    6. Viking women could ‘divorce’ their husbands quite easily – reasons included ‘the showing of too much chest hair”.
      viking woman
    7. The word Saturday in Scandinavia is ‘Lørdag’ which comes from the old Norse word laugardagr; a combination of the words  laug meaning ‘bath’ and dagr meaning ‘day’. The Vikings were very clean people (at least in comparison to many other nations) and had weekly baths.
      bathing viking
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