Tag Archives: svensk mat

Swedish Meatball Sandwich – Recipe

October 6, 2016 | Leave a comment

Swedish Meatballs With a Chance of Lingon

We love meatballs. Who doesn’t? A meatball a day keeps the doctor away, and so on.

Aside from the usual preparation, meatballs with creamy mash, cream sauce and sharp lingonberries (we have a lovely recipe for a meatball dinner here), we like eating them as a sandwich.

Here’s our simple Meatball Sandwich;

Swedish Meatball Sandwich Step by Step

  1. Start by cutting your meatballs into smaller chunks and fry them on medium heat in a little butter to make the edges go golden crisp, until they are warmed through. They’re already cooked so no need to cook them for very long.
  2. Then grab a plate and place 1 round polarbrod on it; we like it toasted but it doesn’t have to be. Spread a little salted butter on. Add a green leaf if you want. Spinach or rocket is good, or just plain lettuce. It adds a bit of freshness and crunch.
  3. Spread the beetroot salad on top your bread, approximately two tablespoons.
    Variation; Swap pickled red cabbage for the beetroot.
  4. Finish by adding your warm meatballs, some chopped chives and perhaps lingonberry jam, although we tend to think the sweetness from the beetroot salad is enough in this instance.
  5. Add a good sprinkling of salt and pepper to finish.

Sit down. Grab a knife and a fork and enjoy. ‘Mums filibaba’, as a Swede would say! (it means Yummy!).

Fancy making this? We have a bundle for you:

    Swedish Meatball Sandwich
    £6.60
    - +
    Per i Viken Farmors Köttbullar – Meatballs 8-Pack
    £2.80
    - +
    Felix Lingon – Wild Lingonberry Jam 283g
    £2.05
    - +

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Ways to eat Kalles Kaviar

February 26, 2015 | 1 Comment

The most popular item we sell, by miles, is Kalles Kaviar – a creamed cod roe spread from Sweden.

Yes, we know – it doesn’t sound so fancy to the person who hasn’t tasted it.  We are aware of this. But 9 million Swedes can’t be wrong. Oh, and Norwegians enjoy cod roe too… And all the other people in the world who are now addicted.

If you want to try it, we suggest adding it to your breakfast, as is the place you most often see Kalle’s Kaviar in Scandinavia (The Norwegian brand of same product is called Mill’s Kaviar, in case you were wondering).

Option 1: The Basic.

Crispbread, butter, sliced hardboiled egg, a neat squirt of kalle’s Kaviar. Done.

This is by far the most Swedish way to enjoy it. Utterly delicious. Highly recommend Leksands Crispbread for this.

Option 2: A bit fancier.

Toasted sourdough bread, smashed avocado, poached egg, squirt of Kalle’s Kaviar. Optional dill.

Fancier, requires a bit of prep – but really lovely.

Option 3: Extra Healthy

Dark, seeded rye bread, butter. Two boiled eggs, Kalles Kaviar squeezed out onto every bite of the egg.

Very traditional – and the dark rye bread is super good for you.

Keep your Kalle’s Kaviar in the fridge both before and after opening.

    Mills Kaviar – Smoked Cod Roe Paste 190g
    £4.50
    - +
    Abba Kalles Kaviar Original – Smoked Cod Roe 190g
    £3.20
    - +
    Leksands Brungraddat – Brown Baked Crispbread 830g
    £4.00
    - +
    Abba Kalles Kaviar Dill – Smoked Cod Roe Dill 190g
    £3.20
    - +

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Recipe: Lovely ‘Frasvåfflor’ waffles

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These beautiful heart shaped waffles are served all over Scandinavia. There are many different recipes (probably as many different recipes as there are people who make them).  In Norway, they tend to have a softer consistency – whereas in Sweden, they are crispy and eaten straight out of the waffle iron.

Norwegians love brown cheese on their waffles – and Swedes and Danes favour strawberries, strawberry jam and whipped cream. In the North of Sweden, the ultimate apres-ski treat are warm ‘frasvåfflor’ with a dollop of cream and a dollop of cloudberry jam. Absolutely delicious.

We also celebrate Waffle day at the end of March – so stay tuned for many more waffles ideas, offers and specials at the cafe.

This recipe is a more Swedish one – don’t make these in advance, as they only stay crispy for a little while. Serve with jam, cream or simply a dusting of icing sugar.

We don’t add sugar to this batter – but if you prefer a sweeter waffle, by all means do.

To make these, you need one of those fancy heart shaped waffle irons – we have found a link to a seller in the UK here 

Recipe: Lovely 'Frasvåfflor' waffles
 
Prep time
Cook time
Total time
 
Delicious cripsy heart shaped Frasvåfflor waffles - perfect for a winter afternoon. Serve with whipped cream and jam - or sliced brown cheese.
Author:
Recipe type: Treats
Cuisine: Swedish
Serves: 8
Ingredients
  • 100g butter
  • 180g flour
  • 2 tsp baking powder
  • 2 eggs
  • ½ tsp salt
  • 1 tsp vanilla sugar
  • Pinch ground cardamom (optional)
  • 200ml whole milk
  • 100ml sparkling water
Instructions
  1. Melt the butter and set aside to cool a bit.
  2. Whisk all ingredients together, add the butter. Continue to whisk until you have a smooth batter. Leave for 20-30 minutes before using (give it a stir before using).
  3. Heat up your waffle iron on a high setting. Add a ladle of batter and press down to make your first waffle. If it common knowledge that the first waffle never turns out well so don't worry about it.
  4. Once the waffle is golden brown, remove and serve immediately. Don't stack them or they will go soft really quickly.
  5. Serve with jam of your liking - we love cloudberry jam, strawberry and raspberry jam. Norwegians love sliced brown cheese on the warm waffles, too. Delicious.

    Den Gamle Fabrik Jordbær Marmelade – Strawberry Jam
    £3.30
    - +
    Lerums Utvalde Blåbærsyltetøy – Blueberry Jam 370g
    £4.00
    - +
    Lerums Utvalde Jordbærsyltetøy – Strawberry Jam 370g
    £3.60
    - +
    Felix Hjortronsylt – Cloudberry Jam 283g
    £6.25
    - +
    Toro Vafler – Waffle Mix 246g
    £3.00
    - +
    Tine Gudbrandsdalen Brunost – Brown Cheese 250g
    £4.30
    - +
    Tine Fløtemysost – Mild Brown Cheese 500g
    £8.65
    - +
    Ekströms Frasvåfflor – Waffle Mix 210g
    £1.45
    - +
    Tine Ekte Geitost – Brown Goat’s Cheese 500g
    £10.55
    - +

wafflefun

Recipe: How to make Senapssill Mustard herring

December 19, 2014 | Leave a comment

No Smörgåsbord is complete without the infamous pickled herring – and this herring dressing is as traditional as they come.

Serve the Mustard Herring with dark rye bread or crisp bread. Always serve herring at the beginning of the meal – along with a shot of chilled aquavit.

Recipe: How to make Senapssill Mustard herring
 
Prep time
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An essential component on any Nordic Smorgasbord.
Author:
Recipe type: Starter
Cuisine: Scandinavian
Serves: 4
Ingredients
  • Recipe Serves 4
  • 1 x 220g jar of plain pickled ABBA herring (or equivalent weight of a good plain ready pickled herring)
  • 1 tbsp white wine vinegar
  • 11⁄2 tbsp sunflower oil
  • 11⁄2 tbsp crème fraîche
  • 11⁄2 tbsp caster sugar
  • 1 tbsp Slotts Skånsk mustard (or grain mustard)
  • 1⁄2 tbsp Dijon mustard
  • 1⁄2 tbsp single cream
  • 1 tbsp mayonnaise
  • 1 shallot, very finely chopped
  • 2 tbsp chopped fresh dill
  • 2 tbsp chopped fresh chives
Instructions
  1. Drain the herring, discard onion bits and brine.
  2. In a bowl, mix all the dressing ingredients together. Whisk until the mixture is creamy and combined, then season to taste.
  3. Add the drained herring and marinate for a few hours.
  4. Enjoy with rye or crisp bread.

Shop our full range of Scandi food here 

Recipe: Lucia buns (Saffron buns)

December 3, 2014 | Leave a comment

Every December, Swedes travels to our shop from afar to get hold of saffron powder so they can make Lucia buns.  Saffron powder is ground saffron and gives off a very intense yellow colour and flavour.  If you cannot get hold of saffron powder, use strands but grind them slightly and infuse them in the milk before using to maximise the colour.

Saffron buns are eaten all throughout December – but mainly for the day of St Lucia on 13th December.

You can shape the buns into the traditional ‘S’ shape or even make a saffron plaited loaf.

Our Bronte is Danish and likes to cut her saffron bun open and spread with butter. All Swedes laugh at her in disbelief. She doesn’t care because it’s really really nice. But if you chose to do it, don’t tell the Swedes or they may deport you to Lapland or something.

Recipe: Lucia buns (Saffron buns / Lussekatter)
 
Prep time
Cook time
Total time
 
Author:
Serves: 12
Ingredients
  • Lucia Celebration Saffron buns
  • Ingredients
  • 50g fresh yeast
  • 1g saffron powder (2 sachets) (if using strands, grind and soak in the milk beforehand)
  • 400ml whole milk
  • 130g caster sugar
  • 200ml plain Quark or greek yoghurt (room temperature)
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 1 egg
  • 175g butter (soft and room temperature)
  • Approximately 700-800g plain bread flour such as – Vetemjöl or strong Canadian Bread Flour
  • Handful of raisins
  • Egg for brushing
Instructions
  1. Heat the milk to about 38°C. Add the yeast and milk to a mixer with a dough attachment. Mix until the yeast has dissolved, then add the saffron powder.
  2. Add the sugar, salt, quark and mix well. Begin to add the flour gradually while mixing, and egg. Add the softened butter. Keep adding flour until you have the right consistency. Keep mixing until you have a dough that is still sticky, but doesn’t stick to your finger too much when you poke it. Too much flour makes the saffron buns dry out quickly. If you’re using an electric mixer, leave it to knead for about 5 minutes, or knead by hand for 10 minutes. Leave the dough to rise until doubled in size.
  3. Knead by hand, using just enough flour that you’re able to work with the dough but it doesn’t stick. Add enough flour to make it so that you are just able to work with the dough in your hands. Cut the dough into around 24 equal-sized pieces. Roll each piece in your hand into a cylinder, then transfer to a lined baking tray and mould into an ‘S’ shape (see the picture). Add a single raisin to the centre of where the ‘S’ shape curves (two raisins for each bun) and leave to rise again for around 20 minutes.
  4. Preheat the oven to 200°c. then brush gently with egg and pop them in the hot oven for around 10-12 minutes. The buns should have a very slight tinge of brown on top, but not so much that it stops the nice yellow colour from showing. Turn down the heat a bit if you find the buns are getting too brown.
  5. Leave to cool under a damp tea towel (this prevents them from going dry) as soon as you take them out of the oven.
  6. Serve with coffee or glögg.
  7. These buns freeze well.

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