Tag Archives: svensk mat

Tricolore Mediterranean Crispbread Pizza

September 12, 2017 | Leave a comment

Crispbread Pizza ‘Tricolore’ With Mediterranean Flavours

Autumn in Scandinavia means foraging – for berries, fruits and mushrooms – so seasonal dishes often centre, or include, around these ingredients. Mushrooms are a favourite – especially the more elusive girolles (chantarelles). The following recipe is adapted for supermarket foraging – but feel free to use any mushroom you like.

  • 8 round Leksands crispbread
  • 100ml tomato sauce
  • 1 small onion + butter/oil for frying
  • 3-4 anchovy fillets in oil
  • 8-12 good quality black olives
  • 1 tbsp small capers
  • Finely chopped fresh chili (seeds removed)
  • 2 handfuls finely chopped parsley, zest from
  • 1 garlic clove grated
  • 4 cherry tomatoes, halved
  • 60g mozzarella + handful grated cheddar
  • Seasalt and black pepper, rocket to serve.

1. Pre-heat oven to 225 degrees celsius.
2. Finely chop onion and fry in a bit of butter until soft – add pinch of sugar and let caramelise. Season with salt & pepper.
3. Spread the tomato sauce over the base. Add the onion, chopped anchovies, olives, garlic, tomatoes and chili – finish with the mozzarella and grated cheese, season with pepper.

Bake for 10 mins or until the cheese is bubbly and slightly golden. Top with rocket and serve immediately.

Enjoy!

—–

Tricolore Pizza

Thanks to our friends at Leksands for the recipe – just mildly adapted for a UK kitchen.

7 Random Crispy Facts

September 7, 2017 | Leave a comment

7 Random Facts About Crispbread

  1. Crispbread is common across Scandinavia, but especially so in Sweden, followed closely by Norway. 85% of all Swedish households have it at all times.
  2. Crispbread is Sweden’s second largest export – second only to Absolut vodka.
  3. Your average Swedish munches through 5.5 kg of crispbread every year – and crispbread is amongst the most missed food products for Swedes abroad. It may not sound much, but considering an average crispbread weighs about 12 grams, this equates to 458 slices every year. A crispbread a day keeps the doctor away.
  4. What.. IS crispbread? Crispbread is traditionally made with only wholegrain rye, yeast, salt and water, although these days you have a wide range of variety ranging from all-wheat to all nut and seed (to purist, these don’t count). However, when you say crispbread, most people will still think of your classic rye crispbread.
  5. In Scandinavia, crispbread is treated as any other type of bread. It can be topped with almost anything, and is a common part of breakfast, lunch, dinner or snacks in between.
  6. Super versatile, you can have crispbread at every meal. Crushed over a bowl of yoghurt, maybe with some berries, for a naturally low sugar, high fibre and delicious granola for breakfast; topped with smoked salmon and cream cheese for lunch; used as pizza base for dinner (oh yes, crispbread pizza is a thing and it’s delicious. In Sweden you can even buy ready made frozen crispbread pizzas).
  7. In the UK, crispbread is often thought about in one of two ways; 1; as a cracker for cheese or 2; diet food. This saddens our crispy Scandi hearts and tummies. Because; crispbread is absolutely great with cheese, and is definitely much better for you than mass produced wonderbread – but Scandis eat crispbread because it is tasty (and you can top it with anything you like), convenient (it keeps forever) and good for you. You could eat 4 triangles of crispbread for every slice of white bread – and thanks to the high fibre content you will stay fuller for a lot longer. Meaning you may be able to resist that cinnamon bun later. Or not. But that’s ok. Balancing your crispbread with cinnamon buns is what the Swedes would call ‘lagom’.

Now, pass us the crispbread someone. Fancy some? Find our crispbreads here.

Crispbread as base = pizza in 10 minutes.

Crispbread Pizza With Pulled Pork and Guacamole

August 24, 2017 | Leave a comment

Crispbread Pizza With Pulled Pork and Guacamole

Another lovely version of crispbread pizza – this time with pulled pork and avocado cream. Oh yes. Guaranteed to make you popular. We like the original Leksands (blue packaging) for this, but any big round will work as the toppings are so flavoursome.

  • 1 round of Leksands crispbread
  • 100ml tomato sauce
  • 75g pulled pork (leftovers or ready bought)
  • 1 tomato
  • 60g mozzarella
  • 2 handfuls grated Vasterbotten– (or Cheddar)
  • 1/2 red onion, thinly sliced
  • 1 lime
  • 1 avocado
  • Fresh chili, finely chopped
  • Fresh coriander, finely chopped
  • Sea salt & freshly ground pepper

1. Pre-heat oven to 225 degrees celsius.
2. Prep the pickled onion; place thinly sliced onion in a bowl and cover with lime juice, squeezing it together with a spoon or your hand.
3. Spread the tomato sauce over the base. Add the sliced fresh tomato and chunks of pulled pork. Season with salt and pepper, then finish with the cheese.

Bake for approximately 10 minutes until the cheese is bubbly and slightly golden. Meanwhile, mash the avocado with the chili, coriander and lime juice – serve with a dollop of guacamole.

Enjoy!

—–

Thanks to our friends at Leksands for the recipe – just mildly adapted for a UK kitchen.

7 Random Facts About Surströmming

August 16, 2017 | Leave a comment

7 Random Facts About Surströmming

  1. Surströmming is made by preserving the raw herring with just enough salt to prevent it from rotting, then left to ferment for at least 6 months. A Japanese study ranks it as one of the most putrid food smells on the planet.
  2. Surströmming day is the 3rd Thursday in August – in 2017 this falls on the 17th August.
  3. Surströmming translated to sour Baltic herring. Tempting, ey?
  4. How to eat it? A common way is to have it in a ‘klämma’ – a ‘squeeze’. Take two pieces of (crunchy) flatbread and spread with sliced or crushed boiled potato, add the surströmming, squeeze and enjoy. Alternatively, place on a soft flatbread with potato, sour cream and some raw onion. Eat as a wrap. Think of it as the Swedish burrito.
  5. Whatever you do – NEVER open the tin inside. To say the smell is strong is an understatement. And it lingers.
  6. Beer and aquavit are commonly served along with it – but milk, too, is a common drink.
  7. Surströmming is so smelly it is forbidden on most airlines.

Despite (or because of – we don’t know) the smell – surströmming is very popular in Sweden, and many await the season with anticipation, dreaming about the first taste of this speciality.

Our Jonas had a chat with a lovely chap from the Telegraph a few years ago – to find out what he thought have a look at the resulting video here, or click here to read about it.

Have you tried it? What did you think? Share in comments please – we’d love to hear your thoughts on this smelly subject.

 

Easy Västerbotten Cheese Quiche

August 10, 2017 | Leave a comment

Easy Västerbotten Cheese Quiche

A great side dish for a crayfish party – this traditional cheese tart is really lovely served with caviar dressing.

For the pastry:
125g cold butter
200g plain flour
pinch of salt
1 egg (plus water, if needed – add a few drops if dough is not coming together)

For the filling:
250g Västerbotten cheese, grated
3 eggs
100ml whole milk
250ml double cream
½ tsp paprika, salt and pepper

You’ll need a tart tin (25-28cm diameter) with a loose base.

Method:

  1. Blitz your pastry ingredients in a food processor (egg and water at the end only) to form a dough, then leave to chill for about 30 minutes in the fridge.
  2. Heat the oven to 180°C.
  3. Roll out the chilled dough and line the pastry tin. Prick the base with a fork and blind bake using baking beans for 10-12 minutes. Remove the beans and bake for a further 5-6 minutes.
  4. For the filling, mix together everything except the Västerbotten cheese.
  5. Scatter the cheese on the base of the pastry, evenly all over – then pour over the egg mixture.
  6. Return it to the oven for about 15-20 minutes. It’ll puff up quite a bit towards the end, but will turn golden on top. It’s done when it is ‘set’ so do keep an eye on it.

Leave it to cool before slicing. Serve cold or lukewarm.

Västerbottenpaj goes well with romsås, a caviar sauce. Alternatively, if you can get real bleak roe (Löjrom), serve the tart with a spoonful of this, some crème fraîche and finely chopped red onion.

Romsås Caivar Sauce:

In a bowl, mix together 3 large tbsp. crème fraiche and one jar of red lumpfish roe (80g). Leave to set in the fridge, then stir again just before serving.

Semla Season 2017 – Everything You Need To Know

January 26, 2017 | Leave a comment

 

Semla Season 2017 – Everything You Need To Know

After Christmas we always feel determined to start a new and healthier life – less chocolate and more spinach, but only until we remember the next big occasion in the Scandi baking calendar; Semla season. Semla is the Swedish answer to pancake-day pancakes, but in our completely unbiased opinion; a million miles better and far too good to only eat once per year.

We started selling these chubby marzipan and cream filled buns of glory in the café a few weeks ago – and as we are now only 1 month away from the big day, it is time to kick off and remind each other what the Semla is all about. We have collated some essential reading (all the important semla-facts), our favourite recipes, and our very own semla product bundles if you want to give them a go at home without the hassle of seeking out the products you need. Ah, you’re welcome. Public semla-service is what we do.

– 12 Things You Need To Know About Semlor –

– Princess Semlor – The 2017 Luxury Semla – Recipe –

Princess Semla Recipe Image

Classic Semlor – Swedish Marzipan Cream Buns – Recipe

Classic Semlor Recipe


 

Fancy doing some baking? Try our kits to get started;

    Cinnamon Bun – Product Bundle
    £9.75
    - +

 

Now, promise you try one. Come say Hej and have a coffee and semla with us in our café or make your own, just don’t go without. They are too good to be missed.

Swedish Cheesecake – Ostkaka – Recipe

January 18, 2017 | Leave a comment

Swedish Cheesecake (Ostkaka)

If you’re looking for one of those sweet Americans style cheesecakes, forget it. This is the much less sweet Swedish version – ‘Ostkaka’ – which simply means cheesecake. It is a really old Swedish traditional favourite, first mentioned in the 16th century – it’s that old.

The original version requires you to go buy some rennet and make milk curds from scratch, but cottage cheese works well too, so that’s what I use in my version. Indeed, most people use cottage cheese nowadays except purists. I’d say this cheesecake is not dissimilar to the ones you get in Northern Spain, in the Basque Country – and, like the Spanish ones, work well with a glass of sweet sherry on the side. This recipe is naturally gluten free.

This cheesecake is served lukewarm, never cold and never hot. Most people enjoy it with a dollop of strawberry or cloudberry jam on top, although I prefer a quickly made compote and some fresh berries.

The recipe fits a standard brownie tray, approx 20 x 20 or similar, but you can use any sort of dish or even a spring form. Just don’t forget to line the dish.

Ostkaka with hallon (raspberries)
  • 3 eggs
  • 75g caster sugar
  • 400g natural cottage cheese
  • 100ml double cream
  • 50 g ground almond
  • 1 tsp vanilla sugar or vanilla bean paste
  • Pinch of salt
  • 1 tsp almond essence (optional)
  • 50g flaked almonds
  • Dusting of ground cardamom
For the topping:
  • 125g raspberries
  • 2tbsp sugar
  • Dash of water
How to:

Turn the oven to 160 degrees celsius fan (170 degrees normal).

Whisk the sugar and egg until light and fluffy. Add all the ingredients apart from the flaked almonds and cardamom and pour into your prepared tin.

Scatter the flaked almonds on top, then dust the tiny bit of ground cardamom (less than 1/2 tsp – it’s just for a bit of flavour).

Place in the oven and bake until set and slightly golden on top. This depends on your oven – but around 30-40 mins is a good guideline.

To make the topping: Place 100g raspberries in a saucepan, add the sugar and a dash of water and boil until the raspberries have broken down and it looks like a runny jam. Leave to cool. Use the remaining berries to decorate.

Kalles Kaviar – The Legend, The Myth, The Breakfast Topper

January 12, 2017 | Leave a comment

Kalles Kaviar – Everyday Hero #1

This is the first of six posts – each presenting one of our favourite everyday products. The things we eat again and again and that always provide a taste of home.

Open a random Swedish fridge and chances are you’ll find at least one blue and yellow tube of creamed cod roe with a smiley blonde on the pack. Creamed cod roe..may not sound very appetising, but its slightly salty, savoury mild taste makes it an excellent addition to your egg-sandwich – and this, indeed, is how most people enjoy it.

We have shared the recipe on this Swedish delicacy before – check it out here; Kalles Kaviar 3 Ways.

Kalles Kaviar Kaviar

What’s the fuss about you may ask? Well let us tell you how it all started (drumwhirl please)..
Kalles Kaviar was launched in Sweden in 1954, and is based on several hundred years old recipe from the Swedish west coast. Its iconic blue and yellow tube has changed little since then, and is a much-loved sight for a Swede in need of some TLC. No one is quite sure who to credit for the recipe, which was bought by Abba from a peddler for around 1000SEK – a small fortune in the 50s.

The mystery of Kalles remains to this day – not least to non-Swedes, who struggle to find anything lovable about this little bit of Sweden in a tube – well, maybe apart from Kalles’ smiley self.

Fancy some? Order some Kalles and some crispbread today and we’ll send it straight to you – your Swedish breakfast dreams will soon be answered.

 

Swedish Meatball Sandwich – Recipe

October 6, 2016 | Leave a comment

Swedish Meatballs With a Chance of Lingon

We love meatballs. Who doesn’t? A meatball a day keeps the doctor away, and so on.

Aside from the usual preparation, meatballs with creamy mash, cream sauce and sharp lingonberries (we have a lovely recipe for a meatball dinner here), we like eating them as a sandwich.

Here’s our simple Meatball Sandwich;

Swedish Meatball Sandwich Step by Step

  1. Start by cutting your meatballs into smaller chunks and fry them on medium heat in a little butter to make the edges go golden crisp, until they are warmed through. They’re already cooked so no need to cook them for very long.
  2. Then grab a plate and place 1 round polarbrod on it; we like it toasted but it doesn’t have to be. Spread a little salted butter on. Add a green leaf if you want. Spinach or rocket is good, or just plain lettuce. It adds a bit of freshness and crunch.
  3. Spread the beetroot salad on top your bread, approximately two tablespoons.
    Variation; Swap pickled red cabbage for the beetroot.
  4. Finish by adding your warm meatballs, some chopped chives and perhaps lingonberry jam, although we tend to think the sweetness from the beetroot salad is enough in this instance.
  5. Add a good sprinkling of salt and pepper to finish.

Sit down. Grab a knife and a fork and enjoy. ‘Mums filibaba’, as a Swede would say! (it means Yummy!).

Fancy making this? We have a bundle for you:

    Swedish Meatball Sandwich
    £6.97 £6.49
    - +
    Felix Lingon – Wild Lingonberry Jam 283g
    £2.29

Like this post? Share it on Facebook to spread the meatball-love – button below.

Ways to eat Kalles Kaviar

February 26, 2015 | 1 Comment

The most popular item we sell, by miles, is Kalles Kaviar – a creamed cod roe spread from Sweden.

Yes, we know – it doesn’t sound so fancy to the person who hasn’t tasted it.  We are aware of this. But 9 million Swedes can’t be wrong. Oh, and Norwegians enjoy cod roe too… And all the other people in the world who are now addicted.

If you want to try it, we suggest adding it to your breakfast, as is the place you most often see Kalle’s Kaviar in Scandinavia (The Norwegian brand of same product is called Mill’s Kaviar, in case you were wondering).

Option 1: The Basic.

Crispbread, butter, sliced hardboiled egg, a neat squirt of kalle’s Kaviar. Done.

This is by far the most Swedish way to enjoy it. Utterly delicious. Highly recommend Leksands Crispbread for this.

Option 2: A bit fancier.

Toasted sourdough bread, smashed avocado, poached egg, squirt of Kalle’s Kaviar. Optional dill.

Fancier, requires a bit of prep – but really lovely.

Option 3: Extra Healthy

Dark, seeded rye bread, butter. Two boiled eggs, Kalles Kaviar squeezed out onto every bite of the egg.

Very traditional – and the dark rye bread is super good for you.

Keep your Kalle’s Kaviar in the fridge both before and after opening.

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