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Monthly Archives: May 2018

Mother’s Day Recipes to Treat Your Mamma

May 27, 2018 | Leave a comment

 

Mother’s Day – For all those lovely Scandi Mammas

Mother’s Day was celebrated the first time in 1908 following an initiative from Anna Marie Jarvis who wanted to honour her mother for her work during the American civil war. The celebration became official in 1913, and set to fall on the second Sunday in May which is the day most countries observe it. In the UK it is celebrated the fourth Sunday of lent, as it originated as a day for Christians to visit their ‘mother’ church.

Regardless of when it is celebrated, a special day to treat your Mamma should be acknowledged – a sweet card, maybe some flowers or a treat are all safe ways to make her feel special. And as we think nothing quite says ‘Mamma, you’re the best’ like baked goods – here are some of our favourite recipes for a Sunday dedicated to mamma.

  1. Classic cinnamon buns. You can’t go wrong with these – like a hug in bun-form.
  2. Sally’s chocolate buns. In case you live with someone who are more chocolatey than cinnamon-y. Think cinnamon bun but with chocolate in place of the cinnamon filling.
  3. Chokladbollar – Chocolate Oat Treats – For when you don’t have time to bake, these no-bake classics are perfect. Chocolatey with hints of coffee and oats – a lovely little treat.
  4. Lingonberry and spice layer cake (recipe in ScandiKitchen: Fika & Hygge). Looks gratifyingly impressive for the comparatively easy process – sure to score you tons of offspring-points.
  5. Seeded rye rolls (recipe in the ScandiKitchen cookbook) Perhaps not your typical treat – but just imagine how nice it is to wake to a house smelling of freshly made bread, the breakfast table set and the coffee brewing. Nothing to do for mamma but sit down. A loving gesture if ever we saw one. Just make sure you also take care of the tidying up – unfortunately any goodwill built up from enjoying a prepared breakfast is at risk of dissipating with each crumb that needs tidying.
  6. Crispy Waffles – For breakfast, fika or lunch. It is hard to beat a still hot waffle topped with whipped cream and jam!
  7. A cup of really good coffee and a card. It doesn’t have to be complicated. Write a card and say thanks for being mamma and bring her a cup of coffee or tea. This one is our current favourite.

Picture credit: Peter Cassidy for Ryland Peters & Small / The ScandiKitchen Cookbook

Brown Cheese – Where to Start

May 24, 2018 | Leave a comment

Ever wondered where to start with brown cheese? Scared of the taste, the colour, or even the texture? It is loved by Norwegians everywhere and gaining popularity elsewhere too. The distinctive tangy-sweet taste is quite unique – we think you’ll like it too.

In Norway there are many more varieties – but these are the most popular ones. From sweet and tangy caramore to the rounder, milder ‘gudbrandsdalen’ and the rich and tangy ‘ekte geitost’ – they are all delicious on freshly baked goods! Here are just some of our favourites.

Caramore – on waffles or pancakes. With a little jam. Sweet and delicious with a nice tang.

Gudbrandsdalen – on still warm croissants with a bit of jam. Croissants are about as Norwegian as marmite, but it really works.

Ekte Geitost – on freshly made buns (again with a little jam or honey). Try them on cinnamon buns, halved then toasted and buttered.

 

Do you eat it differently? Let us know in the comments!

    Tine Ekte Geitost – Brown Goat’s Cheese 500g
    £10.99

Recipe: Norwegian Smash & Kvikklunsj Brownies

May 22, 2018 | Leave a comment

Smash & Kvikklunsj Brownies

For Norway Day in Southwark Park this year, Bronte made a batch of brownies and stuffed them with the most delicious – and iconic – Norwegian chocolates. By popular demand, here are the recipes. The base recipe is the same, so just amend the filling. It also works as a SMIL chocolate brownie (add Smil and salted caramel topping), Firkløver brownie (add more hazelnuts) – and pretty much anything you can think of trying. It’s the most versatile brownie base recipe, ever. If you prefer a very sticky under baked brownie, use even less baking powder. But we find that just one teaspoon helps a bit.

Ingredients

  • 200 g good-quality 70% dark chocolate (OR a mixture of milk and dark – if you prefer a less bitter end result)
  • 250 g unsalted butter
  • 275 g caster sugar
  • 3 eggs
  • 80 g plain flour
  • 1 tsp baking powder
  • 50 g cocoa powder
  • Pinch of salt
  • 1 tsp vanilla sugar or extract

Smash

  • 200 g Smash
  • Ready made toffee sauce or chocolate sauce for decorating

Kvikklunsj

  • 3 bars Kvikklunsj cut into pieces
  • A good large handful of mini marshmallows
  • 50 g pecan or walnuts – optional

Instructions

  • Pre-heat your oven to 170C and line a brownie tin (20cm x 20cm is good, but similar size can also be used – note baking times vary by oven).
  • Melt the butter and the chocolate in a bowl over simmering water – or in the microwave. Set aside to cool a little.
  • Whisk the egg and sugar, then slowly add the melted chocolate mixture.
  • Sift together the flour, cocoa, baking powder, salt and vanilla sugar – and fold into the chocolate mixture. If using vanilla extract, add at end.
  • Add 1/3 of the fillings to the mixture, then pour into the prepared tin. Add the rest of the filling on top (except the toffee sauce – and hold back a few marshmallows/chocolate too for decorating before serving).
  • Bake in the preheated oven for 25 to 30 minutes or until a skewer inserted into the side comes out clean – the middle can still be gooey but it should not wobble when you shake the pan. Leave to cool, then drizzle toffee sauce and the extra topping, cut into squares to serve.

Notes

Remember Bronte’s mantra: Ovens are not created equal and baking times always vary. Check your bakes.
    Smash – Choc Covered Corn Snacks 100g
    £2.99
    ScandiKitchen: Fika & Hygge by Bronte Aurell
    £16.99
    Freia Firklover Chocolate – Milk Chocolate With Nuts 250g
    £5.99
    Freia Smil – Chocolate With Caramel Centre 78g
    £3.09
    Fazer Cacao – Cocoa Powder 200g
    £3.39
    Freia Kvikklunsj – Chocolate Covered Wafer 47g
    Rated 5.00 out of 5
    £1.79

The Bridge – hotdog style

May 18, 2018 | Leave a comment

 

The Bridge – hotdog style

When it comes to food, we Danes and Swedes have our little differences. Take our hotdogs, for example – and here’s our The Bridge Hot Dog version. Do you prefer you hotdog Danish or Swedish?!

The hugely popular Nordic noir TV series The Bridge Season 4 is currently showing on BBC 2 on Friday nights. It is the final series and the one that will hopefully provide all the answers.

For those who do not know, the story started when a body was found on the bridge that connects Denmark with Sweden – with half of the body on the Danish side, half on the Swedish, forcing the two crime teams to work together.

For us Scandies, The Bridge provide an amazing way to experience both different languages spoken in one series, with everybody understanding what is going on. The funny thing is, there’s only 600 words difference between Danish and Swedish, so we actually do understand each other most of the time, even when we just speak our own languages.

Watch this space for an upcoming competition to win the entire box set of The Bridge season 1-4 along with LOTS of Danish and Swedish goodies to go with it. More details will be released next week. A massive 13 DVDs: you will literally not need to leave your house for the entire weekend if you win this box set and all that food.

We’ll be running this competition together with the nice people at Arrow Films. More next week.

How To: Celebrate 17th May

May 14, 2018 | Leave a comment

How to celebrate 17th May - Norway Day

17th of May is a special day. Also known as ‘Norway Day’ it is the day the Norwegian constitution was signed – and thanks to Norway’s history of being ruled by big brothers Sweden and Denmark, the celebrations for this important step towards autonomy has been celebrated greatly since*. Anyone who has been to Norway for the day can attest to this – there are great big parades, double digit repetitions of the national anthem, so much flag waving you would get tennis elbow if you’re not careful and naturally a champagne breakfast to kick it all off. It is also a national holiday – lovely!

 

For some reason it is not recognised as such elsewhere so the celebrations tend to be slightly dulled – but that doesn’t mean you can’t drape yourself in red white and blue or wear your bunad to work (it just means most people will have no clue why you are dressed so peculiarly).

 

So, dear Nordmenn – Norwegians – abroad, this is for you.  A little how to celebrate if you’re stuck far away from the land of brown cheese and tall blonde people.

 

Host your own:

Breakfast or brunch. On the day the traditional choice – but we don’t think anyone would mind if you move it to, say, the nearest Saturday so you can take your time and not rush off to work (or feel guilty for being late).

The traditional brunch is for many a big buffet table of everything nice – scrambled eggs, smoked salmon, charcuterie (Norwegian fenalår being the prime choice), fresh fruit and veggies, cheeses, a cake, strawberries, fruit juice and champagne. For example. Both fenalår, cheeses and salmon are things we supply – so do pop by or get your order in online in time for brunch (last orders for next day delivery is 1pm – choose next day delivery at checkout).

Join the official celebrations:

In London? Join us in Southwark Park where the official celebration kicks off around 10am when we start serving our brunch platter. Fresh bread rolls, scrambled egg, salmon, cheeses, ham, freshly cut strawberries and a glass of bubbly or orange juice – a lovely start to the day which will continue with a parade, speeches and entertainment (just like in Norway). There will also be a bar serving drinks, coffee and cake, hot dogs and treats, ice cream and other goodies available during the day. All Norwegian, of course!

The brunch is pre-booking only – tickets can be found here.

Head to our café for hot dogs, solo, waffles & Bløtekake:

Our café is open as usual from 8am to 7pm and will be focusing a little extra on Norwegians in addition to our regular offering of lots of freshly made open sandwiches, salads, cakes and drinks –

  • We’ll be serving hot dogs in lompe (potato ‘wraps’ – if you know you know)
  • Krone-Is strawberry (imported specially!)
  • Waffles with brown cheese
  • Lots of Solo
  • Bløtekake
  • Free coffee to anyone wearing their bunad (better get polishing those silver brooches!).

Expect A-ha in the background and a lot of ‘Gratulerer med dagen’ – we look forward to seeing you.

*For the most part – there were a few exceptions, e.g. during the German occupation in the second world war, when waving of the Norwegian flag was forbidden

Recipe: The best summer slaw

May 6, 2018 | Leave a comment

Bronte’s summer coleslaw

There’s coleslaw and then there is coleslaw.
I love coleslaw, I really do, but I detest the gloopy factory-made rubbish that seems to have become standard fare in supermarkets all over. If you ask me, the secret to a good slaw is lightly pickling the cabbage base before adding a punchy, flavourful dressing.
Course: Side Dish
Cuisine: Scandinavian
Author: Bronte Aurell

Ingredients

CABBAGE BASE

  • 300 g shredded white and red cabbage
  • 1 red onion
  • 2 large carrots
  • 100 ml water + 1 tbsp
  • 100 ml white wine vinegar + 1 tbsp
  • 3 tbsp icing’ sugar or confectioners’ sugar
  • ½ tsp salt

DRESSING

  • 3 tbsp mayonnaise
  • 3 tbsp buttermilk
  • 1 tbsp icing’ sugar or confectioners’ sugar
  • 1 tsp Dijon mustard
  • 1 tsp white wine vinegar only if needed
  • ½ tsp celery salt
  • 1 tsp grated fresh horseradish or horseradish sauce
  • salt
  • ground black pepper

TO SERVE

  • 3 spring onions/scallions sliced
  • 50 g toasted walnuts chopped
  • 30-35 g pumpkin seeds

Instructions

  • Place the shredded white and red cabbage in a large bowl. Finely slice the red onion into half rounds, and then grate (or julienne, if you can be bothered) the carrots and add both to the bowl. In another bowl or jug/pitcher, mix together the water, white wine vinegar, icing/confectioners’ sugar and salt. Pour over the cabbage, then cover the bowl and shake well. Leave for at least one hour, ideally two – shake it once in a while. You’re lightly sousing the cabbage, ensuring it is easier to eat and digest.
  • Press the cabbage free of excess vinegar liquid and leave in a sieve/strainer until excess vinegar has drained. The cabbage will now be softer and the onion appear almost a little cooked. Make sure the vinegar is well pressed out or the end result will be too acidic.
  • Mix together the ingredients for the dressing. Mix the dressing with the slaw and taste – it should be a bit tangy. If not, add a teaspoon extra of vinegar (this depends how much of the pickle juice was pressed out – it is easier to add a bit than remove if too much).
  • Just before serving, fold in the spring onion/scallions and toasted chopped walnuts. Sprinkle over the pumpkin seeds for extra crunch. This coleslaw is extra delicious on days two and three – when it will be pink (if you have used red cabbage).

Notes

Recipe from her book ScandiKitchen Summer – out now.
Great served alongside the Beef Lindstroöm burgers or just as a side to most other summer dishes.
 

Recipe: Beef Lindström Burgers

May 5, 2018 | Leave a comment

Hello sunshine, summer and barbecue season.

Well, it is not like we Scandinavians only BBQ in the summer. No no, we do it all year round, especially the Swedes and Norwegians who will happily step outside to grill those Wienerkorv sausages in minus 20 (it’s quite a thing in the Scandinavian ski resorts, this).

Over the next few days we will add some nice ideas for you to take to your garden and bring a bit of a Scandi flair to your BBQ.

From Bronte Aurell’s new book, ScandiKitchen Summer, comes this lovely take on the Swedish classic Biff Lindström – in her book, she decided to make them into burgers. A classic combo of ground beef and beetroot – with an egg on top. The book does not contain a recipe for the rye burger buns, so we have added those at the end here. If you can’t be bothered to bake your own burger buns, go for a nice brioche bun.

Beef Lindström Burgers

One of the most famous burgers in Sweden, the biff à la Lindström is named after Henrik Lindström, a prominent industrialist with Swedish parents, who grew up in St Petersburg in Russia. On holidays in Sweden, he taught the chef at his hotel how to make this burger with capers and beetroot/beet. It became a hit across the country – and rightly so as the combination is super-nice. The traditional way of serving these is without the bun and with potatoes on the side. We used to make it like this at home, until my burger-loving kids suggested we add a bun and have it with coleslaw one sunny day.
Sometimes, having Anglo-Scandinavian children who are not bound by ‘how things are usually done in Scandinavia’ means we can find new ways of enjoying old classics. The patties are quite fragile, so be aware of this if you plan to stick them on the BBQ.
Course: Dinner
Cuisine: Swedish
Servings: 4
Author: Bronte Aurell

Ingredients

For the burgers

  • 500 g minced/ground beef
  • a good pinch of salt
  • 1 onion finely chopped
  • 100 g pickled beetroot/beet finely chopped
  • 40 g pickled cucumber or gherkins finely chopped
  • 2 tbsp capers roughly chopped
  • 1 medium cooked white potato
 approx. 80 g/3 oz., peeled and
 roughly mashed
  • 4 egg yolks
  • 1 tsp Dijon mustard
  • salt
  • ground black pepper
  • olive oil or rapeseed oil and butter for frying
  • 4 eggs to serve

For the rye burger buns

  • 25 g fresh yeast or 13g dry active
  • 150 ml lukewarm water 36-37C
  • 150 ml lukewarm whole milk
  • 50 g light brown sugar
  • 1 egg plus ½ egg for the glaze
  • 200 g dark rye flour
  • 400 g white bread flour
  • 1 ½ tsp salt
  • 80 g soft butter
  • black or white sesame seeds to decorate
  • ½ egg to glaze

Instructions

For the Burgers

  • Put the minced/ground beef and salt in a stand mixer with the paddle attachment. Mix for around 1 minute on medium speed. Alternatively, you can mix for a little longer in a large bowl with a wooden spoon.
  • Add the onion, beetroot/beet, pickled cucumber or gherkins, capers, cooked potato, egg yolks and mustard. Season with salt and black pepper. Mix again until all the ingredients are evenly incorporated (but not too long or the burger will become tough).
  • Shape the mixture into 4 burgers and leave them to rest for 30 minutes in the fridge before frying.
  • Preheat the oven to 120°C (250°F) Gas 1/2.
  • Heat the oil and butter in a frying pan/skillet. Fry the burgers (in batches if needed, depending on the size of your pan) over a high heat for about 3–4 minutes on each side, depending on how you like your beef to be cooked.
  • Once cooked, pop the beef patties in the oven to keep warm and fry the eggs sunny-side up in the same frying pan/skillet. Serve each beef patty on a lightly toasted burger bun with the fried egg on top. Serve with summer slaw and condiments on the side.
  • To serve:
Seeded rye burger buns or buns of your choice, toasted
Summer Slaw, condiments of your choice

For the Rye Burger Buns

  • Add the yeast to a mixing bowl and then add the sugar and milk and water. Mix until everything has dissolved.
  • Add the rye flour and then start adding the white flour and salt. Add the egg and the butter. Keep kneading on a medium setting – around five minutes – adding as much flour as needed as you go. You may need more or less than stated here. Your dough should be sticky – cover with cling film and leave to rise for around an hour until doubled in size.
  • Line your baking sheets.
  • Knead the dough through and cut into 7-9 pieces depending on the sizing of your buns. Roll the pieces into even and uniform rolls and place on the baking sheet, a good distance apart (5-6 cm). Leave to rise under a damp teatowel until doubled in size again (could be another hour, but times vary).
  • Turn the oven to 180C
  • Brush the buns lightly with egg wash and add the black sesame seed (or use light brown ones, if you prefer – I just like the contrast of the dark seeds). Its always a good idea to keep the moisture in the oven when you bake these – so I always add a bowl of water to the bottom shelf of the oven.
  • Bake for about 12-14 minutes or until baked through – it depends on your oven. Remove from oven and allow to cool before using. These buns freeze well.

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