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Monthly Archives: May 2017

7 random ways to be more Danish for Danish National Day

May 26, 2017 | Leave a comment


7 random ways to be more Danish for Danish National Day

The 5th June is when our constitution was signed in 1849. In fact, most big events with laws and constitutions and general updates have been done on this day (good for continuity). Also, it is Father’s Day in Denmark on this day.

1. Flags. Everywhere. Danish ones, ideally. Have a flagpole in your garden? Most Danes do. You should totally get one. Daily flags are good. If you are low on flags, get yourself one of these fancy national hats, invented by a Dane. You’ll look cool, promise.

2. Eat open sandwiches. We love them. The opener, the better. Never a top on, and always with really good solid rye bread as a base.

3. Know you Danish Royals: The Queen is called Margrethe and she loves daisies and she is a really good artist. Her husband is called Prince Henrik and he is retired from something. He’s probably still upset he never became King, but then again, he believes in unicorns. Also, the Crown Prince is called Frederik and he is married to an Australian lady now known as Crown Princess Mary. They have a lot of very beautiful children. Frederik’s brother is called Joakim and he also has a lot of beautiful children. Note: Queen Margrethe wins because  she can smoke, eat a hotdog and drink juice all at the same time.

4. Learn how to pronounce Rødgrød med Fløde. When you can do this, you can be a Dane.

5. Eat Remoulade on everything. It’s a yellow curried type mayonnaise. Eat it with chips, roast beef, fried fish, salami, meatballs, on burgers, on hotdogs. If you don’t like remoulade, you will never, ever be a real Dane.

6. Just for the day, paint the entire interior of your house white and remove all curtains. White floors, white walls, white ceilings, white everything. And no curtains. Buy stylish stuff for your white house in one colour, as a statement. Feel the hygge.

7. Make jokes about Sweden. Every Dane knows to make fun of Swedes. It’s the done thing. On this day, crack jokes like “ why wasn’t Jesus born in Sweden? They couldn’t find 3 wise men” HARHARHAR.

See? It wasn’t that hard to become Danish, was it?

WIN! Finnish Treats & Film Bundle

May 24, 2017 | Leave a comment

WIN! Finnish Treats & DVD Bundle

No weekend without Fredagsmys – settling down after a long week with something yummy to nibble on and mildly to highly entertaining on the TV is something many of us appreciate.

This week you can win a Finnish-themed treat-box – woohooo!

This week, we have teamed up with the lovely people at Artificial Eye to celebrate the release of The Other Side of Hope – a warm-hearted comedy directed by Finn Aki Kaurismäki – you can watch the trailer here.

We are giving away a lovely big bundle of Finnish sweets and snacks as well as the entire collection of Aki Kaurismäki DVDs, The Other Side of Hope poster and a Curzon Artifical Eye Tote Bag.

To win, simply answer this easy question..

The colours in the Finnish flag are..
A: Red, white and blue
B: Red and white
C: Blue and white

Send your answer to finland@scandikitchen.co.uk by 12 noon Wednesday the 31st of May 2017 to be in with a chance of winning.

The usual rules apply. UK residents only. No cheating. One main winner. No alternative prize and no cash alternative.

The Other Side of Hope hits cinemas on 26 May. Fancy seeing it? Find out where it’s playing and book your tickets here: www.theothersideofhope.com

*This competition is done in partnership with Artificial Eye and subject to change. The winner will be contacted directly.

Recipe: Verdens Beste Kake (World’s best Cake?)

May 11, 2017 | Leave a comment

Verden’s Bedste

Norway has lots of great cakes – but we think that Verden’s Bedste really is one of the best ones. Perfect for Norway Day on 17th May. Calling something the ‘world’s best cake’ is quite a statement, but not something taken lightly by the Norwegians. This cake contains the most delicious whipped cream, sponge, pastry cream and meringue – it’s everything you could ever want wrapped up together in one bite. This cake is so seriously good that it is often labelled the national cake of Norway. It is also known as Kvæfjord cake. Kvæfjord is a municipality in Tromsø in northern Norway, an absolutely stunning place with picture-perfect rolling green hills, rocky fells and deep blue fjords . To eat this cake in that setting: it doesn’t get better than that, at least not in our mind.
Course: Baking
Cuisine: Norwegian
Keyword: cakes
Author: Bronte Aurell

Ingredients

  • 150 g butter
  • 130 g caster sugar
  • 5 egg yolks
  • 150 g plain flour or cake flour
  • 1 tsp baking powder
  • 1 tsp vanilla sugar OR extract OR use the seeds from 1 vanilla pod
  • 100 ml whole milk

FILLING:

  • 150 ml whipping cream
  • 1/2 portion of Pastry Cream you can use ‘Kagecreme’ – powder stirred with milk – ready in 5 mins – or make your own.

MERINGUE TOPPING:

  • 5 egg whites
  • a pinch of cream of tartar
  • 250 g caster sugar
  • 75 g flaked almonds
  • a 35 x 25-cm/14 x 93/ 4-inch rectangular cake pan greased and lined with baking parchment

Instructions

  • Preheat the oven to 160°C (325°F) Gas 3.
  • In a stand mixer (or using a hand-held electric whisk) cream together the butter and sugar until pale and light. Add the egg yolks one at a time, beating to ensure everything is well incorporated. Sift in the plain or cake flour, baking powder and vanilla and fold in. Lastly, add the whole milk and fold again until fully combined. Spoon the mixture into the prepared pan and spread out evenly and set aside aside for a moment.
  • Next make the meringue topping. Using a completely clean bowl, whisk the egg whites with the cream of tartar until soft peaks form. Add the sugar very slowly, bit by bit, beating on high speed until stiff peaks form (about 5 minutes). Spread the meringue mixture on top of the cake mixture. Scatter the flaked almonds on top.
  • Bake in the preheated oven for 35–40 minutes or until a skewer inserted into the middle comes out clean and the meringue is firm. Leave to cool for a few minutes in the pan then turn out carefully, so the meringue is still on top. Leave to cool completely.
  • Whip the cream until stiff and fold together with the pastry cream.
  • To assemble, cut the cake into two halves. On one half, spread the pastry cream mixture, then carefully layer the other half on top. Leave to set in the refrigerator for an hour before serving. The meringue will stay mallowy and the base soft.

Notes

Recipe taken from ScandiKitchen: Fika & Hygge by Bronte Aurell (Ryland Peters & Small, £16.99) Photography by the amazing Peter Cassidy.

7 Random Things About 17th May – Norway Day

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7 Random Facts About 17th May – Norway Day

  1. Norway day – the 17th of May – is celebrated as it was the day Norway got its constitution, back in 1814.
    Norwegian Constitution 17 May

  2. It is the busiest day of the year for Norway’s king – a whole day of waving is intense.

  3. 17th May is the final day of ‘russetid’ – graduation time for students. 3 weeks of solid partying, all culminating on the morning of 17th May. 

  4. 17th of May is the day Norwegians eat the most ice cream (if it is sunny) – up to 10 times the average amount for a sunny spring day.
    iskrem norway day
  5. During WW2 it was forbidden to parade for 17th of May. It was also forbidden to wear the Norwegian flag’s colours on one’s clothes – contributing to its importance as a symbol of Norway’s freedom ever since.
    17 mai tog
  6. Marching bands are an important part of the parades – and marching band is the second most popular past time among Norwegian children (surpassed only by football).
    Korps marching band
  7. It is a national holiday, but since the 18th is not, the celebrations start early – Champagne breakfast at 7am is common, so you have time to eat and drink in time to watch the main parade starting around 10am (varies regionally).
    17 mai frokost

  8.  And an extra one – remember to say congratulations to every Norwegian you see.

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