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Search Results for: sausages



ScandiKitchen Prinskorv – Mini Sausages 300g

November 15, 2018

Serving suggestion: Heat a glug og oil in a frying pan and add the Prinskorv sausages. Fry on medium heat for 4-5 minutes until heated through. Serve as a side dish in a traditional smörgåsbord.

This is a cooked product best eaten warm.

Scandi BBQ time (and the best sausages ever)

July 21, 2017

 

Scandi BBQ time (and the best sausages ever)

We love a good Barbeque – and now that the sun has gone a bit, we can enjoy some nice Scandi weather: bit of rain, bit of overcast and a delightful 20 degrees – a temperature at which we Northern people thrive well.

Fancy trying a few Scandi sausages next time you fire up the grill? These ones are super nice – from the makers Per I Viken based in Skåne, Southern Sweden. We searched high and low for the best, best ones – and these are it. We think they are absolutely perfect.

Chili & Cheese

A bit of extra spice – the Chili & Cheese is best with ketchup and just with a lovely potato salad on the side.

Salsiccia

This is one of our BBQ favourites combining the flavours of Italy with Swedish locally sourced meat to produce a succulent banger with loads of flavour. This sausage is gluten-free and lactose-free. We love the name Don Persson!

 

Grill Sausage (Korv)

The perfect BBQ sausage and the most common Scandi option. Grill for 5-6 minutes over hot coals – this one is delicious with a good strong mustard or even in a hotdog bun with all the usual toppings.

Side dishes

Corn on the cob with Västerbotten cheese

Once the meat is done, brush pre-boiled corn on the cob with some butter and season – then cook on the BBQ to heat through. Once it has a good colour and heat, roll finely grated vasterbotten cheese and some finely chopped parsley.

The quick Potato Salad (serves 5-6)

      • Cooked, cold new potatoes (around 1 kilo)
      • A small bag of radishes, very finely sliced
      • 3 Spring onion, finely sliced
      • Half mayo half crème fraiche mixed with:
        • Lemon juice, salt, pepper, 1 good tsp Dijon mustard.

Mix all the veg, mix the dressing separately –and then combine. The amount of mayo really depends on you and your mayo-needs. I use a good squirt of both (2-4 tbsp) – but really, make it creamy or make it light and just adjust seasoning to fit.

Don’t have a barbecue? You can grill these sausages in your oven too, cover your table in salads and condiments and have a picnic on the floor. Or just eat at the table. Up to you!

Browse our sausages here – we deliver next working day UK wide. Do let us know what you think of these if you try them!

 

Per i Viken Wienerkorv – Wiener Sausages 8-pack (Wienerpølse)

July 11, 2012

Per I Viken is a renowned Swedish producer, and their Wienerkorv – Wiener sausages – are fantastic . Lightly smoked with a good bite, these are brilliant for hotdogs – simply boil or barbecue then serve in a bun or potato wrap with your favourite sauces, condiments and toppings. We like ketchup, mustard, crispy onions, remoulade, seafood salad and cucumber relish. Not necessarily all at once, but then again, why not? In Sweden they’ll even add mashed potatoes. This is a chilled item. Suitable for freezing.

Polarica Lingonberries 500g (Tyttebær / Puolukka)

July 30, 2019

Lingonberries are a staple in Sweden and Norway, and we love serving them with rich meat dishes such as meatballs or sausages. Lingonberries grow wild in the Swedish and Norwegian forests, and are small, bright red berries with a very tart flavour. High in vitamin C and antioxidants – a bit of a superfood. Heat and stir with sugar for a delicious, homemade jam to serve with meatballs. Please note these are frozen but will be shipped chilled. They may defrost a little during shipping, but are fine to re-freeze – they may be a bit mushier though. We recommend using within 1 month.

How to hotdog (the Scandi way)

July 1, 2019

How to hotdog (the Scandinavian way)

Look, we have told the world that we’re all about nature. That we forage for weird plants, eat sour milk and lead wholesome, healthy lagom lives. This is, of course, all very true.

However, there’s another little thing that we Scandinavians ‘do’, though. A lot. We hotdog. Okay, it’s not a verb, but it should be – and we want to hotdog with you, too.

What’s so good about a Scandi Hotdog?

The Sausage

Obviously, the most important part. There are many varieties, but the best ones are rather high meat content (go figure) – brands such as small food producer Per I Viken do the best ones on the market. The style of sausage in Scandinavian is always a wiener type sausage.

In Denmark, they like RED coloured sausages. Why? It started as a bit of a ploy. In the olden days, the hotdog vendors were allowed to sell yesterday’s sausages for pittance to the kids – BUT they had to add red colouring to the water so people know they were getting day-old sausages. Nowadays, this type is the most famous of them all – and no, they are no longer old, but are just made like this for nostalgic reasons.

These are most popular with the Danes… The red thing, it’s a very Danish thing.

The Bread

It’s a funny one, but we don’t like long buns. Our buns are short and way too small for the sausage. Yeah, we know its a bit odd – but that’s how we like them. We do good, shorter buns – less bread.

Toppings

We take our topping serious. Go to the bottom of this post for the country specific ‘ways’ – but here is a basic guide:

Ketchup

It’s never Heinz. It’s usually a more spiced variety that is made for our hotdogs. Try Idun for a Norway style – or Bähncke for a superb Danish ketchup.

Mustard

Again, Bähncke is a good one – or Idun from Norway, especially for hotdogs. We also have Swedish Johnny’s mustard – a first Swedish favourite. 

Remoulade

Absolutely essential, if you are a Dane. It’s very nice, too. (also goes with chips, fish, beef and anything else, really)

Crispy onions

Delicious on burgers, hotdogs, sandwiches.

Raw onions

The Danes favour this: We like raw.

Pickles

Several options here. Boston Pickles is chopped pickles from Sweden, with a bit of seasoning. Or go for the ever popular Smörgåsgurka from Sweden – a crunchy pickle, quite sweet. Lastly, the Danish Agurkesalat – thinly sliced pickles – perfect on top of those red sausages.

Gurkmajonäs

Chopped pickles (usually smörgåsgurka) mixed with mayonnaise – favoured by Swedes. Make at home.

The HotDogs

Denmark

A bun, a red sausage, ketchup, mustard, remoulade, raw OR crispy onions. Or both. Pickled Agurkesalat.

Norway

A potato pancake called a lompe, brown pølse sausage, ketchup, mustard.

Stop press! Some Norwegians also use a waffle as a base for a hotdog. Apparently, it’s not illegal.

Sweden

A bun, a brown wienerkorv sausage, ketchup, mustard, Bostongurka or Gurkmajonäs.

Sweden 2: The above, but with a dollop of mashed potato on top. Known as Halv Special (A Half Special). Add another Sausage as it is Hel Special (Full Special).

Sweden 3: Bun, sausage, prawn cocktail. Well, yes, it’s a thing. Some add ketchup, too. And yes, some add mash as well. We’ve given up questioning this.

    K-Salat Remoulade – Sweet Piccalilli Sauce 375g
    Rated 5.00 out of 5
    £2.99 £1.99
    Gråsten Remoulade – Sweet Piccalilli Sauce 375g
    £3.29
    Korvbrodbagarna French Hot Dog Bröd / Buns 260g / 6-Pack
    £3.49
    Auran Sinappi – Hot Mustard 125g
    £1.89
    Korvbrödsbagarn Korvbröd – Hotdog Buns 10-pack (Pølsebrød)
    £2.39
    K-Salat Mayonnaise 375g
    £2.99
    Per i Viken Wienerkorv – Wiener Sausages 8-pack (Wienerpølse)
    £5.29
    Felix Smörgåsgurka – Pickled Gherkins 370g
    £2.39 £1.99
    Mills Ekte Majones – Mayonnaise 160g
    Rated 5.00 out of 5
    £3.79
    Bähncke Hotdog Ketchup 405g
    £3.09
    Bähncke Stærk Sennep – Sharp Mustard 380g
    £3.09
    Bähncke Sød Fransk Sennep – French Mustard 425g
    £3.09
    Bähncke Tomatketchup – Tomato Ketchup 420g
    £3.09
    Johnnys Senap Sötstark – Hot and Sweet Mustard 500g
    Rated 5.00 out of 5
    £3.19
    Gøl Røde Pølser – Red Hot Dogs 375g
    Rated 5.00 out of 5
    £5.09
    Bähncke Ristede Løg – Crispy Onions 100g
    Rated 5.00 out of 5
    £1.89
    Beauvais Agurkesalat – Pickled Cucumber 550g
    £3.09
    Idun Tomatketchup – Tomato Ketchup 530g
    £2.99
    Idun Pølsesennep – Mustard 490g
    £3.09

Little Lessons: Smorgasbord

April 5, 2019

Little lessons: How to Smörgåsbord

There is literally nothing more Scandinavian than a good old Smörgåsbord. Except, Smörgåsbord is a Swedish word and in Norway and Denmark, it’s called something else (Koldt Bord (cold table), and similar). But really, it’s all about food and our way of grazing through a nice, big wonderful lunch.

No matter which of the Scandinavian countries you are in, follow this guide and you won’t go far wrong, bar a few regional variations. As long as there is enough aquavit, people will be happy.

The word smörgåsbord comes from the Swedish word smörgås, meaning ‘open sandwich’ or ‘buttered bread’, and bord, meaning ‘table’. If you translate it very literally, it could also mean Butter-Goose-Table, but that would be wrong, although quite funny.

A smorgasbord is basically means a buffet made up of many smaller dishes: ‘a laid-out table’. The traditional smörgåsbord is slightly different, depending on the country you are in. Just follow the guidelines of what to eat and in what order and you’ll be all right, no matter where you are. It’s our tapas, our buffet, our small-plate-phenomena.

The term smorgasbord first cropped up outside Scandinavia during the 1939 World’s Fair in New York, when a Swedish restaurant served a smörgåsbord as we know it today. This, however, was not the first occasion of a smörgåsbord, as this was more of an accidental invention. Many centuries earlier, people in well to-do homes had what was known as an “Aquavit Table”. They would return back from whatever they had been doing (hunting moose or looking after their estates etc) and enjoy a few snacks. A few hours prior to dinner, shots of aquavit were served, likely as an afternoon pick-me-up. These were accompanied by a selection of cheeses, pickles and meats laid out on a side-table to snack on before the main meal. Over the years, the choice of dishes expanded and, one day, the Aquavit Table because the main event instead of the actual lunch or dinner. Clever marketing people at the World Fair coined a new word that since then has been adopted into a word that works in many languages.

The essence of a real smörgåsbord (or cold table) is all about taking your time to eat and talk to your guests as you do it – and share food, conversation and time. There is lots of food, granted, but we spend many hours eating it. No smörgåsbord ever took an hour – and there is no time limit on how long we might sit there – the Danish Christmas Table, for example, can easily take an entire afternoon and end with an early dinner and most certainly result in quite a hangover, too. This is why these are usually done during high seasons such as Christmas, Easter and Midsummer when people plan big get together and have time to relax and enjoy both food and company to the max.

Traditionally, a smörgåsbord is served in ‘rounds’ – on a Swedish one, usually everything is set out at the start of the meal in buffet style, whereas in Denmark, each round is brought to the table one after the other in strict order and shared round.

It’s tricky to know how to maneuver a smörgåsbord if you are a rookie, especially if you are in Denmark and nobody has told you that there are seven more rounds of food to follow the one you are eating. What foods go together? Can you put remoulade on liver pate (answer: No) and do you ever put herring with prawns (answer: NEVER). How much aquavit are you allowed to drink? (Answer: As much as you can, but not so much so that you appear drunk until everyone else is).

Rookies will fill a plate like they are at an all-you-can-eat buffet. They will also hit the aquavit hard – and you just know that no rookie will last till the end. Many a newbies have fallen off the Smörgåsbord wagon at round 2 and missed the party.

The biggest smörgåsbord of the year is at Christmas. This is the julbord (literally meaning ‘Christmas table’) and is also the one that takes the longest to complete. There are many dishes and rounds – and there will absolutely be beer and aquavit, too. And singing. Lots of singing.

During December, people across Scandinavia will attend many different julbords. There is the work julbord, the friends’ julbord, the julbord for the golf club, the book club … The most intimate one is always on Christmas Eve with the family (less drinking at that one). Then there is the smörgåsbord at Easter, Midsummer and birthdays.

The dishes on a Scandinavian smörgåsbord vary seasonally and regionally, but the main dishes are the same – and these are also what connects us Scandis together, despite living in a place 3 ½ time the size of Britain and with quite a varied food culture. This is where you will always find herring and meatballs!

Photo: ScandiKitchen Summer Cookbook – by Bronte Aurell, photo by Pete Cassidy – click on photo for link to buy a signed copy.

The order and how-to of a good Smörgåsbord

Always eat everything with a knife and fork – NEVER with your hands.

Always start with the herring. It needs its own plate, because it’s a strong fish and you don’t want it to flavor all the other foods. We eat the herring first – and it needs a glass or two of Aquavit to go with it – it pairs well in flavor. Yes, you have to drink the whole shot and smile through gritted teeth. From this follows other fish, sliced meats, warm meats, salads and other warm dishes, then cheese and then – finally – dessert. And coffee.

Everything is served buffet style or passed around the table in small servings. You will never find pre-made open sandwiches on a smörgåsbord – you are supposed to make your own as you go along – and you will also rarely find many ‘fillers’, such as warm potatoes or gravy (it is not a dinner, it is a cold table with a few contradictory warm dishes included).

A good old smörgåsbord may sound a little complicated at first, but it is a very enjoyable way to spend 4-6 hours with some really nice people you get along with. While Scandinavians will never, ever talk to you at the bus stop or in the supermarket, once you have shared a few merry tunes around the smorgasbord and a few shots of aquavit, you’ll be making new friends in no time, perhaps even find yourself fluent in a Scandinavian language by song number three.

The basic order of the smorgasbord – a guide

Round one

Pickled herring (a few different kinds, served in bowls) and shots of cold aquavit. Singing at this point is optional. Beer is the traditional drink served with smorgasbord. You can drink wine, but if you mix that with wine, it just gets you even more drunk.

Suggestion: A good plain onion herring and then Mustard herring for Swedish, Curried herring for Danish, spiced herring or tomato herring for Norway.

Round two

Fish and seafood dishes. Smoked or cured salmon (with dill & Mustard sauce). Serve bowls of good quality prawns, smoked mackerel (either fresh or literally from a tin), skagenröra, halves of hardboiled eggs or any fish other than herring – even small, warm fried plaice fillets (quite a Danish thing – goes well with remoulade dressing). Lumpfish roe and creamed cod roe on the side.

Round three

Cold meats and pâté. Smoked ham, salami, liver pâté (a firm favourite amongst all three countries), cold roast beef, rolled rullepolse sausage – any deli meats are served in this round, along with pickles and/or toppings.

Round four

Warm meats. Meatballs (Danish, Swedish, Norwegian), roast pork (Christmas only for the Danes), mini sausages – anything warm is served for this course. If you want to serve Janssons frestelse (Jansson’s Temptation – a traditional Swedish gratin-style casserole made with potatoes, onions, cream and sweet pickled sprats) for the smörgåsbord, this is the course to do it. It’s mainly served at Christmas, but can also be served at Easter with some lamb (The sprats go well with lamb). In the summer seasons, serve a light quiche instead of heavier meats – Vasterbotten cheese quiche, mushroom pie or similar. But always meatballs.

Any warm sides, such as red cabbage, can be served here – but again, warm cabbage is usually more of a winter thing. Opts for a coleslaw style in the summer.

Round five

Cheese selection. Optional decorative grapes that nobody will eat and maybe a slice of green pepper that you can put in the bin after. 2-3 cheeses is enough. Go for a good blue cheese such as Kornblost or Danish blue, a solid harder cheese – Vasterbotten is always a hit here. And a milder one such as Creamy Havarti (Åseda). For the love of Thor and Freya, get yourself a good few cheese slicers.

Round six

Dessert and coffee. Any soft cake, such as a strawberry Midsummer cake or a berry cake, works here and a nice selection of little fika treats goes well too – there won’t be many hungry people at the end of a smorgasbord, so limited selection is fine. At Christmas, you might have your creamed rice pudding, in the summer a more fruity option. Or simply little marzipan/chocolate treats with the coffee. By this time, there will be no more singing, just attempt to manoeuvre a fork.

Stuff to always serve alongside a smörgåsbord:

Rye bread, crusty bread and crispbreads, bowls of salads (beetroot salad, mainly), pickles, condiments, sauces such as dill and mustard sauce, Mayo, Danish remoulade – and more.

Traditional drinks for smörgåsbord: Beer and aquavit.

Round Seven

Bugger off – food

In Denmark, the last dish serves is called Skrub-Af Mad, this means “Bugger off, food” – it is served right at the end a few hours after the last bit of the smorgasbord – it is a signal for people to leave. This might be a light soup, a hotdog or similar.

    ScandiKitchen Prinskorv – Mini Sausages 300g
    £3.99 £2.99
    ScandiKitchen Kottbullar – Swedish Meatballs 300g
    £3.99 £2.99
    ScandiKitchen Wild Lingonberry Jam 200g
    Rated 5.00 out of 5
    £3.29 £2.99
    Falkenberg Gravad Lax – Cured Salmon 100g
    £4.99
    ScandiKitchen Rödbetssallad – Beetroot Salad 200g (Rødbedesalat)
    Rated 5.00 out of 5
    £1.99
    Aalborg Dild Aquavit 38% – Dill Aquavit 700ml
    £34.49
    Amo Fuldkornsrugbrød – Rye Bread Mix 1kg
    Rated 5.00 out of 5
    £3.29
    Abba Grebbestad Ansjovis – Sprat fillets 125g
    £3.49

ScandiKitchen Meat Bundle

March 20, 2019

Prinskorv serving suggestion: Heat a glug og oil in a frying pan and add the Prinskorv sausages. Fry on medium heat for 4-5 minutes until heated through. Serve as a side dish in a traditional smörgåsbord.
Falukorv serving suggestion: Always remove red outer skin before eating. Slice into 1/2 cm pieces and fry in an oiled pan until hot (2-3 min per side). 

Meatballs serving suggestion: Heat a glug of oil and a bit of butter in a frying pan and add the meatballs. Fry on a medium heat for 4-5 minutes until heated through. Serve with mashed potato, gravy and lingonberry jam on the side. 

These are cooked products best eaten warm.

ScandiKitchen Prinskorv 3-Pack (3 x 300g)

Serving suggestion: Heat a glug og oil in a frying pan and add the Prinskorv sausages. Fry on medium heat for 4-5 minutes until heated through. Serve as a side dish in a traditional smörgåsbord. This is a cooked product best eaten warm.

Recipe: Beef Lindström Burgers

May 5, 2018

Hello sunshine, summer and barbecue season.

Well, it is not like we Scandinavians only BBQ in the summer. No no, we do it all year round, especially the Swedes and Norwegians who will happily step outside to grill those Wienerkorv sausages in minus 20 (it’s quite a thing in the Scandinavian ski resorts, this).

Over the next few days we will add some nice ideas for you to take to your garden and bring a bit of a Scandi flair to your BBQ.

From Bronte Aurell’s new book, ScandiKitchen Summer, comes this lovely take on the Swedish classic Biff Lindström – in her book, she decided to make them into burgers. A classic combo of ground beef and beetroot – with an egg on top. The book does not contain a recipe for the rye burger buns, so we have added those at the end here. If you can’t be bothered to bake your own burger buns, go for a nice brioche bun.

Beef Lindström Burgers

One of the most famous burgers in Sweden, the biff à la Lindström is named after Henrik Lindström, a prominent industrialist with Swedish parents, who grew up in St Petersburg in Russia. On holidays in Sweden, he taught the chef at his hotel how to make this burger with capers and beetroot/beet. It became a hit across the country – and rightly so as the combination is super-nice. The traditional way of serving these is without the bun and with potatoes on the side. We used to make it like this at home, until my burger-loving kids suggested we add a bun and have it with coleslaw one sunny day.
Sometimes, having Anglo-Scandinavian children who are not bound by ‘how things are usually done in Scandinavia’ means we can find new ways of enjoying old classics. The patties are quite fragile, so be aware of this if you plan to stick them on the BBQ.
Course: Dinner
Cuisine: Swedish
Servings: 4
Author: Bronte Aurell

Ingredients

For the burgers

  • 500 g minced/ground beef
  • a good pinch of salt
  • 1 onion finely chopped
  • 100 g pickled beetroot/beet finely chopped
  • 40 g pickled cucumber or gherkins finely chopped
  • 2 tbsp capers roughly chopped
  • 1 medium cooked white potato
 approx. 80 g/3 oz., peeled and
 roughly mashed
  • 4 egg yolks
  • 1 tsp Dijon mustard
  • salt
  • ground black pepper
  • olive oil or rapeseed oil and butter for frying
  • 4 eggs to serve

For the rye burger buns

  • 25 g fresh yeast or 13g dry active
  • 150 ml lukewarm water 36-37C
  • 150 ml lukewarm whole milk
  • 50 g light brown sugar
  • 1 egg plus ½ egg for the glaze
  • 200 g dark rye flour
  • 400 g white bread flour
  • 1 ½ tsp salt
  • 80 g soft butter
  • black or white sesame seeds to decorate
  • ½ egg to glaze

Instructions

For the Burgers

  • Put the minced/ground beef and salt in a stand mixer with the paddle attachment. Mix for around 1 minute on medium speed. Alternatively, you can mix for a little longer in a large bowl with a wooden spoon.
  • Add the onion, beetroot/beet, pickled cucumber or gherkins, capers, cooked potato, egg yolks and mustard. Season with salt and black pepper. Mix again until all the ingredients are evenly incorporated (but not too long or the burger will become tough).
  • Shape the mixture into 4 burgers and leave them to rest for 30 minutes in the fridge before frying.
  • Preheat the oven to 120°C (250°F) Gas 1/2.
  • Heat the oil and butter in a frying pan/skillet. Fry the burgers (in batches if needed, depending on the size of your pan) over a high heat for about 3–4 minutes on each side, depending on how you like your beef to be cooked.
  • Once cooked, pop the beef patties in the oven to keep warm and fry the eggs sunny-side up in the same frying pan/skillet. Serve each beef patty on a lightly toasted burger bun with the fried egg on top. Serve with summer slaw and condiments on the side.
  • To serve:
Seeded rye burger buns or buns of your choice, toasted
Summer Slaw, condiments of your choice

For the Rye Burger Buns

  • Add the yeast to a mixing bowl and then add the sugar and milk and water. Mix until everything has dissolved.
  • Add the rye flour and then start adding the white flour and salt. Add the egg and the butter. Keep kneading on a medium setting – around five minutes – adding as much flour as needed as you go. You may need more or less than stated here. Your dough should be sticky – cover with cling film and leave to rise for around an hour until doubled in size.
  • Line your baking sheets.
  • Knead the dough through and cut into 7-9 pieces depending on the sizing of your buns. Roll the pieces into even and uniform rolls and place on the baking sheet, a good distance apart (5-6 cm). Leave to rise under a damp teatowel until doubled in size again (could be another hour, but times vary).
  • Turn the oven to 180C
  • Brush the buns lightly with egg wash and add the black sesame seed (or use light brown ones, if you prefer – I just like the contrast of the dark seeds). Its always a good idea to keep the moisture in the oven when you bake these – so I always add a bowl of water to the bottom shelf of the oven.
  • Bake for about 12-14 minutes or until baked through – it depends on your oven. Remove from oven and allow to cool before using. These buns freeze well.

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