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Monthly Archives: August 2017

You Know You’re Scandi When…

August 30, 2017 | Leave a comment

You know you’re Scandi when..

  1. You wouldn’t DREAM of drinking the water from the tap without letting it run for at least 5 seconds. Otherwise you end up with the ‘pipe-water’ that has been sitting there for hours. Eugh.tap water
  2. You automatically remove your shoes when you enter someone’s house.
  3. You happily drink a glass of milk with breakfast, lunch and your evening meal (no, not dinner – the one after – kveldsmat/aftensmad).mr melk milk glass
  4. You insist on having your sandwiches topless. Less bread, more delicious filling, what’s not to like?
  5. You think 11.30am is an acceptable time to have lunch.
  6. You hoard candles for autumn and winter and secretly can’t wait for the temp to drop so you can light all of them. Hygge!hygge candles
  7. You spend hours struggling with the correct level of politeness in emails. Scandinavians are direct – in spoken as well as written language. Pardon us whilst we work on our manners.
  8. You still think it’s weird that milk comes in plastic bottles and not in cardboard.paskekrim melkekartong norwegian Easter milk carton
  9. You wonder where the crispbread section and tube cheese section in the supermarket is.
  10. Your dream Friday night is staying in and relaxing in front of a film or TV show. Tacos for dinner, sweets and snacks after.
    Pick and mix fredagsmys fredagskos
  11. You own at least 3 pairs of knitted socks from your grandma.
  12. You think liquorice, especially the very salty kind, is delicious. In chocolate, with ice cream, in vodka.
    liquorice salmiakki lakris
  13. You own at least one weatherproof jacket.allvaersjakke-norwegian
  14. You can sing all the words to Helan Går (or at least look convincing whilst you mime)
  15. You wouldn’t dream of leaving the table without saying thank you for the food – and struggle to come up with an English translation that feels the same (no we haven’t cracked that one either)

Recipe: Crispbread Pizza With Pulled Pork and Guacamole

August 24, 2017 | Leave a comment

Crispbread Pizza With Pulled Pork and Guacamole

Another lovely version of crispbread pizza - this time with pulled pork and avocado cream. Oh yes. Guaranteed to make you popular. We like the original Leksands (blue packaging) for this, but any big round will work as the toppings are so flavoursome.
Course: Dinner
Cuisine: Swedish
Keyword: crispbreads
Author: Leksands

Ingredients

  • Leksands big round crispbread
  • 100 ml  tomato sauce
  • 75 g pulled pork leftovers or ready bought
  • 1 to mato
  • 60 g mozzarella
  • handfuls Västerbotten cheese grated, or Cheddar
  • 1/2 red onion thinly sliced
  • 1 lime
  • 1 avocado
  • fresh chilli finely chopped
  • fresh coriander finely chopped
  • sea salt
  • ground pepper

Instructions

  • Pre-heat oven to 225 degrees celsius.
  • Prep the pickled onion; place thinly sliced onion in a bowl and cover with lime juice, squeezing it together with a spoon or your hand.
  • Spread the tomato sauce over the base. Add the sliced fresh tomato and chunks of pulled pork. Season with salt and pepper, then finish with the cheese.
  • Bake for approximately 10 minutes until the cheese is bubbly and slightly golden. Meanwhile, mash the avocado with the chili, coriander and lime juice - serve with a dollop of guacamole.

Thanks to our friends at Leksands for the recipe – just mildly adapted for a UK kitchen.

Recipe: Crispbread Pizza With Chicken

August 22, 2017 | Leave a comment

Crispbread Pizza With Chicken

We are big fans of using crispbread as a quick and easy pizza base. By using a round of Leksands as your base you can have pizza in 12 minutes - the mild rye flavour complements these toppings really well.
Course: Dinner
Cuisine: Swedish
Keyword: crispbreads
Author: Leksands

Ingredients

  • 1 Leksands big round crispbread
  • 100 ml  tomato sauce
  • slices roast chicken
  • 1 small onion chopped - plus butter or oil for frying
  • clove of garlic
  • Pinch of sugar
  • 60 g mozzarella
  • Good handful grated cheddar  or try it with Vasterbotten
  • 2 tbsp creme fraiche 1/2 tsp Dijon mustard and a squeeze of lemon - stirred together
  • Sea salt & freshly ground pepper

Instructions

  • Pre-heat oven to 225 degrees celsius.
  • Finely chop onion and fry in  a bit of butter until soft - add a pinch of sugar and the garlic and let caramelise. Season with salt & pepper.
  • Spread the tomato sauce over the base. Add the onion mixture, sliced fresh tomato, chicken chunks and apple - finish with the cheese.
  • Bake for approximately 10 minutes until the cheese is bubbly and slightly golden. Scatter with fresh rocket and serve with the sauce.

Thanks to our friends at Leksands for the recipe – just mildly adapted for a UK kitchen.

WIN the first Signed copy of our new book Nørth

August 17, 2017 | Leave a comment

 

WIN the first Signed copy of our new book Nørth

We’ve got a new book out in a few weeks. Nope, it is not a recipe book. Instead, we decided to put all our favourite cultural observations about Scandinavia into a book format. It’s basically our blog and newsletter – but in a big book.

With photographs by the amazing Swedish/Danish photographer Anna Jacobsen, this book is a tongue in cheek opinionated guide to what Scandinavians are like.

The official publication date is 7th September. We want one of you guys to get one of the very first copies, signed. So, to be in with a chance of winning a copy of Nørth (pronounced North) before anyone else get their hands on it, simply answer the following question:

Which of these countries have the largest population of people:

a) Sweden
b) Denmark
c) Norway

Answer to iloveherring@scandikitchen.co.uk before Tuesday 22nd August at noon. The winner will be picked at random from correct answers and the signed copy of the book will be sent out to arrive before publication date.

If you want to buy a copy, you can get your hands on the book here on Amazon (pre-orders are good for us, you know) – and after 7th September, you can get signed copies in our online shop or in store.

Usual terms apply. No alternative prize, no cash equivalent. Winner picked at random. UK only.

7 Random Facts About Surströmming

August 16, 2017 | Leave a comment

7 Random Facts About Surströmming

  1. Surströmming is made by preserving the raw herring with just enough salt to prevent it from rotting, then left to ferment for at least 6 months. A Japanese study ranks it as one of the most putrid food smells on the planet.
  2. Surströmming day is the 3rd Thursday in August – in 2018 this falls on the 16th August.
  3. Surströmming translated to sour Baltic herring. Tempting, ey?
  4. How to eat it? A common way is to have it in a ‘klämma’ – a ‘squeeze’. Take two pieces of (crunchy) flatbread and spread with sliced or crushed boiled potato, add the surströmming, squeeze and enjoy. Alternatively, place on a soft flatbread with potato, sour cream and some raw onion. Eat as a wrap. Think of it as the Swedish burrito.
  5. Whatever you do – NEVER open the tin inside. To say the smell is strong is an understatement. And it lingers.
  6. Beer and aquavit are commonly served along with it – but milk, too, is a common drink.
  7. Surströmming is so smelly it is forbidden on most airlines.

Despite (or because of – we don’t know) the smell – surströmming is very popular in Sweden, and many await the season with anticipation, dreaming about the first taste of this speciality.

Our Jonas had a chat with a lovely chap from the Telegraph a few years ago – to find out what he thought have a look at the resulting video here, or click here to read about it.

Have you tried it? What did you think? Share in comments please – we’d love to hear your thoughts on this smelly subject.

 

Recommended Products

    Mjalloms Havre Tunnbrod – Oat Flatbread 120g
    £2.59
    Mjalloms Rag Tunnbrod – Rye Flatbread 120g
    £2.59
    Oskars Surstromming *(Ship to UK ONLY) – Fermented Herring 300g
    £8.99
    Mjalloms Gammeldags Tunnbrod – Wheat & Rye Flatbread 320g
    £3.59
    Polarbrod Sarek – Thin Flatbread 8-pack
    £2.69
    Arla Gräddfil – Sour Cream 300ml
    £1.89

11 Facts About Beer in Scandinavia

August 3, 2017 | Leave a comment

11 Facts About Beer in Scandiland 

    1. In Sweden and Norway, you have to go to specialist shops to buy anything stronger than 4% (in Sweden, that’s 3.5%). In Norway, only an estimated 50% of the population live in a town or parish that has this specialist shop (aptly named the Wine Monopoly).
      Systembolaget Sweden Christmas
    2. In Norway, you cannot buy beer after 8pm Monday to Friday, or after 6pm Saturdays. Not at all on Sundays, any public holidays, and limited hours only on Christmas Eve, Pentecost Eve and New Year’s Eve. Basically, you Should learn to be very organized with your alcohol shopping in Norway – but at 7.57pm on a Wednesday, just before that Champions League match starts, you’re likely to find several stressed out people queuing in your local shop to get that 6-pack scanned before 8.
      Olsalg Norge
    3. In Norse mythology Ægir is credited as the beer-god – known for throwing frequent parties for the other gods, with copious amounts of strong beer for his guests.
    4. In 1857 there were 353 breweries in Norway – the population was only 1.5 million. Beer brewing was encouraged by the government (and failure to brew could be punished) – as drinking beer was considered better than drinking liquor.
      norsk ol norwegian beer
    5. Between 2002 and 2008, the number of breweries in Denmark grew from 19 to over 100 – a result of growing economy and popularity of craft and gourmet beers.

    6. Until Sweden joined the EU in 1995, beer with higher ABV than 5.6% was forbidden, and the government had to abolish their monopoly on wholesale meaning foreign beers were finally made available to thirsty Swedes.
      sweden eu sverige eu 1995
    7. Since the early 1970s, it has been illegal to advertise for alcohol in Norway.
      Norwegian beer advert
    8. Per capita Denmark is the biggest beer drinker in Scandinavia; consuming an average of 60.6 litres vs 52.7 and 51 litres, respectively. If we go Nordic, Finland towers over the others at 77.4 litres per capita. (The UK, for comparison, clocks in at 67.7 – Ireland at 97.5)

      European beer consumption Telegraph

      Photo: telegraph.co.uk

    9. Despite the Danes drinking more than Norwegians and Swedes, the latter two flock to their neighbour in the south to take advantage of the cheaper prices and overdo the drinking far more publicly than most Danes would.

      (Foto: BJARKE ØRSTED/SCANPIX NORDFOTO 2002)

    10. No random beer facts without this one – beer was illegal in Iceland until 1989.
      beer ban iceland celebrations
    11. After he won the Nobel Peace Prize, Dane Niels Bohr – famed for his contributions to understanding atomic structure and quantum theory – was gifted a house from brewery Carlsberg; next to the brewery, with a direct pipeline meaning Bohr had free beer on tap whenever he wanted.
      Niels Bohr Beer

Scandinavian Beers; Nils Oscar

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Scandinavian Beers; Nils Oscar

Nils Oscar’s microbrewery is located in Nyköping near Stockholm. Their beers are distributed across Sweden to both shops and restaurants – and the beers are many and varied. We stock three of these – a lager, an India ale and a rich and charismatic smoked porter. Oh yes. Here is a little introduction to our three main lines – (we sometimes also stock their seasonal beers, e.g. for Christmas).

Nils Oscar Beers

God Lager – 5.3%

The beer with the strange name – in Swedish it simply means ’good lager’, although when exported it has attracted name’s such as God’s lager or heavenly lager. God lager is the first beer produced from the brand Nils Oscar and is the best-selling microbrew in Sweden.

God lager is made with wiener malt from Germany; highly regarded in the industry. Slightly darker for a richer taste. Two types of hops are used – Spalt Select and Tettnanger – for flavor and aroma. The yeast is a German pilsner type. And together, God lager is an easy drinking but interesting beer that is equally good on its own, with salty snacks or with your meal.

India Ale – 5.3% ABV

Launched in 2005, Nils Oscar’s India Ale has won several accolades in Sweden. Nils Oscar themselves say it is almost a British Ale with American Hops; which we agree that it is. The beer has both a rich sweetness and a fruitier, bitter note from the hops – meaning it is well rounded and suits traditional as well as modern dishes, as well as being great, just as it is. Enjoy well chilled.

Rökporter – 5.9% ABV

This smoked porter is rich and complex – with notes of caramel, dried fruit and smoked charcuterie. Made with five different types of malt including caramel malt and two types of hops (Fuggles and Amarillo), this beer goes well with rich foods such as barbecued meat, and is lovely added to a meat stew or to your bread dough for richer flavour. Not an easy summer drink; save this one for the darker, colder months, where it will fit perfectly.

For a more detailed review of God Lager and Rökporter – Check out Craft Council’s review below.

 

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