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Monthly Archives: December 2014

Recipe: How to make Senapssill Mustard herring

December 19, 2014 | Leave a comment

How to make Senapssill Mustard herring

No Smörgåsbord is complete without the infamous pickled herring - and this herring dressing is as traditional as they come.
Serve the Mustard Herring with dark rye bread or crisp bread. Always serve herring at the beginning of the meal - along with a shot of chilled aquavit.
Prep Time10 mins
Total Time10 mins
Course: Starter
Cuisine: Scandinavian
Servings: 4
Author: Bronte Aurell

Ingredients

  • 220 g plain pickled herring
  • 1 tbsp white wine vinegar
  • 1 ½ tbsp sunflower oil
  • 1 ½ tbsp crème fraîche
  • 1 ½ tbsp caster sugar
  • 1 tbsp Slotts Skånsk mustard or grain mustard
  • ½ tbsp Dijon mustard
  • ½ tbsp single cream
  • 1 tbsp mayonnaise
  • 1 shallot, very finely chopped
  • 2 tbsp chopped fresh dill
  • 2 tbsp chopped fresh chives

Instructions

  • Drain the herring, discard onion bits and brine.
  • In a bowl, mix all the dressing ingredients together. Whisk until the mixture is creamy and combined, then season to taste.
  • Add the drained herring and marinate for a few hours.
  • Enjoy with rye or crisp bread.

Recipe: Rödbetsallad Apple and Beetroot Salad

December 11, 2014 | Leave a comment

Rödbetsallad Apple and Beetroot Salad

This dish is a must on most Scandi Christmas Smorgasbord tables. Mostly in Sweden, where it is absolutely essential. No beetroot salad = no Christmas.
It's super easy to make it - have a go at home, but please do try to use a Scandinavian pickled beetroot for the best result. It just works better.
Prep Time10 mins
Total Time10 mins
Servings: 4
Author: Bronte Aurell

Ingredients

Optional

  • 1 tbs chopped chives

Instructions

  • Drain the beetroot well and cut into bitesized pieces. Peel and cut apple into similar sized pieces.
  • Mix the beetroot and apple in a bowl, add mayonnaise and crème fraiche and stir. You are looking for a good creamy consistency and a medium pink colour (if the beetroot is not drained properly, you will get a runny consistency).
  • Season to taste (add sugar if using a tart variety of pickled beetroot). Add more mayo and crème fraiche, if a creamier salad is desired.
  • The colour of the salad will go darker once it sets. Leave to set in the fridge for a few hours or even overnight. If it goes too dark, just add a bit more crème fraiche or mayonnaise just before serving. If using chives, add chopped on top before serving.

Recipe: Make Nordic ‘Glogg’ mulled wine at home

December 9, 2014 | 2 Comments

Make your own 'Glögg' mulled wine at home

Glögg is an essential part of Christmas all over Scandinavia. This is recipe was created by my sister-in-law Annika in her Gothenburg kitchen. It's so very easy to make glögg at home - give it a go. You can reduce or increase the sugar to your liking - and do play around with adding and taking some spices away to make your own signature mulled wine.
Serve Nordic 'Glögg' mulled wine warm in smaller glasses with raisins and almonds.
Prep Time5 mins
Cook Time10 mins
Total Time15 mins
Course: Drink
Servings: 4
Author: Bronte Aurell

Ingredients

  • 1 bottle red wine
  • 1-2 sticks cinnamon
  • 5 g dried root ginger
  • 5 g dried Seville orange peel or other orange if you can't get Seville
  • 7 green cardamom pods
  • 15-16 whole cloves
  • 80 g/3oz sugar

To serve

  • flaked almonds and raisins

Optional

  • Splash of either vodka, aquavit, rum or cognac

Instructions

  • Pour the wine into a pan, add the spices and heat to around 80C/176F, stirring to dissolve the sugar.
  • Remove from the heat and leave to infuse for at least an hour.
  • Strain the mixture and return the mulled wine to the bottle - use a funnel to make life easier for yourself. The wine can be kept for around a week.
  • To serve, pour the wine into a saucepan and heat it.
  • Place a few flaked almonds and raisins in the bottom of your serving cups, and pour the glögg over the mixture.
  • If you want to give your glögg a kick, add a splash of either vodka, aquavit, rum or cognac just after you’ve reheated the wine.

WIN a ScandiKitchen Christmas Stocking full of goodies

December 5, 2014 | 3 Comments

We have to admit it: We LOVE our new Christmas stockings.  Richard the Designer did a good job in placing the Christmas Elk just right – and we can’t wait to hang ours by the fireplace. We believe Santa will favour anyone who hangs up a ScandiKitchen Stocking this year. The stockings are limited additions and there will be no more of this edition once they are gone. 

You can get hold of your own special stocking at the cafe shop – priced £4.95 while stocks last. If you can’t make it to the shop and you really really need one, speak to Helena at the warehouse, she has a secret stash and may be able to help you.

The stockings are nice and big (55cm long) and actually fit a whole load of stuff. Loads. A proper big Santa sized stocking indeed.

We’ve decided to fill a stocking with Scandi foodie goodies and give to one lucky winner this week. Yes, a full stocking, stuffed with everything from Christmas beers to ginger biscuits, chocolates, glogg and much more.

To be in with a chance to win, simply answer this easy question:

The animal featured on the 2014 ScandiKitchen stocking is a…

a. Penguin

b. Reindeer

c. Elk

Answer to iloveherring@scandikitchen.co.uk by email before Tuesday 9th December 2014 at noon.

One winner will be chosen at random from all correct entries.

Terms: Yes, we will send the prize to you to a UK address if you win. We will fill the stocking with goodies, all will be ambient goodies (not chilled). No alternative prize. No changes can be made to the stocking. No cheating. No cash alternative. Usual rules apply. Limited edition stockings: only 50 are for sale of these in 2014. No more will be printed in 2014.

Glögg party – how to do it the Scandinavian way

December 4, 2014 | Leave a comment

It’s December, it’s the weekend – this can only mean one thing: Glögg party.

We Scandinavians do love any excuse to pop over to each other’s house and have a tipple and some homemade cake or biscuit. Those dark December days are just perfect for this: Spend time with lovely people, letting them know you care – and serve delicious mulled wine to give everybody rosy cheeks before they head back into the cold air.

If you are in Scandinavian, you may attend 2 or even 3 of these parties in a weekend, because everybody hosts Glogg parties. You will find that the ‘Glögg’ mulled wine tends to be served in smaller cups in Scandinavia, mainly because we would otherwise be hammered by the time we reach Auntie Agneta’s house and we would, inevitably, end up making a comment about her slightly weird collection of garden gnomes. However, if you are outside Scandiland, you will probably just attend one or two a weekend, so feel free to go for it. Jut be warned: Glögg mulled wine will make your nose red like Rudolf and your ears will feel very warm. Basically, you turn into Elf if you overdo it. You’ve been warned.

Here’s how to host your own Scandinavian Glögg party this Christmas

Set the scene.

Think lots of candles, simple decorations… Hearts, spruce. No tinsel, just nice, stylish cosy Christmas decorations. Maybe a tree – but if you are going to do a tree, make it a real one. Scandinavians don’t ‘do’ fake trees. It’s better to have no tree than a fake tree. Did we mention candles? We did? Get some more. We over-do candles. Have you never seen the candle section in Ikea? Made for us and our candle obsession. If in doubt, buy some more.

Music

Think less Wham, more ABBA. Michael Buble becomes an honorary Scandi at this time a year before we put him back in the cupboard on the 28th December. Use spotify and search ‘Scandinavian Christmas’ and you should be fine. Expect a few cringe additions. Blame Spotify.

Drink

Offer your guests ‘Glögg’ mulled wine. Glögg is not the same as British mulled wine. We will claim it is infinitely better (it is) – and this is because we use cardamom, cinnamon, ginger, dried Seville orange and cloves.

You can get the spices you need at our shop – or you can buy ready-made good stuff online. Swedes swear by all Glögg from Blossa. The red top is 10%, standard and works for all. The orange top is 15% and gives you a even redder nose.  The see-through ‘Rum’ and ‘Cognac’ Blossas are 21% and you drink these in bigger glasses, in your arm chair front of the log fire. The purple bottle ‘14’ is the annual exciting new flavour – this year, it is Lavender (it’s nice, but nicer drunk a bit colder than normal Glögg).

For the kids and non alcohol drinkers, try the Glögg concentrate. We also do a Saturnus glögg at 2.2%.

To serve you glögg, heat it up so it is warm (not boiling, or the alcohol will evaporate) – and serve in little mugs of thick glasses. Add almonds and raisins.

Food

If you are doing a Danish Gløgg party, you need to make or get your hand on some Æbleskiver. These are little doughballs, made from a pancake like batter. Serve warm with jam and icing sugar.

Biscuit wise, Danes favour ‘Brunkager’ (as do Norwegians) – and Pebernødder. Both are variations of ginger biscuits.

Swedes will expect you to serve Saffron buns. Delicious yellow wheat buns. We sell them at the café but you should have a go at making some at home – they are not hard to make and they taste amazing when just fresh out of the oven.

Pepparkakor’ are the Swedish chosen biscuits – we sell them in the shop. There are many different brands, but Anna’s is the one we stock and prefer. At Christmas, they are heart shaped.

Want to make your own ginger biscuits? Get the dough and simply shape and bake. Easy peasy.

Other foods

Want to fill up the fika table? Add other buns and biscuits. Swedes like to make ‘knäck’ toffee and the Danes love to make little marzipan and nougat petit fours. You can also make ‘Chockladbollar’ or ‘Romkugler’ no-bake treats. Find the recipe on our blog.

Savoury

If you want to add a bit of a savoury element, maybe serve cheeses and crispbread. In particular, get hold of some really nice blue cheese and serve this with ginger biscuits: It’s a really, really nice combination.

Lastly, these events are usually in the afternoons, not evenings. After lunch, usually lasting a few hours, no more. Just so you can fit in 2-3 in the same day if you need to.

Happy Advent

x

 

 

 

 

 

Recipe: Lucia buns (Saffron buns)

December 3, 2014 | Leave a comment

 

Lucia buns (Saffron buns / Lussekatter)

Every year on 13th December, the Nordic people celebrate the day of St Lucia, the festival of light. On this day, originally the longest night of the year according to the Pagans, we rise early to bring in the light and break the spell of the darkness.
Processions of people singing walk, wearing long white robes tied with red sashes, through towns, holding candles and singing in the light. At the front, a Lucia bride – traditionally usually a girl but nowadays it can be both boys and girls – lead the way wearing a crown with real candles.
In Sweden and Norway, saffron flavoured wheat buns are often eaten on this day (in some places in Denmark, too). These buns have many names, the mopst common being Lussebullar (Lucia buns) or saffransbullar (saffron buns) or Lussekatter (Lucia cats – referring to the curled up shape of the buns, like a sleeping cat). We also enjoy these buns at our famous Glögg parties throughout the days of Advent. If you like saffron, you will really enjoy these – they are delicious alongside a hot cup of mulled wine.
Prep Time1 hr 30 mins
Cook Time12 mins
Total Time1 hr 42 mins
Servings: 30
Author: Bronte Aurell

Ingredients

  • 50 g fresh yeast or
  • 25 g dried active yeast
  • 1 g saffron powder (if using strands, grind and soak in the milk beforehand)
  • 400 ml whole milk
  • 150 g caster sugar
  • 200 ml plain skyr quark or greek yoghurt, room temperature
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 1 egg
  • 175 g butter soft and room temperature
  • 800 g plain bread flour
  • handful of raisins
  • beaten egg for brushing
  • 3-4 large baking sheets greased and lined with baking parchment

Instructions

  • If using fresh yeast, add the yeast and milk to a mixer with a dough hook attached. Mix until the yeast has dissolved, then add the saffron powder. If using active dried yeast pour milk into a bowl, sprinkle in the yeast and whisk together with a spoonful of the sugar. Cover with clingfilm and leave in a warm place for about 15 minutes to activate and become frothy and bubbly. Add the saffron powder.
  • Pour into a stand mixer with a dough hook attached. Add the sugar and mix together for a minute or so, then add skyr, quark or Greek yogurt, salt and egg, and mix well.
  • Gradually add the softened butter in pieces and begin to add the flour gradually while mixing, making sure to incorporate the lumps of butter. You’ll need around 800 g or so of flour, but the exact amount depends on how the dough feels. Keep mixing until you have a dough that is still sticky, but doesn’t stick to your finger too much when you poke it. Too much flour makes the buns dry – and saffron is extremely drying, so do watch it.
  • If you’re using an electric mixer, knead for about 5 minutes or knead by hand for 10 minutes. Leave the dough to rise in a warm place until it has doubled in size (about 30–40 minutes in a bowl covered with clingfilm).
  • Turn the dough out on a lightly floured surface and knead until smooth. Cut the dough into 30 equal-sized pieces. Roll each piece in your hand into a long cylinder strip, then transfer to the baking sheets and mould into an ‘S’ shape (see picture). Add a single raisin to the centre of the point where the ‘S’ shape curves (two raisins for each bun). Leave to rise again for 25 minutes.
  • Preheat the oven to 200°C (400°F) Gas 6.
  • Brush gently with egg and bake them in the preheated oven for 10–12 minutes. The buns should have a slight tinge of brown on top but not be dark. Leave to cool under a damp tea towel (this prevents them from becoming dry).
  • If you don’t eat them all in one go, freeze immediately as they go stale quickly.

Notes

This recipe is taken from Bronte Aurell’s new book ScandiKitchen Christmas (RPS, £16.99). Photo by Peter Cassidy.

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