Waffle-Day & Useful Info About Scandinavian Waffles

Posted by Martina Wade | Food & Recipes, Fun stuff, Scandi Life
vaffel med smør - scandinavian waffle

Waffle-Day & Useful Info About Scandinavian Waffles

Waffles are a big thing in Scandinavia. Thin and heart-shaped they come with a boatload of strong opinions on how to eat them, when to eat them and what to put on them. There are as many opinions as there are recipes – as many recipes as there are waffle-lovers.

One thing we all agree on is how we feel about them. Waffles are – it seems – a truly nostalgic thing. Something we all remember from our childhoods. From a fika with the family, a well deserved break in the (not-so) strenuous Sunday hike, a treat in between matches in the annual week-long summer football tournament, or from any given Wednesday at your lovely, lovely work-place (where waffles often appear on Wednesdays for some unknown reason).

You may have some questions about waffles and why we waffle (pardon the pun?) on so much about them. That’s ok. Your waffle-fears may now be put to rest – we’re here to educate you about Scandinavian waffles.

1. What is a Scandinavian waffle and how is it different from a Belgian Waffle?

A Scandinavian waffle differs from the Belgian in many ways, most notably is the shape. Scandinavian waffles are thinner, and typically consist of 4-5 heart shapes joint in a ring, as opposed to the rectangular Belgian version. Heart-shaped = even lovelier, of course.
scandinavian waffle vs belgian waffle
The batter is also different – Scandinavian waffles tend to have a less sweet batter, often with a sour component such as sour cream. They should be crispy and slightly buttery with a slightly sweet flavour.

2. Why do we celebrate the Waffle-day on the 25th of March?

Good question! Waffle-day is originally a Swedish thing, and the reason it is on the 25th of March is that the Swedish word for Waffle day – Våffeldagen – sounds very similar to ‘Vårfrudagen’ (Our lady’s day), which is the day Jesus was ‘conceived’. 25th of March = 9 months before Christmas Day.
‘But of course!’, the Swedes thought, ‘we need a dedicated waffle day but it would be confusing to have two days with such a similar sounding name. Let’s combine the two and make it one super-holiday where we can celebrate the beginning of Jesus AND eat waffles.’
(Did we mention how much we love the Swedes?) There you have it – a phonetic phenomenon is the reason for waffle-day being when it is. And some lovely Swedish logic.

3. What can I put on my waffle?

In Scandinavia, most people choose sweet toppings, including a variety of jams, whipped cream or fresh fruit and berries in summer. Waffles are not necessarily limited to sweet toppings though – try creme fraiche and smoked salmon for a lovely savoury waffle.

 

Here are 5 other ways to eat Scandinavian waffles;
  1. Waffle with brown cheese – melting, tangy/sweet brown cheese on a mildly sweet, waffle hot from the griddle. It is a beautiful thing. Top with raspberry jam for a sweeter finish. A Norwegian speciality. No, you can’t swap the jam. Some people also eat waffles with brown cheese and kaviar (yep – this stuff).
    Brunost_vaffel brown cheese waffle
  2. Hot-dog in waffle. Yep, you read that right. A steamed wiener-sausage wrapped in a sweet waffle. It’s a staple in Moss (in the middle of nowhere) and the Norwegian equivalent to a certain Gordon Ramsay is rumoured to be the man behind it, when he as a young boy worked in his uncle’s hot dog stand. Sounds odd, tastes delicious. Slightly sweet waffle paired with a savoury, meaty sausage. Yum!
    hot dog waffles
  3. Waffle with whipped cream and wild strawberries. This indulgence screams summer. Tiny, sweet, intensely flavoured wild strawberries – called smultron in Swedish with a ligthly sweetened whipped cream. Just..pure tastebud-waffle-bliss. In lack of smultron you can sub your favourite fresh seasonal fruit or berries or a good quality jam at a pinch.
    vaffel med rømme og syltetøy - waffle with sour cream and jam
  4. Waffle with butter. Yours truly – Martina, in this case – has the following method of ensuring the perfect amount of butter on the waffle; ‘Think of the little diamond dents in the waffles as windows. The goal of buttering it is to light up each window. In other words, fill each dent with lovely salted butter. This is tooth-butter meet waffle. A sprinkling of sugar if you so desire – then tuck in.
    vaffel med smør - scandinavian waffle
  5. Waffle with jam and sour cream. Your favourite sweet jam and a dollop of thick sour cream. Delicious. You will have more than one – just give in already. Napkin at the ready!
    vaffel med rømme og syltetøy - waffle with sour cream and jam

Now we want to hear your waffle-memories.

Perhaps you spent a summer frying waffles day in and day out to feed the hordes of hungry tween-agers playing football?

Or you have a favourite recipe you’d like to share? A favourite topping? Do let us know – we’d love to learn more.

Fancy waffles? We do, too.. Here’s our favourite recipe for crispy Swedish waffles, the recipe is a sneakpeek from ou new cookbook (out later this year). Or for instant waffle-satisfaction, shop our waffle mixes here – there’s even a gluten-free version there.

Comments

Payment types accepted
Secure Shopping with
Free shipping on orders over £60
£0.000 items