Tag Archives: swedish

Things that happen when you live with a Scandi

March 14, 2018 | Leave a comment


Things that happen when you live with a Scandinavian

Maybe you’ve already moved in and you’re Googling “strange things that happen when you live with a Scandinavian” – don’t worry, you’ve come to the right place for answers. Or maybe you’re thinking “Should I start sharing my home with Agneta or Henrik?” Here, we give you a heads up what things might be like in your home, if you choose to go ahead. You’ve been warned.

They make you leave your shoes in the hallway.

Everything off in the hallway – and on with a nice pair of slippers. It’s a hygiene thing (although in Denmark you can sometimes get away with it). In Sweden, they’ll make you ask your guests to take their shoes off, too. This is how it will be from now on.

Announce when it is pee-pee time

“I think I’ll go for a pee now” will become a staple sentence. Eventually, you’ll start to adopt this habit too and find yourself doing it during a meeting at your fancy non-Scandinavian office.

The heating is maxed

Despite what people think, Scandinavians hate to be cold. Your house will now be a comfortable 23-24 degrees all year around. Any less and there will be complaints.

Also, you will air the room before bed. Yes, open bedroom windows, even at minus 20c.

Re-decorating & furniture

Living with a Scandi, decorating is easy: There is only one colour to choose from (white). This colour is also applied to skirting, radiators, ceilings and floorboards. Also you probably won’t need curtains any more (at least if you live with a Dane). If you don’t have a sofa table, one will appear within a week of the move because not having a sofa table in unheard of (where will we put our coffee?!)

Also, you no longer need carpets: Start your goodbyes now.

No more nick-nacks

One by one, those little cute things you own will be replaced by stylish candle holders and sleek things. No more souvenirs from Tenerife, no more ornate fireplace clocks. Eventually, you’ll find them all in a box in the attic. Good bye.

Is it a cult?

They burn day and evenings, sometimes entire packets of tealight in one room. Don’t fear, this is not a cult; it’s just cosy. Also, you may find that 4-5 small lamps are added to each room. Because, hygge.

Your double duvet is replaced by two single ones.

This is not a declaration that the love is dead, merely that nobody will steal your duvet again and you will keep your cold feet to yourself. And wait for an invite. THIS is true love.

Specialist equipment starts to appear in your kitchen:

Exhibit 1: OSTHYVEL

For slicing cheese. What is important to know is 1) You must NEVER make a ski slope  and 2) you will never again be allowed to hack away at the cheddar with a blunt knife. Ever.

Exhibit 2: Filter Coffee Machine

Scandinavians drink more coffee than anyone else in the world. If you live with an ultra Scandi, you’ll have a MochaMaster (these brew the fastest). But any filter machine works. From now on, your coffee will be so strong you’ll be awake 19 hours a day. Coffee before bedtime (around 9 pm) becomes normal. Milk in coffee is for wimps.

Exhibit 3: Smörkniv

For butter. Never use your own, only use the designated knife for butter.

Increased Nakedness

Look, it’s a body. It’s not anything Scandinavians think is sexual: It’s skin. We don’t care. There will be nakedness. If there is a sauna, there will be nakedness there, too. You may sit next to your new Father in Law, naked. On a small flannel. Get used to it and let it all hang out.

Breakfast changes

You will have sandwiches for breakfast. And probably sour milk. But definitely sandwiches – with cheese – and jam. Together. And coffee, a lot of coffee. There will be crispy bread – and it will re-appear at lunch. And for snacks. It never, ever ends.

Dinner is at 6

Dinner is at 6. Not 6:05, but 6 pm. Except, when you invite people over,  the invite might be for 6, so therefore people must arrive at 6 pm. By 6:05 food is served. DO NOT BE LATE. for anything, ever again.


Before you eat, say ‘Velbekomme’. When you’ve finished your food, say ‘Takk for maten’ (thanks for dinner). Fail on this and you will sleep with the fishes. Also, shots of 40% alcohol with some meals will eventually become the normal (always look people in the eye when you say ‘skål’, or you’re just rude.)

Cosy days

Fridays will become cosy Fridays. You will start to share big bags of crisps (dip each chip in dip mix). There will be darkness, 117 candles and Nordic Noir. After a while, they will start to add the dreaded….

…Friday Tacos

Because: Tacos are Scandinavian, everyone knows that. Tacos = burritos, nachos, quesadillas, enchilada, chimichanga… It’s all just Tacos. All of it. But only on Fridays.

Saturday Sweets

Don’t be surprise if you after a while of living with a Scandinavian you start to consume around 550 grams of sweets every Saturday (the average). Only uncivilised people eat sweets the other six days).

Also, salty liquorice.
It’s normal. You WILL like it eventually, don’t fight it, we’re only doing it for your own good, you know… Go on, just try this little Jungle Scream, it’s not too bad…

Weekend: Hiking days

The weekends will become 48h opportunities to get outside. Seeing as there is ‘No such thing as bad weather, only bad clothes”, every weekend will be a selection of hikes, walks, runs, bikes etc. Outside, with your backpack and your “all weather jacket”. If your chosen Scandinavian is a Norwegian, he or she will make sure to pack an Orange and a bar of Kvikklunsj chocolate.

Any snow and you will hear the words: “Snow? Really? You think this is snow? When I lived in Denmark/Norway/Sweden/Finland…. “ etc.

Mid-May is Eurovision

You can try to fight it, but at some point, your Scandinavian will be found in front of the telly, Pina Colada in hand, with a score sheet and dismay when Sweden doesn’t give Denmark 12 points as planned.

Flags everywhere.

Flags are now for every occasion, but only on occasions. Birthdays = flags. Flags in cakes. Flags on sandwiches. Picking up someone at the airport = flags. Eurovision = flags. Midsummer = flags. National day = flags.

Recycle hand-in-hand

Everything. Always: Rinse and recycle. You will start to make trips to the recycling stations together. Awww.

The fridge

You may start to see strange things in tubes appear in the fridge. Or things that look like plastacine. You will start to add remoulade on every meal once the Danes are done with you.

What other things do you think might happen when you live with a Scandinavian? Add your comments below!

PSST: Want to surprise your sweetheart with the aforementioned salty liquorice or dreaded things in tubes (you may earn yourself an extra cosy Friday)? Pop by or visit our webshop if you can’t make it in.

13 Scandinavian Insults

November 2, 2017 | Leave a comment

13 brilliant Scandinavian insults

Feeling a bit annoyed, need to let some steam off? How about you do so with these rather wonderful Scandinavian insults – many of which are under used thanks to the influx of English – but they sound oh so lovely. These are just a handful from a loooong list, we had to stop somewhere. Give it a go and tell us if there are any of these you use, or any we have missed.

  1. Klossmajor (Danish, Norwegian) – Lit. Brick major – Someone super clumsy.
  2. Juksemaker pipelort (Norwegian) – Lit. Cheat maker pipe poo – Someone who cheats. The second half usually only added on by children.

  3. Snuskhummer (Swedish) – Lit. dirty lobster – used about dirty (old?) men staring at girls.
  4. Snoronga (Swedish, has Danish and Norwegian equivalents) – Lit. Snot child – someone snotty and spoilt; a brat.
  5. Klaptorsk (Danish) – Lit. Clapping cod – Someone doing something very stupid; much like a cod attempting to clap .
  6. Vatnisse (Danish, Norwegian) – Lit. cotton gnome – someone silly (with cottonwool for brains, perhaps)


  7. Narhat (Danish) – Lit. Fool’s hat – someone so stupid they’re not even worthy being called a fool, just the fool’s hat.
  8. Skitstövel (Swedish) – Lit. Shit boot – someone full of shit.
  9. Kronidiot (Norwegian) – Lit. Crown idiot – As stupid as you can get. The leader of the idiots.
  10. Korkad (Swedish) – Lit. Corked – Someone stupid.
  11. Bytting (Norwegian) – Lit. Swapee (ie. Being swapped) – someone so stupid or evil you think they have been swapped for someone from the underworld.
  12. Dumbom (Swedish) – Lit. Stupid barrier – Barriers are, in general, stupid because they are blocking the way, right? So a stupid-barrier is an insult you do not want thrown after you.
    dumbom barrier
  13. Mehe (Norwegian) – Lit. from Medhenger, meaning ‘with-hanger’ – someone who just follows and can’t think for themselves.Followers Mehe

How to Enjoy Autumn like a Scandi

October 18, 2017 | Leave a comment

How to Autumn like a Scandi

Or what we think about when it is biting cold, rainy and dark. It is the little things. From the smell of your coffee in the morning, to the fact that you can wear your old bright knitted socks that grandma made and perhaps spend some hours in the kitchen baking with cinnamon. Let’s go on…

  1. Autumn is the perfect time to go full fledged HYGGE. Candles EVERYWHERE.
  2. We can finally wear all the knitted socks we own…

  3. …and our (Christmas) jumpers
  4. We can eat lovely traditional food such as Fårikål (lit. Mutton in cabbage – Norway’s national dish; mutton or lamb stewed with cabbage and peppercorns and not much else) and Korv Stroganoff (the Swedish sausage version of the stew named after a 19th century Russian count).
  5. ..and cover everything in cinnamon. Buns, apple cakes, porridge, crispbread..yum! 
    cinnamon buns - cinnamon rolls - skillingsboller
  6. We can go hiking like a Norwegian in bright, weatherproof jackets, with a Kvikk Lunsj to match. They taste best when enjoyed outside in the fresh air, you know (and on the inside, contains the Norwegian rules of the mountain to help you stay safe. If you can read Norwegian, that is).

  7. We can FINALLY wear our Sydvests (sou’westerns).

  8. And we finally don’t have to defend our multiple-cups-of-coffee-by-9am habit – the colder dark mornings being the perfect excuse.  
  9. Fredagsmys is back on the agenda; It is, year round – but in summer sometimes UTEPILS takes precedent (Utepils = the Norwegian concept of enjoying a beer outside whenever there is a sliver of sunshine and warmth in the air (read; warmer than 4 degrees)

    Fredagsmys fredagskos 
  10. And, some say it is a bit early, but it still makes us happy to start planning our Glögg parties…

  11. …and our gingerbread baking competitions..

    Just your casual Scandi gingerbread house production.

    (We know, we KNOW! The last two are strictly for The season that shall not yet be named. But when autumn is grey, dark and cold it is nice to let yourself be just a teeny bit excited about the next thing. We can almost smell the glögg! No, it is not too soon – we have some already..)

What else do you like about autumn? Anything we missed, pop it in the comments please.

Cinnamon Bun Recipes

September 27, 2017 | Leave a comment

Our Favourite Cinnamon Bun Recipes

There are as many cinnamon bun recipes as there are parents and grandparents – each claiming theirs to be the ultimate one, producing the softest, most cinnamon-y, comforting little bakes ever. But really – how wrong can you go when it comes to cinnamon buns? We are yet to meet a bun we didn’t enjoy.

Here are some of our favourite recipes – in no particular order.

  1. Classic Cinnamon Buns. Our go to dough for buns – sometimes filled with cinnamon, other times jazzed up with chocolate Always delicious – and easy to do.
  2. Filled Vanilla Buns. 6 different ways to fill a classic bun dough – we particularly love the blueberry version.
  3. Social Cinnamon Bun ‘Wreath’ – a lovely variation on the classic buns in a lovely big sharing version.
  4. Scandi Saffron Buns. Fragrant and aromatic – these are traditionally enjoyed in early December for St. Lucia – but they taste just as good now.
    Cinnamon Twists Bronte Aurell ScandiKitchen

    Phoro credit: Peter Cassidy, for Ryland Peters.

Vanilla buns, six ways.


Vanilla buns, six ways

Once you are bored with cinnamon buns, where do you go?

Vanilla is where it’s at. This week, we decided to make a few different versions using the same base dough and basic filling.

There are as many recipes for buns in Sweden as there are people who bake them. We like this one: it’s simple, it’s straightforward and it just works. It forms a great base from which to experiment with your own flavours and fillings. The addition of egg to the dough makes the dough richer than usual. We’ve upped the butter, too – again, you can reduce it but we think it works well with the vanilla.

This recipe makes about 36 Vanilla buns of medium size.

Dough Ingredients

50g fresh yeast

500ml whole milk, luke warm

200g very soft butter (melted also fine)

80g caster sugar

1000 g plain bread flour (or between 800-1000g, depending on the flour)  – we always use Swedish Vetemjol flour for perfect results.

1⁄2 tsp salt

2 tsp ground cardamom

1 egg


Filling for Vanilla buns (filling #1, used also in 2-5)

175g butter (soft, spreadable)

4-5 tsp vanilla sugar (we prefer torslefs vanilla sugar)

Seeds from one vanilla pod

150g normal sugar

1 egg for brushing

100-150g of pearl sugar to decorate


The dough:

Heat the milk to 36-41 degrees and add in a bowl with the yeast, stir until dissolved. Add the butter, sugar, salt, cardamom, egg and enough flour to make the dough combine. You’ll need about 700-800g of flour – but add a little at the time, keeping the mixer on continuously (using the dough hook). Keep the rest of the flour back for kneading. Work the dough until it almost stops sticking and has a shiny surface – about 6-7 minutes with a mixer, longer by hand (add more flour if you need to). The dough should only just reach the point of not being sticky.

While the dough is rising, whisk butter and vanilla together until smooth and spreadable.

Leave dough to rise until it’s doubled in size (30-40 mins). Work through with more flour until dough stops sticking and can be shaped, then cut the dough in half and roll out the first piece in a rectangular shape (around 45cm x 35cm). Spread a generous amount of the vanilla butter evenly, then roll the piece lengthways so you end up with a long, tight thin roll. Cut 18 slices of the dough and place each swirl onto your baking tray – a good space apart from each other as they will rise again.

Repeat with second half of dough. Leave to rise for 20 minutes.

To make buns with the rest of the the dough:

Turn the oven to 220 degrees (a bit less if using a fan oven).

Brush all buns gently with remaining egg (you may need a bit more egg) and sprinkle a bit of pearl sugar on each bun. Bake at 220°C for about 8-10 minutes (turn the heat down a bit midway if you feel they’re getting too brown) for the buns – but for the longer rolls, turn the heat down slightly and bake nearer the bottom of the oven for around 20 minutes – take care not to burn them. As this dough contains sugar, the buns can go dark brown in a split second, so keep an eye on them.

As soon as the buns come out of the oven, cool down under a damp, clean tea towel to stop them going dry. If you prefer a stickier surface, brush with a light sugar syrup or normal light syrup as soon as they are baked.

The buns freeze well (freeze in plastic bags as soon as they have cooled).


Filling option #2

Vanilla and Crème Patisserie

Either make a batch of crème patisserie or simply make a portion of instant vanilla creme – whisk 400ml whole milk with 1 sachet of power, leave to stand for 15 minutes and its ready to use.

Follow recipe as above – but before rolling the buns tight, spread a thin layer of vanilla cream across the dough, then roll and proceed as recipe.

Filling option #3


With or without the vanilla crème, add fresh or frozen blueberries to the dough before rolling. Simply scatter a handful of blueberries and then roll and slice.

Filling option #4

Tart berries

With out without the vanilla crème, add fresh cloudberries (or frozen) to the dough before rolling. Simply scatter a small amount of berries across, roll and slice.

Filling option #5

Marzipan & Vanilla knots

Roll dough out and in the recipe. Take half a packet of Mandelmasse, marzipan (or similar graded marzipan) and grate about 100g across the dough. (after you have added the vanilla sugar)

Instead of rolling the dough, simply fold it in half lengthways – then cut into 18 strips and make bun ‘knots’. You can check out this video for hints of how to make bun knots – it’s surprisingly easy and it distributes the filling well.

Filling option #6

‘Skoleboller’ – School buns.

Most popular in Norway, these buns are super lovely. For this version, you do not need the vanilla sugar – but you do need the crème patisserie.

Shape the dough into 36 round balls and place on baking trays. Press each ball a bit flat and make an indent in the middle. Add a large teaspoon of vanilla crème patisserie to each bun and leave to rise for about 15 minutes. Bake as directed in recipe.

Once removed from oven, let cool for a bit then pipe out some icing (icing sugar mixed with a teeny bit of warm water) on each bun. Place your desiccated coconut in a soup bowl and dip the bun, icing side down, into the coconut.



Zesty Prawn Crispbread Pizza

September 14, 2017 | Leave a comment

Prawn Pizza With Zesty Gremolata

A fresh and zingy pizza with plenty of flavour from fresh herbs, lemon zest, a mix of cheeses and fresh prawns.

  • 8 pieces Leksands triangle crispbread (or 1 round)
  • 100ml tomato sauce
  • 1 small onion + butter/oil for frying
  • 50ml ricotta
  • handful finely chopped basil
  • 60g mozzarella
  • Big handful grated cheese (e.g. Vasterbotten)
  • 2 handfuls finely chopped parsley, zest from 1 small lemon, 1 garlic clove grated – mixed to a Gremolata
  • Big handful peeled prawns
  • Seasalt and black pepper

1. Pre-heat oven to 225 degrees celsius.
2. Finely chop onion and fry in a bit of butter until soft – add sugar and let caramelise. Season with salt & pepper.
3. Spread the tomato sauce over the base. Add the onion, basil and ricotta – finish with the mozzarella and grated cheese.

Bake for 10 mins or until the cheese is bubbly and slightly golden. Top with prawns and gremolata – serve immediately.



Zesty Prawn Pizza

Thanks to our friends at Leksands for the recipe – just mildly adapted for a UK kitchen.

Tricolore Mediterranean Crispbread Pizza

September 12, 2017 | Leave a comment

Crispbread Pizza ‘Tricolore’ With Mediterranean Flavours

Autumn in Scandinavia means foraging – for berries, fruits and mushrooms – so seasonal dishes often centre, or include, around these ingredients. Mushrooms are a favourite – especially the more elusive girolles (chantarelles). The following recipe is adapted for supermarket foraging – but feel free to use any mushroom you like.

  • 8 round Leksands crispbread
  • 100ml tomato sauce
  • 1 small onion + butter/oil for frying
  • 3-4 anchovy fillets in oil
  • 8-12 good quality black olives
  • 1 tbsp small capers
  • Finely chopped fresh chili (seeds removed)
  • 2 handfuls finely chopped parsley, zest from
  • 1 garlic clove grated
  • 4 cherry tomatoes, halved
  • 60g mozzarella + handful grated cheddar
  • Seasalt and black pepper, rocket to serve.

1. Pre-heat oven to 225 degrees celsius.
2. Finely chop onion and fry in a bit of butter until soft – add pinch of sugar and let caramelise. Season with salt & pepper.
3. Spread the tomato sauce over the base. Add the onion, chopped anchovies, olives, garlic, tomatoes and chili – finish with the mozzarella and grated cheese, season with pepper.

Bake for 10 mins or until the cheese is bubbly and slightly golden. Top with rocket and serve immediately.



Tricolore Pizza

Thanks to our friends at Leksands for the recipe – just mildly adapted for a UK kitchen.

Bacon & Mushroom Pizza

September 9, 2017 | Leave a comment

Crispbread Pizza With Bacon & Mushroom

Autumn in Scandinavia means foraging – for berries, fruits and mushrooms – so seasonal dishes often centre, or include, around these ingredients. Mushrooms are a favourite – especially the more elusive girolles (chantarelles). The following recipe is adapted for supermarket foraging – but feel free to use any mushroom you like.

  • 1 round Leksands crispbread
  • 100ml tomato sauce
  • 1 small onion + butter/oil for frying
  • 75g oyster mushroom
  • 1 garlic clove
  • 50g bacon or pancetta, fried until crispy
  • 1 egg yolk
  • 60g mozzarella + big handful grated cheddar
  • rocket salad to serve
  • Seasalt and freshly ground black pepper

1. Pre-heat oven to 225 degrees celsius.
2. Finely chop onion and fry in a bit of butter until soft – add pinch of sugar and let caramelise. Season with salt & pepper.
3. Chop the mushroom and fry until golden.
4. Spread the tomato sauce over the base. Add the onion, mushroom and your meat – finish with the mozzarella and grated cheese. Season with salt and pepper.

Bake for 10 mins or until the cheese is bubbly and slightly golden. Top with whisked egg yolk and rocket salad – serve immediately.



Bacon & Mushroom Pizza

Thanks to our friends at Leksands for the recipe – just mildly adapted for a UK kitchen.

7 Random Crispy Facts

September 7, 2017 | Leave a comment

7 Random Facts About Crispbread

  1. Crispbread is common across Scandinavia, but especially so in Sweden, followed closely by Norway. 85% of all Swedish households have it at all times.
  2. Crispbread is Sweden’s second largest export – second only to Absolut vodka.
  3. Your average Swedish munches through 5.5 kg of crispbread every year – and crispbread is amongst the most missed food products for Swedes abroad. It may not sound much, but considering an average crispbread weighs about 12 grams, this equates to 458 slices every year. A crispbread a day keeps the doctor away.
  4. What.. IS crispbread? Crispbread is traditionally made with only wholegrain rye, yeast, salt and water, although these days you have a wide range of variety ranging from all-wheat to all nut and seed (to purist, these don’t count). However, when you say crispbread, most people will still think of your classic rye crispbread.
  5. In Scandinavia, crispbread is treated as any other type of bread. It can be topped with almost anything, and is a common part of breakfast, lunch, dinner or snacks in between.
  6. Super versatile, you can have crispbread at every meal. Crushed over a bowl of yoghurt, maybe with some berries, for a naturally low sugar, high fibre and delicious granola for breakfast; topped with smoked salmon and cream cheese for lunch; used as pizza base for dinner (oh yes, crispbread pizza is a thing and it’s delicious. In Sweden you can even buy ready made frozen crispbread pizzas).
  7. In the UK, crispbread is often thought about in one of two ways; 1; as a cracker for cheese or 2; diet food. This saddens our crispy Scandi hearts and tummies. Because; crispbread is absolutely great with cheese, and is definitely much better for you than mass produced wonderbread – but Scandis eat crispbread because it is tasty (and you can top it with anything you like), convenient (it keeps forever) and good for you. You could eat 4 triangles of crispbread for every slice of white bread – and thanks to the high fibre content you will stay fuller for a lot longer. Meaning you may be able to resist that cinnamon bun later. Or not. But that’s ok. Balancing your crispbread with cinnamon buns is what the Swedes would call ‘lagom’.

Now, pass us the crispbread someone. Fancy some? Find our crispbreads here.

Crispbread as base = pizza in 10 minutes.

Salmon & Dill Pizza

| Leave a comment

Crispbread Pizza With Salmon & Dill

Hej hej, another quick and easy crispbread pizza recipe. This time flavoured with two Scandi staples – salmon and dill. Dillicious. By using a round of Leksands as your base you can have pizza in 12 minutes – and the mild rye flavour works really well with the salmon. An added bonus is, of course, that it is actually good for you! Win win win. Win.

You will need:

  • 1 round of Leksands crispbread OR 8 pieces Leksands triangle crispbread
  • 100ml tomato sauce
  • 1 small onion, chopped – plus butter or oil for frying
  • 75g hot smoked salmon
  • 60g mozzarella
  • Zest from 1/2 lemon
  • 1 tbsp browned butter
  • fresh dill
  • Freshly grated horseradish (from a jar will work in a pinch)
  • Good handful grated cheddar (or try it with Vasterbotten)
  • Sea salt & freshly ground pepper

1. Pre-heat oven to 225 degrees celsius.
2. Finely chop onion and fry in a bit of butter until soft – add a pinch of sugar and the garlic and let caramelise. Season with salt & pepper.
3. Spread the tomato sauce over the base. Add the onion and the salmon in smaller chunks – finish with the mozzarella and grated cheese. Season with pepper.

Bake for approximately 10 minutes until the cheese is bubbly and slightly golden. Top with lemon zest, grated horseradish and a drizzle of browned butter, if liked.



Salmon & Dill Pizza

Thanks to our friends at Leksands for the recipe – just mildly adapted for a UK kitchen.

Payment types accepted
Secure Shopping with
Free shipping on orders over £60
£0.000 items