Tag Archives: Sweden

Semla Season 2017 – Everything You Need To Know

January 26, 2017 | Leave a comment

 

Semla Season 2017 – Everything You Need To Know

After Christmas we always feel determined to start a new and healthier life – less chocolate and more spinach, but only until we remember the next big occasion in the Scandi baking calendar; Semla season. Semla is the Swedish answer to pancake-day pancakes, but in our completely unbiased opinion; a million miles better and far too good to only eat once per year.

We started selling these chubby marzipan and cream filled buns of glory in the café a few weeks ago – and as we are now only 1 month away from the big day, it is time to kick off and remind each other what the Semla is all about. We have collated some essential reading (all the important semla-facts), our favourite recipes, and our very own semla product bundles if you want to give them a go at home without the hassle of seeking out the products you need. Ah, you’re welcome. Public semla-service is what we do.

– 12 Things You Need To Know About Semlor –

– Princess Semlor – The 2017 Luxury Semla – Recipe –

Princess Semla Recipe Image

Classic Semlor – Swedish Marzipan Cream Buns – Recipe

Classic Semlor Recipe


 

Fancy doing some baking? Try our kits to get started;

    Prinsess Semla Bun – Bundle
    £25.20 £24.90
    - +
    Cinnamon Bun – Product Bundle
    £9.80 £9.50
    - +
    Bake Your Own Semlor – Product Bundle
    £11.90
    - +

 

Now, promise you try one. Come say Hej and have a coffee and semla with us in our café or make your own, just don’t go without. They are too good to be missed.

Swedish Cheesecake – Ostkaka – Recipe

January 18, 2017 | Leave a comment

Swedish Cheesecake (Ostkaka)

If you’re looking for one of those sweet Americans style cheesecakes, forget it. This is the much less sweet Swedish version – ‘Ostkaka’ – which simply means cheesecake. It is a really old Swedish traditional favourite, first mentioned in the 16th century – it’s that old.

The original version requires you to go buy some rennet and make milk curds from scratch, but cottage cheese works well too, so that’s what I use in my version. Indeed, most people use cottage cheese nowadays except purists. I’d say this cheesecake is not dissimilar to the ones you get in Northern Spain, in the Basque Country – and, like the Spanish ones, work well with a glass of sweet sherry on the side. This recipe is naturally gluten free.

This cheesecake is served lukewarm, never cold and never hot. Most people enjoy it with a dollop of strawberry or cloudberry jam on top, although I prefer a quickly made compote and some fresh berries.

The recipe fits a standard brownie tray, approx 20 x 20 or similar, but you can use any sort of dish or even a spring form. Just don’t forget to line the dish.

Ostkaka with hallon (raspberries)
  • 3 eggs
  • 75g caster sugar
  • 400g natural cottage cheese
  • 100ml double cream
  • 50 g ground almond
  • 1 tsp vanilla sugar or vanilla bean paste
  • Pinch of salt
  • 1 tsp almond essence (optional)
  • 50g flaked almonds
  • Dusting of ground cardamom
For the topping:
  • 125g raspberries
  • 2tbsp sugar
  • Dash of water
How to:

Turn the oven to 160 degrees celsius fan (170 degrees normal).

Whisk the sugar and egg until light and fluffy. Add all the ingredients apart from the flaked almonds and cardamom and pour into your prepared tin.

Scatter the flaked almonds on top, then dust the tiny bit of ground cardamom (less than 1/2 tsp – it’s just for a bit of flavour).

Place in the oven and bake until set and slightly golden on top. This depends on your oven – but around 30-40 mins is a good guideline.

To make the topping: Place 100g raspberries in a saucepan, add the sugar and a dash of water and boil until the raspberries have broken down and it looks like a runny jam. Leave to cool. Use the remaining berries to decorate.

Kalles Kaviar – The Legend, The Myth, The Breakfast Topper

January 12, 2017 | Leave a comment

Kalles Kaviar – Everyday Hero #1

This is the first of six posts – each presenting one of our favourite everyday products. The things we eat again and again and that always provide a taste of home.

Open a random Swedish fridge and chances are you’ll find at least one blue and yellow tube of creamed cod roe with a smiley blonde on the pack. Creamed cod roe..may not sound very appetising, but its slightly salty, savoury mild taste makes it an excellent addition to your egg-sandwich – and this, indeed, is how most people enjoy it.

We have shared the recipe on this Swedish delicacy before – check it out here; Kalles Kaviar 3 Ways.

Kalles Kaviar Kaviar

What’s the fuss about you may ask? Well let us tell you how it all started (drumwhirl please)..
Kalles Kaviar was launched in Sweden in 1954, and is based on several hundred years old recipe from the Swedish west coast. Its iconic blue and yellow tube has changed little since then, and is a much-loved sight for a Swede in need of some TLC. No one is quite sure who to credit for the recipe, which was bought by Abba from a peddler for around 1000SEK – a small fortune in the 50s.

The mystery of Kalles remains to this day – not least to non-Swedes, who struggle to find anything lovable about this little bit of Sweden in a tube – well, maybe apart from Kalles’ smiley self.

Fancy some? Order some Kalles and some crispbread today and we’ll send it straight to you – your Swedish breakfast dreams will soon be answered.

    Abba Kalles Kaviar Original – Smoked Cod Roe 190g
    £3.20
    - +
    Leksands Brungraddat – Brown Baked Crispbread 830g
    £4.35
    - +

 

Foodie habits that Scandies don’t realise are… weird

January 8, 2017 | Leave a comment

 

So, we have our little food quirks. Aside from all the really weird stuff like fermented herring and smoked sheep’s head, we have little habits that other nations sometimes find a little, well, a little peculiar….

Food in tubes.

Especially cod roe, that is a huge favourite among Swedes and Norwegians. For breakfast. With boiled egg.

KallesKaviar

Remoulade with everything.

Danes especially love remoulade, a type of curried pickle mayonnaise sort of thing. Enjoy it with chips (nope, not ketchup), breaded fish, roast beef, on pate, on meatballs, on everything they can think of, actually.

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Tacos on Fridays

Scandinvians LOVE Tacos. It’s a Friday thing. For Swedes and Norwegians, it’s every Friday, too.

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Everything is referred to as Tacos, it’s so much easier than learning your burrito from your enchilada from your fajita. Just call it all Tacos. All of it. Even the nachos are called Tacos on Friday evenings. Also, must be served with chopped cucumber pieces (a combination somewhat strange to Mexico).

In Sweden, go one better and have Taco Pie.

It’s a Taco Quiche. Well done, Sweden.  Photo: Ica, Sweden

TAcoPaj (ica sweden)

Jam and cheese.

For breakfast, enjoy a nice treat of bread, cheese and a dollop of strawberry jam.

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Liquorice.

It’s not a silly fad: It is our life. Live with it. And we will ALWAYS try to make you taste it, only to find that you will never understand our love of salty, tar-like ‘sweets’.

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Gammel Dansk

This is Danes only. A 38% alcohol drink, made from a secret blend of 29 herbs. Danes like to drink this in shots. In the morning. With breakfast. Older Danes have a saying: ‘One shot for each leg’.

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While in Norway

they have freshly baked waffles. Topped with brown goats cheese – and jam.

Photo: Matprat.

MATPRAT Vafler brunost

Dip your chip

All our crisps (potato chips ) MUST be dipped in a sour cream dip dressing, usually named something exotic such as ‘holiday dip’. Every single crisp must be dipped.

dipmix

Want to know something else?

In Denmark, sometimes, crisps are served with the main meal. On the plate. Add gravy. Yes, it’s a real thing (but mainly for Christmas and Grandma’s birthday).

franke kartofler

Spaghetti & Ketchup for dinner

Yes, even grown ups at times. We LOVE it. We need nothing more.

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Pickled herring.

Nope, we really don’t think it is weird to eat pickled herring on crispbread or rye bread.

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Ah, and the delicious Kebab Pizza.

Pizza – topped with shavings of kebab meat – and dressing.

kebabpizza

And in Sweden, the hotdogs are often topped with prawn mayonnaise. AND ketchup and mustard.

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When in Norway, they have waffle hotdogs, too. Yes they do.

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Photo – coop.no

And in Sweden, black pudding

– with jam. Lingonberry jam. It’s a thing.

blodpudding

We all love a bit of cold rice pudding. In Norway and Sweden topped with orange segments (especially those from a tin) – and cherry sauce in Denmark. We eat this for Christmas.

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Back in Sweden, people eat Sandwich Cakes.

Bread, mayo, filling of choice, bread, mayo, more filling, decorate with every shred of your imagination. Set. Slice. You’re the hero.

smorgastarta

We eat so much pork liverpate

We buy it in half kilo packages. Huge. And then we add so much pickled cucumber on it you can’t taste the pate (get some here).

leverpostej

Flying Jacob

The Swedish Dish that people are often not quite sure is actually real – but it is: Chicken baked with cream, curry, chilli ketchup, bananas… Then topped with bacon bits and peanuts. Serve with rice.

flying jacob

Open sandwiches don’t seem to strange now, eh?

 

Swedish Meatball Sandwich – Recipe

October 6, 2016 | Leave a comment

Swedish Meatballs With a Chance of Lingon

We love meatballs. Who doesn’t? A meatball a day keeps the doctor away, and so on.

Aside from the usual preparation, meatballs with creamy mash, cream sauce and sharp lingonberries (we have a lovely recipe for a meatball dinner here), we like eating them as a sandwich.

Here’s our simple Meatball Sandwich;

Swedish Meatball Sandwich Step by Step

  1. Start by cutting your meatballs into smaller chunks and fry them on medium heat in a little butter to make the edges go golden crisp, until they are warmed through. They’re already cooked so no need to cook them for very long.
  2. Then grab a plate and place 1 round polarbrod on it; we like it toasted but it doesn’t have to be. Spread a little salted butter on. Add a green leaf if you want. Spinach or rocket is good, or just plain lettuce. It adds a bit of freshness and crunch.
  3. Spread the beetroot salad on top your bread, approximately two tablespoons.
    Variation; Swap pickled red cabbage for the beetroot.
  4. Finish by adding your warm meatballs, some chopped chives and perhaps lingonberry jam, although we tend to think the sweetness from the beetroot salad is enough in this instance.
  5. Add a good sprinkling of salt and pepper to finish.

Sit down. Grab a knife and a fork and enjoy. ‘Mums filibaba’, as a Swede would say! (it means Yummy!).

Fancy making this? We have a bundle for you:

    Swedish Meatball Sandwich
    £6.75
    - +
    Per i Viken Farmors Köttbullar – Meatballs 8-Pack
    £2.95
    - +
    Felix Lingon – Wild Lingonberry Jam 283g
    £2.15

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Join Our Family – We Are Currently Recruiting

August 10, 2016 | Leave a comment

Join Our Family – We Are Currently Recruiting

We at ScandiKitchen have a passion for our smorgasbord, great coffee, crispbread and all things Scandinavian. Singing Eurovision songs and brewing coffee – it is a passion always in fashion.

We are currently looking for more superheroes to join our team and give our customers the best experience in our lovely café.  So we just wanted to introduce ourselves a bit:

sk cafe youtube

We have been up and running since 2007 – yeah that’s right, almost 10 years of us dancing around in our café on Great Titchfield Street in London to offer you the best of Scandinavia. So when working for us you can expect to have a lot of fun and things like this:

  • You will get excellent training in Scandinavian random facts
  • Eat a lot of meatballs
  • Crispbread is holy
  • Meet our awesome customers
  • Be part of our team – we are one big family

On a more serious note: we will offer you a great experience in a fast paced environment, opportunity to evolve in our growing company, customer service experience and to take part in shaping our organisation.

swedish chef

 

Are you our next superhero? Put your cape on and press here to read more about the vacancies and how to apply.

 

It Is Time For Summer Fika

July 14, 2016 | Leave a comment

It Is Time For Summer Fika

Scandinavian people love their coffee. Norwegians are in the top of coffee consumption but Sweden and Finland consume the most cups of coffee per day in the world. So to say the least – Scandinavians are well caffeinated!

coffee drinking gif

But when having a Fika in the summer it is sometimes nice to cool down with a cold drink. If there is no ice coffee available Scandinavians love to make a jug of ‘saft’ – cordial. This cold drink matches any favourite nibbles such as cookies, pastries or cinnamon buns. What Fika truly stand for and what you need to have to create the best Fika moment you can find here. And here you can find 10 ways to Fika so that you can find your new favourite.

jordgubbssaft

Now we want to brew some coffee and make a jug of ‘saft’ – don’t you?

It Is Waffle Weekend

June 30, 2016 | Leave a comment

It Is Waffle Weekend – Scandinavian Waffles (again)

We love waffles, we love to talk about them a lot –  and we are going to talk about them some more. Here are some tips for how you can eat them this summer.

Waffle maker with toppings

 

Nothing implies summer more than warm newly made waffles – topped with whipped cream and jam. But there are a variety of different toppings that can go on a waffle – here you can read more about the different ways to eat waffles.

Waffles with whipped cream and jam

And here is a lovely recipe for our favourite waffles.

Yummy, this make us want to have some waffles now – don’t you?

Our favourite Viking facts

April 7, 2016 | Leave a comment

Our favourite Viking facts

We are proud to come from the lands of the Vikings. Here are some great facts about our forefathers that we’ve collected this week.

Lots of us watched the excellent BBC documentary this week called The Vikings Uncovered with Dan Snow and Sarah Parcak  – highly recommend if you get the chance to see it.

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  • Viking is something you do, not something you are. The word Viking comes from the people from the Vik, (vik means bay). People who would sail off to other places were ‘going viking’. The word Viking wasn’t used in English until 19th Century – before this, we were just known as ‘Norsemen’ or ‘Danes’.
  • The Vikings came from Sweden, Norway and Denmark. It was not known as one or several nations to the Vikings themselves – this definition came later. Lots of tribes and settlements that often fought each other when not busy travelling.
  • The first Vikings in the UK landed at Lindisfarme in 793. The stories from this visit are not particularly friendly and doesn’t portray the Norse men in a very favourable light. After this, the Vikings settled over much of England, Scotland and Ireland. There may have been some disagreements with locals at times, but we found a way around it.
  • No Vikings ever wore a helmet with horns. Ever.
  • North America was first visited by Leif Eriksson in around year 1000. They called it Vinland. Leif was the son of Erik the Red (Eiríkr hinn rauði) who was an all round pretty nasty guy having been banished from Scandinavia to Iceland for being too violent. Erik the Red was likely very ginger, hence his name.
  • Ginger Viking was then in exile from Iceland for 3 years due to ‘a few murders’ and spent this time exploring Greenland. This resulted in the first big marketing ploy in history: Erik marketed Greenland as ‘green and fruitful’, encouraging people to join him in settling there. Once they got there, they were not pleased, but they made the best of it, whilst Erik went back to Iceland.

viking-countries-were-vikings-raided

  • The Vikings settlements and journeys stretched from New Foundland all the way to the Middle East. We picked up spices in Constantinople, travelled through Kiev… Even made it to Jerusalem.
  • The Viking Age is commonly considered to have ended with the death of Harald Hardrada at the Battle of Stamford Bridge in 1066.

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  • Viking women could divorce their husbands quite easily – for reasons including ‘displaying too much chest hair’. After a divorce, men were required to pay maintenance. Women could also inherit property.
  • The word Beserk is a noun used to describe a Norse warrior who fought with uncontrolled ferocity – known as a Beserker. It comes form the Norse word ‘Beserkr’, from berr (bare i.e. without amour) and serkr (coat) .

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  • A long boat could travel up to 200km a day. The Vikings also had slower passenger and cargo ships called knörr (nothing to do with stock cubes).
  • A Viking long boat could take around 30,000 hours to build and wood from around 15 fully grown trees. They were usually built from oak – and 4000 nails.
  • Vikings used a liquid to start fires. They’d boil touchwood from fungus in urine for several days and then pound it into something similar to felt. The sodium nitrate would mean the felt would smother rather than burn, so they could bring fire along with them.
  • The traditional Northern English greeting “‘Ey up” is Viking – it comes from ‘se opp’ (look up).
  • Icelandic genetics today show a lot of British trace – suggesting that the Vikings picked up British and Irish people along their way there. The Vikings were active slave traders – slaves were known as Thralls and sold on markets across the world.
  • The word Bluetooth comes from Harald Bluetooth, who was really good at making people get on with each other and ‘connect’. The symbol we use for Bluetooth today is actually runes for his initials.

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  • The Vikings were really clean people, especially compared to, say, the English at the time. The Vikings had baths on Saturdays (the word Lørdag, Saturday, comes from the Norse word Laug = ‘bath’’. In England, the Vikings had a reputation for excessive cleanliness.
  • Viking Men ‘preferred’ being blonde – some dark-haired men would bleach their hair (and sometimes beards) blonde using lye. (This also helped keep lice away – a total bonus).
  • Vikings worshipped the Norse god of skiing and also loved skiing for fun. God of Skiing’s name was Ullr and was often depicted wearing skis and holding a bow and arrow.

giphy (4)

  • The medical name for a hangover, veisalgia, is an amalgam of the Greek  ‘algia’ referring to pain and the Old Norse ‘kveis’, meaning the ‘unease one feels after a period of debauchery’.
  • The Vikings had issues with the English sh-sound. Places like Shipton became Skipton. Most sk words in english are Viking in origin. We still have issues with the sh-sound today – many Swedes often mix up ch and sh sounds when speaking English (Shicken instead of chicken, shallenge, shild for child etc).
  • Vikings used an outdoor ‘loo’ and wiped their bums with moss and sheep’s wool [How do we know these things? Really? – ed]
  • William the Conqueror was the grandson of Viking king Rollo – the Norsemen were just a few generations from the Normans.

Thank you also to Dr. Tina Paphitis PhD, our resident archaeologist who is leaving us this week to return to University of London. If you happen to have any fun projects for Tina that will mean her digging sites involving Viking stuff and folklore in any place on the planet, do contact us and we’ll let her know.
——–
Disclaimer: While we will always try to be as correct as possible, no responsibility for facts in this article can be taken. We’re a cafe with a nice blog, not fact keepers of all things Vikings. So double check before you use any of these in any official capacity what-so-ever. Just to be sure.
——–

Fancy some Viking food maybe?

Get 10% off your first order – just enter ‘scandilife10’ at checkout.  

How to be Swedish

March 30, 2016 | 1 Comment

How to be Swedish, even if you’re not in Sweden – A quick guide.

      So, you want to be Swedish? You don’t need to go to Sweden to be Swedish – just follow this quick do-it-at-home guide and you’ll be saying jo-jo at the beginning of every sentence before you know it.

1. Drink a lot of coffee.

Even if you think you drink a lot of coffee, double it right now and still not out-do the average Swede. We drink more coffee than anyone in the world, (except the Finns). Go for strong filter coffee.

coffee

2. When you get up in the morning, follow this ritual:

2 slices of crisp bread, 1-2 boiled eggs, a squirt of Kalles creamed cod roe with your eggs. Some sliced cheese, if you are feeling fancy. Drink a large glass of milk. Coffee.

osten 2

3. How to slice the above cheese

Using the designated correct slicer for the job, you always follow the slicing rules: DO NOT MAKE A SLOPE. This is a cardinal sin. Simply slice a bit from each side every time and the cheese will stay level. If it’s not level, you lose 3 Swedify points.

thebest

4. Every time someone says anything about anything, just say: in Sweden, we have that. Except ours is better.

As in:

Your friend: Oh, taste these lovely British crisps I just bought.
You: We have these in Sweden, too, except ours are dill flavoured. And better.

5. Fika a lot.

At least twice a day, stop what you are doing and go get another coffee. Sit down. Eat a cinnamon bun. Talk to others who are doing the same. This is now something you do twice a day for the rest of your life. It’s called Fika. It’s a noun and a verb, so you can meet for a fika or you can fika with someone. Never ever use another word for it, such as “coffee break”, because it just won’t do. Always say fika. See point 4.

thor

6. Cinnamon buns

Because you are now eating two a day, learn to make them properly, because Swedes bake at home. If you ever add any kind of icing on top of cinnamon buns, go back to Swedish School: you just lost the game.

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7. Swedify your apartment or personal space.

Paint everything white (walls, doors, floors… everything). This is your canvas on which to express yourself. Add a few block colours, maybe some Poäng chairs or tastefully selected ikea key pieces with names such as DalaBördiholm or something (laugh that all things you step on in Ikea have Danish names). Add some cushions with tasteful Swedish patterns. Add candles everywhere, ready to go as soon as darkness falls.

Stockholm-apartment-7

8. Make your Swedish dinner

Meatballs with mash and gravy is too stereotypical. Instead, the real Swedish the national dish: Kottbullar & Snabb Makroner. SnabbMakroner is basically quick-cook pasta. Because real Swedes refuse to wait 8 minutes for pasta to cook, so they invented one that cooks in 3 (See point no 4). Add Köttbullar meatballs, squirt Felix Ketchup all over the plate and award yourself another 5 Swedify points.

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9. Eat in the dark

As a Swede, you will know that eating in the dark is quite normal. So, as soon as darkness falls, light 20-30 candles and turn off all electric light (keep heating at 24 degrees, which is natural indoor Swedish temperature). This is to be referred to as ‘mysigt’, or ‘really cosy’. At any time where darkness falls, do this, especially when eating, even if you can’t see your quick cook pasta with ketchup.

darkdining

10. Schedule your washing time.

It’s a Swedish thing, tvättstugatid, or ‘booked washing machine time’ – because if you live in an apartment in Sweden, you have shared laundry rooms. Feel more Swedish by doing this at home – just write a note and stick it to your washing machine. Put all your clothes in a blue ikea bag, go to the machine at your allotted time and loudly sigh when you find your flatmate has rudely taken the machine when you’ve so Swedishly pre-booked it. 3 points.

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11. Announce when you need to pee.

It really is a thing. At a board meeting in the city? Stand up and confidently announce: “Jag musta kissa” (I need to wee), leave the room and do not look the least bit embarrassed. You’ve just earned 5 Swedify points, my friend.

Peeing-gif 2

12. It’s Friday night. Your friends are going out.

You plan to stay in and do Cosy Friday, Fredagsmys . This involves opening a large bag of dill crisps, adding these to a large bowl. Make some ‘dip mix’ (mix spices with exotic names such as holiday mix with crème fraiche; stir) and dip every crisp before eating. Don’t forget to do all this in the darkness.

For extra Swede points, start every Friday evening by eating homemade tacos. Only ever do this on Fridays, tacos are only for Fridays.

fredagsmys

13. It’s Saturday. You go to the shop and buy a bag of pick’n’mix.

Because from now on, you only eat sweets on Saturdays and you refer to it as Lördagsgodis: Saturday sweets (by definition, you then can’t eat it on other days). Stay in and watch things like På Spåret, which is the best thing on Swedish TV, except for Melodifestivalen (Swedish Eurovision). Don’t forget to tell everybody you hate Eurovision, but watch it anyway.

elisabetojesper-jpg

14. Sports

Anytime anyone says anything about football, realise you can’t really compete, but just add at the end of every sentence:
“We have this guy called Zlatan. We don’t need a full team to win anymore”.

At any other given opportunity, explain the off side rule for handball or ice hockey into conversation to give yourself the edge on Swedish Popular Sports.

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15. Keep fit like a Swede.

When you realise that 2 buns a day isn’t going to be guilt free, take up any or all of the following:
Skiing, cross country skiing, walking, hill walking, stick walking, Nordic walking, stock Nordic walking, dog walking, walking Nordic dogs… Or anything that requires you to go outside and get rosy cheeks on two legs. During these outdoor pursuits, do not engage in conversation with strangers, other than a quick ‘dag’ grunt. Always make sure you wear a mössa, a woolly hat.

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16. Queuing

If you need to queue, do it like a Swede. At bus stops, ensure at least 2 safety metres between you and the closest stranger to you. Do not make conversation, not even about the weather. Ask your local shop to re-install the ticket queuing machines that went out of fashion here in 1987 – because Swedes need these so they don’t have to stand in line (see issue with bus stop queuing and safety metres). See point 4, if in doubt of this particular practise.

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Congratulations, you are now a bit more Swedish.

Fancy some Swedish food to complete your Swedification?

Get 10% off your first order – just enter ‘scandilife10’ at checkout.  

 

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