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Tag Archives: svensk

Swedish Princess Cake: 7 Random Facts

August 24, 2018 | Leave a comment

7 Random Facts About Swedish Princess Cake

1. 70% of all cakes sold from Swedish pastry shops are princess cakes in some shape or forms. About half a million are sold each year. 

2. Since 2004 the last week of September has been dedicated to the cake – yep – a whole week where you can indulge (although maybe best not to, not every day!)

3. Marlene Dietrich once warned against men who don’t enjoy cake (and food in general) – she deemed them ‘lousy lovers’.

4. The cake came about in the 1930s when the home economics teacher of the three Swedish princesses published her cookbook, named ‘the Princesses’ Cookbook’. The book contained a recipe for a green cake that was their favourite and it quickly became known as the princess cake instead. 

5. Sometimes you’ll see the princess cake in different colours. Traditionalists insists that the real deal has to be green – other’s say it doesn’t matter. Some places it will be called Opera torte if it is pink, Carl Gustaf torte if it is yellow, and any other colour simply called Prince torte. We don’t mind – they’re all delicious.

6. To jam – or not to jam? We like raspberry jam in ours – but this is a fairly new addition, it seems. We also like adding fresh raspberries in season. Traditional or not – it goes so, so well with the luscious vanilla cream and sweet marzipan.

7. In 2016, someone thought it would be interesting to see what happened if you cross a princess cake with the Swedish semla – the marzipan cream bun they eat for pancake day. We tried it – it was delicious. Like a mini cake, but all to yourself. 

Recommended products

    Dr Oetker Kagecreme Vanilje – Instant Vanilla Creme 3x85g
    £3.09
    Odense Marsipanlock – Marzipan Cake Cover 200g
    £5.59
    Karen Volf Lagkagebunde – Cake Sponges 3-pack
    £2.99

13 Useful Scandinavian Insults

April 27, 2018 | Leave a comment

13 brilliant Scandinavian insults

Feeling a bit annoyed, need to let some steam off? How about you do so with these rather wonderful Scandinavian insults – many of which are under used thanks to the influx of English – but they sound oh so lovely. These are just a handful from a loooong list, we had to stop somewhere. Give it a go and tell us if there are any of these you use, or any we have missed – like the wonderful ‘Suppegjøk’ (Norwegian) . Lit. Soup cuckoo – Someone ditsy and silly. ‘You’ve lost your wallet AGAIN? You soup cuckoo!’

    1. Klossmajor (Danish, Norwegian) – Lit. Brick major – Someone super clumsy.
      klossmajor
    2. Juksemaker pipelort (Norwegian) – Lit. Cheat maker pipe poo – Someone who cheats. The second half usually only added on by children.
    3. Snuskhummer (Swedish) – Lit. dirty lobster – used about dirty (old?) men staring at girls.
      snuskhummer
    4. Snoronga (Swedish, has Danish and Norwegian equivalents) – Lit. Snot child – someone snotty and spoilt; a brat.
      Snoronga
    5. Klaptorsk (Danish) – Lit. Clapping cod – Someone doing something very stupid; much like a cod attempting to clap .
      Klaptorsk
    6. Vatnisse (Danish, Norwegian) – Lit. cotton gnome – someone silly (with cottonwool for brains, perhaps). EDIT: also used about person that never stands up for anything or anyone, but always gives in (thank you Fredd!)
    7. Narhat (Danish) – Lit. Fool’s hat – someone so stupid they’re not even worthy being called a fool, just the fool’s hat.
      Narhat
    8. Skitstövel (Swedish) – Lit. Shit boot – someone full of shit.
      Skitstovel
    9. Kronidiot (Norwegian) – Lit. Crown idiot – As stupid as you can get. The leader of the idiots.
      kronidiot
    10. Korkad (Swedish) – Lit. Corked – Someone stupid.
      korkad
    11. Bytting (Norwegian) – Lit. Swapee (ie. Being swapped) – someone so stupid or evil you think they have been swapped for someone from the underworld.
      bytting
    12. Dumbom (Swedish) – Lit. Stupid barrier – Barriers are, in general, stupid because they are blocking the way, right? So a stupid-barrier is an insult you do not want thrown after you.
      dumbom barrier
    13. Mehe (Norwegian) – Lit. from Medhenger, meaning ‘with-hanger’ – someone who just follows and can’t think for themselves.Followers Mehe

 

 

Zesty Prawn Crispbread Pizza

September 14, 2017 | Leave a comment

Prawn Pizza With Zesty Gremolata

A fresh and zingy pizza with plenty of flavour from fresh herbs, lemon zest, a mix of cheeses and fresh prawns.

  • 8 pieces Leksands triangle crispbread (or 1 round)
  • 100ml tomato sauce
  • 1 small onion + butter/oil for frying
  • 50ml ricotta
  • handful finely chopped basil
  • 60g mozzarella
  • Big handful grated cheese (e.g. Vasterbotten)
  • 2 handfuls finely chopped parsley, zest from 1 small lemon, 1 garlic clove grated – mixed to a Gremolata
  • Big handful peeled prawns
  • Seasalt and black pepper

1. Pre-heat oven to 225 degrees celsius.
2. Finely chop onion and fry in a bit of butter until soft – add sugar and let caramelise. Season with salt & pepper.
3. Spread the tomato sauce over the base. Add the onion, basil and ricotta – finish with the mozzarella and grated cheese.

Bake for 10 mins or until the cheese is bubbly and slightly golden. Top with prawns and gremolata – serve immediately.

Enjoy!

—–

Zesty Prawn Pizza

Thanks to our friends at Leksands for the recipe – just mildly adapted for a UK kitchen.

Salmon & Dill Pizza

September 7, 2017 | Leave a comment

Crispbread Pizza With Salmon & Dill

Hej hej, another quick and easy crispbread pizza recipe. This time flavoured with two Scandi staples – salmon and dill. Dillicious. By using a round of Leksands as your base you can have pizza in 12 minutes – and the mild rye flavour works really well with the salmon. An added bonus is, of course, that it is actually good for you! Win win win. Win.

You will need:

  • 1 round of Leksands crispbread OR 8 pieces Leksands triangle crispbread
  • 100ml tomato sauce
  • 1 small onion, chopped – plus butter or oil for frying
  • 75g hot smoked salmon
  • 60g mozzarella
  • Zest from 1/2 lemon
  • 1 tbsp browned butter
  • fresh dill
  • Freshly grated horseradish (from a jar will work in a pinch)
  • Good handful grated cheddar (or try it with Vasterbotten)
  • Sea salt & freshly ground pepper

1. Pre-heat oven to 225 degrees celsius.
2. Finely chop onion and fry in a bit of butter until soft – add a pinch of sugar and the garlic and let caramelise. Season with salt & pepper.
3. Spread the tomato sauce over the base. Add the onion and the salmon in smaller chunks – finish with the mozzarella and grated cheese. Season with pepper.

Bake for approximately 10 minutes until the cheese is bubbly and slightly golden. Top with lemon zest, grated horseradish and a drizzle of browned butter, if liked.

Enjoy!

—–

Salmon & Dill Pizza

Thanks to our friends at Leksands for the recipe – just mildly adapted for a UK kitchen.

Swedish Midsummer – How To Celebrate – Therese’s Way

June 9, 2016 | Leave a comment

Swedish Midsummer – How I Celebrate

Swedes all over Love midsummer (you might have seen Alicia Vikander on Jimmy Fallon..? If not, we’ve included the clip for you below). There are many ways to celebrate, and this week, our Thérèse shares her way of celebrating. Over to you, T!

” Hej! I am Thérèse and I’m located in Stockhome. I recently moved to London from Sweden. It doesn’t matter where I am this time of year – I always celebrate midsummer.

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Photo credit: Conny Fridh/imagebank.sweden.se

Midsummer for me is all about having fun, celebrating with friends and eat a lot of food. I often celebrate the holiday on the actual midsummer eve (this year – 24th June) ‘midsommarafton’ – but it really depends on when my friends are free to celebrate.

Growing up I spent most of my summers in the summerhouse in the west of Sweden, and we would usually go to the closest local midsummer event to celebrate there. These days the place of the celebration varies – either in a park or at someone’s house – usually the friend with the best garden. One thing remains the same wherever though – flower garlands in my hair. It’s essential.

Making_midsummer_flower_garlands-06

 

What do we eat at midsummer?

Food is of course very important during midsummer. My friends and I often prepare a buffet together. We cook most of the food ourselves but we usually buy some things, like nibbles, ready made. That way we can nibble whilst we cook and take our time with it. We usually get snacks like sour cream and onion crisps, dill crisps, cheese corn snacks and some beer to drink.

The buffet has certain ‘rules’ to it – the first round is all about herring and bread. Having a good range of herring is essential. My favourites have always been the mustard herring, onion herring and the herring in roe, but a good midsummer spread usually includes even more – such as dill herring or herring in curry (You can browse our range of herring here).

We also have a variety of crispbread, rye bread and polar bread – as well as new potatoes boiled in a lot of dill. We eat the potatoes sliced up on your bread of choice with a bit of herring. With this we also serve cured or smoked salmon; seafood salad is also always included in our buffet. I like to top my salmon sandwiches with dill and mustard sauce.

In addition to the herring and fish, we often have a barbecue with different meats, spicy sausages and new-potato salad and chips with Vasterbotten cheese – lovely with a fresh dip! To drink we have lagers (beer) and aquavit. Of course, in true Swedish fashion, we have to sing some drinking songs.

Finally we’ll have a lovely strawberry cake (we have a nice recipe – click through to view) and perhaps some of our favourite sweets and chocolates. If we feel really merry we might search for a midsummer pole to do some embarrassing little frog dancing around.”

Don’t know what Frog Dancing  is? Have a look below, where the Oscar winning Swedish actress Alicia Vikander shows Jimmy Fallon how it’s done. Happy Midsummer all!

 

To read more about Swedish midsummer – click here.

To visit our Midsummer Shop for all the foods and snacks you need, click here.

 

Recipe: Korv Stroganoff

February 5, 2015 | Leave a comment

Korv Stroganoff. Ask any Swede and they’ll tell you all about this quick mid-week favourite meal. It’s delicious, even if it isn’t the most photogenic of dishes.

Made with Falukorv, a cooked pork sausage, this dish takes only ten minutes to put together. Falukorv can be bought in our cafe shop or also on Ocado. We highly recommend the brand Per I Viken for the high meat content and great smoked flavour.
www.scandikitchen.co.uk for more.

Serve with rice.

Recipe: Korv Stroganoff
Recipe Type: Dinner
Cuisine: Swedish
Author: Bronte Aurell
Prep time:
Cook time:
Total time:
Serves: 3-4
A quick and easy sausage casserole. A hearty Swedish mid week meal.
Ingredients
  • 1 x 400g falukorv sausage, skin removed and chopped in large chunks.
  • 1 small onion, chopped
  • 1 tbsp tomato purée
  • 1 tin chopped tomatoes
  • 1/2 stock cube diluted in a bit of hot water
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 250ml milk
  • Dollop of double cream (optional)
  • Corn Flour, to thicken
Instructions
  1. In a saucepan, add a bit of oil and cook the onion until soft. Add the sausage and stir. Add tomato purée, chopped tomatoes and stock. Continue cooking for a few minutes, then add the milk and bay leaf. Season with salt and pepper and a bit of sugar, if needed.
  2. Thin a tbsp cornflour with some water and add to the pot to thicken. Add cream at the end, if using.

(subtitute Falukorv for Frankfurters if you can’t get hold of the real Swedish deal).

15 ways you know you’re a real Swedish ex-pat

October 22, 2014 | 1 Comment

1.    All other Swedes are your best friends when you meet them out on the town. Even that weird guy with the Viking tattoo who sings ‘Du Gamla Du Fria’ really slowly, with his eyes closed.

ikealineDSC_0283

2.    You go on and on and on about how A-MA-ZING Sweden is but don’t really know how to reply when people ask you why you left.

3.      You take three inter-connecting city buses AND a train on a Saturday afternoon just to get to Ikea so you can eat meatballs and sit in a sofa named after your home town.

4.  Fridays at 4 pm you start humming ‘Fredagsmys’ in the office and start thinking of dill chips.

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5.     You shake your head at everybody else’s snow problems. It’s just not like home. They just don’t understand ‘real’ snow.

Image: SWEDEN-WEATHER-FEATURE

6.   You argue with your partner whether to watch Kalle Anka on Christmas eve Swedish time or local time (even though it’s on DVD and you’ve seen it every Christmas since 1982)

kalleanka

7.   You correct other people’s pronunciation of IKEA. It’s just not right. Eee-kay-ah. Yes, really.

8.   You get real tears in your eyes when you see the first Julmust of the year.

julmust

[button type=”default” size=”large” link=”http://www.scandikitchen.co.uk/shop/”]Shop around for more Scandi food[/button]

9.   You finally accept that Korv Stroganof is not the original version of Stroganof.

10.   You have a Spotify playlist entitled ‘Heja Sverige’.

11.  You suddenly realise you no longer know the name of your Prime Minister as you’ve been out of Sweden longer than you ever lived there.

12.   You happily label any non-Swede a coward for not eating fermented herring – despite there being no chance in hell you’ll ever eat it yourself.

13.   You are no longer surprised when Non-Swedes tell you they don’t actually use a cheese slicer.

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14.    Severe liquorice withdrawal symptoms, resulting in hour long trips across cities just to get hold of some ‘really good stuff

lakridt

15.   And when you go back home to Sweden, things seem sort of just… different.

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Recipe: “Jordgubbstårta” Strawberry Celebration Cake

June 19, 2014 | Leave a comment

Strawberry Celebration Cake

Ahhhh.... This is such a nice cake. It tastes of summer. Pure summer. We re-tested the recipe last night and the result lasted only for as long as it took us to eat it. With second helpings. For us, no Midsummer is complete without strawberrry layercakes, also known as "Jordgubbsstårta". If you want to cheat and make it easy for yourself, cheat's notes are at the bottom of the post. We do feel that it is worth the effort, though, to make everything from scratch.

Ingredients

For the Vanilla Patisserie Cream

  • NOTE: Needs to be cooled before using in the cake or the cream will split.
  • 1 vanilla pod
  • 500 ml whole milk
  • 6 egg yolks
  • 140 g caster sugar
  • 45 g corn flour

For the Strawberry layers

  • 700 g strawberries washed, trimmed and sliced
  • 75 g raspberry jam

For the Cake Layers

  • 5 eggs
  • 150 g caster sugar
  • 130 g plain flour
  • 1 tsp. vanilla sugar

For the Whipped Cream

  • 700 ml whipping cream
  • 2 tbs icing sugar
  • 1 tsp vanilla sugar

Instructions

Vanilla Patisserie Cream:

  1. Split the vanilla pod and scrape out the seeds and add to a saucepan with the milk. Bring to the boil. Take care not to burn and turn off heat as soon as boiling point is reached.

  2. Whisk egg yolk and sugar until it goes almost white, then turn off the whisk and add the corn flour. Turn the whisk back on medium and slowly add the hot milk to the bowl, whisking continuously.
  3. Pour the mixture back into the saucepan and bring back to the boil and cook for 1 minute to thicken. Turn off, sieve the mixture into a bowl, cling film directly on to the cream to avoid a skin forming and cool down completely in the fridge before using.

Cake Layers:

  1. Heat the oven to 200 degrees Celsius.

  2. Trace 3 identical circles onto baking paper – approximately 20-22 cm diameter. Place baking paper onto flat baking trays.
  3. Whisk egg and sugar until white and fluffy. The key here, is to whisk for a long time to incorporate as much air as possible as there are not raising agents in the mixture.
  4. Sift flour and vanilla sugar into the egg mixture and fold, very carefully, until completely incorporated. Preserve as much air as possible, so fold carefully but thoroughly.
  5. Carefully divide the batter between the three circles and ensure batter fills the circles all the way around, neatly.
  6. Bake in the oven until just golden brown and done – this will depend on your oven, but 5-6 minutes is usually fine.
  7. Remove from and leave to cool completely on a cooling rack. Very carefully remove the baking paper – if it sticks, wet the back of the paper a little bit and it should come off with more ease.

Whipped Cream

  1. On high speed, whisk all ingredients until stiff peaks form. The cream needs to be quite firm to hold when decorating the cake - but take care not to over whip.
  2. Divide the cream into two equal portions. Fold one half of the whipped cream together with the cold vanilla patisserie cream until completely incorporated (The other half is used to decorate the final cake).

Assembly

  1. Place the first layer cake on the plate you wish to serve on. Spread a nice layer of raspberry jam, follow by a 1cm thick layer of the patisserie cream / whipped cream mixture. Add a good handful of sliced strawberries evenly spread out. Add another cake layer and repeat over again and then add the final cake layer on top (You may have a bit of excess custard cream left).
  2. Using a palette knife, spread a thin layer of the whipped cream on the top of the cake. Using a piping bag with a star nozzle, add the rest of the whipped cream and pipe carefully around the edge of the cake in an up-and-down motion until the sides are completely covered. If you do not have a piping bag, you can use the palette knife for this and just make smooth edges. If you prefer less cream and a more rustic look you can omit the cream around the edges all together.
  3. Finish by adding the remaining strawberries on the top of the cake. It doesn’t have to look too arranged – just scatter them so the cake is evenly covered.
  4. This cake greatly improves after a few hours in the fridge so all the flavours are soaked into the cake layers.

Recipe Notes

Cake layers – in speciality shop, you can buy sponge layers already baked. (Scandi Kitchen sells ‘Lagkage bunde’ – already come split into three layers).

Crème patisserie: We stock a product called 'Kagecreme’ which is sachet of instant creme patisserie. Mix one sachet with 500ml cold milk, wait ten minutes and it is ready to use.

Substituting with custard will not give you the exact same result, but you CAN do it at a push – but don’t use half and half, use ¼ custard to ¾ whipped cream volume. Omit the sugar in the whipped cream as custard is really sweet.

Recommended Products

    Dr Oetker Kagecreme Vanilje – Instant Vanilla Creme 3x85g
    £3.09
    Torsleff Vaniljesukker – Vanilla Sugar 100g
    £3.19
    Den Gamle Fabrik Hindbær Marmelade – Raspberry Jam
    £3.59
    Kungsornen Vetemjol Finaste Kärn – Wheat Flour 2kg
    £2.59
    Karen Volf Lagkagebunde – Cake Sponges 3-pack
    £2.99

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