Tag Archives: svensk

Swedish Midsummer – How To Celebrate – Therese’s Way

June 9, 2016 | Leave a comment

Swedish Midsummer – How I Celebrate

Swedes all over Love midsummer (you might have seen Alicia Vikander on Jimmy Fallon..? If not, we’ve included the clip for you below). There are many ways to celebrate, and this week, our Thérèse shares her way of celebrating. Over to you, T!

” Hej! I am Thérèse and I’m located in Stockhome. I recently moved to London from Sweden. It doesn’t matter where I am this time of year – I always celebrate midsummer.


Photo credit: Conny Fridh/imagebank.sweden.se

Midsummer for me is all about having fun, celebrating with friends and eat a lot of food. I often celebrate the holiday on the actual midsummer eve (this year – 24th June) ‘midsommarafton’ – but it really depends on when my friends are free to celebrate.

Growing up I spent most of my summers in the summerhouse in the west of Sweden, and we would usually go to the closest local midsummer event to celebrate there. These days the place of the celebration varies – either in a park or at someone’s house – usually the friend with the best garden. One thing remains the same wherever though – flower garlands in my hair. It’s essential.



What do we eat at midsummer?

Food is of course very important during midsummer. My friends and I often prepare a buffet together. We cook most of the food ourselves but we usually buy some things, like nibbles, ready made. That way we can nibble whilst we cook and take our time with it. We usually get snacks like sour cream and onion crisps, dill crisps, cheese corn snacks and some beer to drink.

The buffet has certain ‘rules’ to it – the first round is all about herring and bread. Having a good range of herring is essential. My favourites have always been the mustard herring, onion herring and the herring in roe, but a good midsummer spread usually includes even more – such as dill herring or herring in curry (You can browse our range of herring here).

We also have a variety of crispbread, rye bread and polar bread – as well as new potatoes boiled in a lot of dill. We eat the potatoes sliced up on your bread of choice with a bit of herring. With this we also serve cured or smoked salmon; seafood salad is also always included in our buffet. I like to top my salmon sandwiches with dill and mustard sauce.

In addition to the herring and fish, we often have a barbecue with different meats, spicy sausages and new-potato salad and chips with Vasterbotten cheese – lovely with a fresh dip! To drink we have lagers (beer) and aquavit. Of course, in true Swedish fashion, we have to sing some drinking songs.

Finally we’ll have a lovely strawberry cake (we have a nice recipe – click through to view) and perhaps some of our favourite sweets and chocolates. If we feel really merry we might search for a midsummer pole to do some embarrassing little frog dancing around.”

Don’t know what Frog Dancing  is? Have a look below, where the Oscar winning Swedish actress Alicia Vikander shows Jimmy Fallon how it’s done. Happy Midsummer all!


To read more about Swedish midsummer – click here.

To visit our Midsummer Shop for all the foods and snacks you need, click here.


Recipe: Korv Stroganoff

February 5, 2015 | Leave a comment

Korv Stroganoff. Ask any Swede and they’ll tell you all about this quick mid-week favourite meal. It’s delicious, even if it isn’t the most photogenic of dishes.

Made with Falukorv, a cooked pork sausage, this dish takes only ten minutes to put together. Falukorv can be bought in our cafe shop or also on Ocado. We highly recommend the brand Per I Viken for the high meat content and great smoked flavour.
www.scandikitchen.co.uk for more.

Serve with rice.

Recipe: Korv Stroganoff
Prep time
Cook time
Total time
A quick and easy sausage casserole. A hearty Swedish mid week meal.
Recipe type: Dinner
Cuisine: Swedish
Serves: 3-4
  • 1 x 400g falukorv sausage, skin removed and chopped in large chunks.
  • 1 small onion, chopped
  • 1 tbsp tomato purée
  • 1 tin chopped tomatoes
  • ½ stock cube diluted in a bit of hot water
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 250ml milk
  • Dollop of double cream (optional)
  • Corn Flour, to thicken
  1. In a saucepan, add a bit of oil and cook the onion until soft. Add the sausage and stir. Add tomato purée, chopped tomatoes and stock. Continue cooking for a few minutes, then add the milk and bay leaf. Season with salt and pepper and a bit of sugar, if needed.
  2. Thin a tbsp cornflour with some water and add to the pot to thicken. Add cream at the end, if using.

(subtitute Falukorv for Frankfurters if you can’t get hold of the real Swedish deal).

15 ways you know you’re a real Swedish ex-pat

October 22, 2014 | 1 Comment

1.    All other Swedes are your best friends when you meet them out on the town. Even that weird guy with the Viking tattoo who sings ‘Du Gamla Du Fria’ really slowly, with his eyes closed.


2.    You go on and on and on about how A-MA-ZING Sweden is but don’t really know how to reply when people ask you why you left.

3.      You take three inter-connecting city buses AND a train on a Saturday afternoon just to get to Ikea so you can eat meatballs and sit in a sofa named after your home town.

4.  Fridays at 4 pm you start humming ‘Fredagsmys’ in the office and start thinking of dill chips.


5.     You shake your head at everybody else’s snow problems. It’s just not like home. They just don’t understand ‘real’ snow.


6.   You argue with your partner whether to watch Kalle Anka on Christmas eve Swedish time or local time (even though it’s on DVD and you’ve seen it every Christmas since 1982)


7.   You correct other people’s pronunciation of IKEA. It’s just not right. Eee-kay-ah. Yes, really.

8.   You get real tears in your eyes when you see the first Julmust of the year.


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9.   You finally accept that Korv Stroganof is not the original version of Stroganof.

10.   You have a Spotify playlist entitled ‘Heja Sverige’.

11.  You suddenly realise you no longer know the name of your Prime Minister as you’ve been out of Sweden longer than you ever lived there.

12.   You happily label any non-Swede a coward for not eating fermented herring – despite there being no chance in hell you’ll ever eat it yourself.

13.   You are no longer surprised when Non-Swedes tell you they don’t actually use a cheese slicer.


14.    Severe liquorice withdrawal symptoms, resulting in hour long trips across cities just to get hold of some ‘really good stuff


15.   And when you go back home to Sweden, things seem sort of just… different.


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