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How to hotdog the Scandi way

July 1, 2018 | Leave a comment

 

How to hotdog the Scandinavian way

Look, we have told the world that we’re all about nature. That we forage for weird plants, eat sour milk and lead wholesome, healthy lagom lives. This is, of course, sort of true.

There is another little thing that we Scandinavians ‘do’, though. A lot. We hotdog. Okay, it’s not a verb, but it should be – and we want to hotdog with you, too.

What’s so good about a Scandi Hotdog?

The Sausage

Obviously, the most important part. There are many varieties, but the best ones are rather high meat content (go figure) – brands such as small food producer Per I Viken do the best ones on the market. The style of sausage in Scandinavian is always a wiener type sausage.

In Denmark, they like RED coloured sausages. Why? It started as a bit of a ploy. In the olden days, the hotdog vendors were allowed to sell yesterday’s sausages for pittance to the kids – BUT they had to add red colouring to the water so people know they were getting day-old sausages. Nowadays, this type is the most famous of them all – and no, they are no longer old, but are just made like this for nostalgia reasons.

These are most popular with the Danes… The red thing, it’s a Danish thing.

The Bread

It’s a funny one, but we don’t like long buns. Our buns are short and way too small for the sausage. Yeah, we know – but that’s how we like them. We don’t do long buns. We do good, shorter buns – less bread.

Toppings

We take our topping serious. Go to the bottom of this post for the country specific ‘ways’ – but here is a low-down:

Ketchup

It’s never Heinz. It’s usually a more spiced variety that is made for our hotdogs. Try Idun for a Norway style – or Bähncke for a superb Danish ketchup.

Mustard

Again, Bähncke is a good one – or Idun from Norway, especially for hotdogs. We also have Swedish Slotts mustard, but it is quite strong, so only for the initiated.

Remoulade

Absolutely essential, if you are a Dane. It’s very nice, too. (also goes with chips, fish, beef and anything else, really)

Crispy onions

Delicious on burgers, hotdogs, sandwiches.

Raw onions

The Danes favour this: We like raw.

Pickles

Several options here. Boston Pickles is chopped pickles from Sweden, with a bit of seasoning. Or go for the ever popular Smörgåsgurka from Sweden – a crunchy pickle, quite sweet. Lastly, the Danish Agurkesalat – thinly sliced pickles – perfect on top of those red sausages.

Gurkmajonäs

Chopped pickles (usually smörgåsgurka) mixed with mayonnaise – favoured by Swedes.

The HotDogs

Denmark

A bun, a red sausage, ketchup, mustard, remoulade, raw OR crispy onions. Or both. Pickled Agurkesalat.

Norway

A potato pancake called a lompe, brown pølse sausage, ketchup, mustard.

Sweden

A bun, a brown wienerkorv, ketchup, mustard, Bostongurka or Gurkmajonäs.

Sweden 2: The above, but with a dollop of mashed potato on top. Known as Halv Special (A Half Special). Add another Sausage as it is Hel Special (Full Special)

Sweden 3: Bun, sausage, prawn mayonnaise. Well, yes, it’s a thing. Some add ketchup, too. And yes, some add mash as well. It’s a Swedish thing, we’ve given up questioning this.

Recipe: Romkugler (rum flavour chocolate treats)

October 14, 2014 | Leave a comment

 

Back in the day, the Danish bakers needed to find a use for all the left over Danish pastry, seeing as they could never sell it on the second day. And thus, Romkugler (literally: Rum balls) were born.

Danes will often tell you this is one of those treats they miss most from home (in Sweden they are known as Arrakballs). We all used to pop by the bakers on the way home from school and get a few of these cheap but delicious treats. Its a taste of our childhood.

So, to make these, you need some leftover bits of cake and pastry.  When we made some today, we used 2 cinnamon Danish whirls, 2 raspberry crowns and 1 cinnamon bun. But you can use different things (although we have found that French croissants and pain au chocolate don’t work as well).

Blitz the day old pastries in a food processor, then add 2 tablespoons of raspberry jam, 2 heaped  tablespoons cocoa powder and then 2 tablespoons of rum essence (you can also use real rum, but because these are not cooked, the flavour will be strong and the alcohol will not evaporate).

Blend everything together until you have a smooth mass, then shape into golf ball sized pieces.  Roll in chocolate sprinkles or desiccated coconut.  Chill for a bit – and serve.

We recommend eating the day you make these, but they are probably good the day after, too. Its unlikely to be an issue, though… They usually don’t last the day as they are very moorish.

 

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