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Easy Västerbotten Cheese Quiche

June 7, 2018 | Leave a comment

Easy Västerbotten Cheese Quiche

A great side dish for a crayfish party – this traditional cheese tart is really lovely served with caviar dressing.

For the pastry:
125g cold butter
200g plain flour
pinch of salt
1 egg (plus water, if needed – add a few drops if dough is not coming together)

For the filling:
250g Västerbotten cheese, grated
3 eggs
100ml whole milk
250ml double cream
½ tsp paprika, salt and pepper

You’ll need a tart tin (25-28cm diameter) with a loose base.

Method:

  1. Blitz your pastry ingredients in a food processor (egg and water at the end only) to form a dough, then leave to chill for about 30 minutes in the fridge.
  2. Heat the oven to 180°C.
  3. Roll out the chilled dough and line the pastry tin. Prick the base with a fork and blind bake using baking beans for 10-12 minutes. Remove the beans and bake for a further 5-6 minutes.
  4. For the filling, mix together everything except the Västerbotten cheese.
  5. Scatter the cheese on the base of the pastry, evenly all over – then pour over the egg mixture.
  6. Return it to the oven for about 15-20 minutes. It’ll puff up quite a bit towards the end, but will turn golden on top. It’s done when it is ‘set’ so do keep an eye on it.

Leave it to cool before slicing. Serve cold or lukewarm.

Västerbottenpaj goes well with romsås, a caviar sauce. Alternatively, if you can get real bleak roe (Löjrom), serve the tart with a spoonful of this, some crème fraîche and finely chopped red onion.

Romsås Caivar Sauce:

In a bowl, mix together 3 large tbsp. crème fraiche and one jar of red lumpfish roe (80g). Leave to set in the fridge, then stir again just before serving.

    Norrmejerier Västerbottensost – Mature Cheese 33% 450g – Shortdated
    £9.99 £6.99
    - +
    Norrmejerier Vasterbottensost Rökt – Smoked Mature Cheese 165g – Best Before 17/7
    £4.29 £1.99
    Norrmejerier Vasterbottensost – Gourmet Piece 165g
    £4.99
    - +

Mother’s Day Recipes to Treat Your Mamma

May 27, 2018 | Leave a comment

 

Mother’s Day – For all those lovely Scandi Mammas

Mother’s Day was celebrated the first time in 1908 following an initiative from Anna Marie Jarvis who wanted to honour her mother for her work during the American civil war. The celebration became official in 1913, and set to fall on the second Sunday in May which is the day most countries observe it. In the UK it is celebrated the fourth Sunday of lent, as it originated as a day for Christians to visit their ‘mother’ church.

Regardless of when it is celebrated, a special day to treat your Mamma should be acknowledged – a sweet card, maybe some flowers or a treat are all safe ways to make her feel special. And as we think nothing quite says ‘Mamma, you’re the best’ like baked goods – here are some of our favourite recipes for a Sunday dedicated to mamma.

  1. Classic cinnamon buns. You can’t go wrong with these – like a hug in bun-form.
  2. Sally’s chocolate buns. In case you live with someone who are more chocolatey than cinnamon-y. Think cinnamon bun but with chocolate in place of the cinnamon filling.
  3. Chokladbollar – Chocolate Oat Treats – For when you don’t have time to bake, these no-bake classics are perfect. Chocolatey with hints of coffee and oats – a lovely little treat.
  4. Lingonberry and spice layer cake (recipe in ScandiKitchen: Fika & Hygge). Looks gratifyingly impressive for the comparatively easy process – sure to score you tons of offspring-points.
  5. Seeded rye rolls (recipe in the ScandiKitchen cookbook) Perhaps not your typical treat – but just imagine how nice it is to wake to a house smelling of freshly made bread, the breakfast table set and the coffee brewing. Nothing to do for mamma but sit down. A loving gesture if ever we saw one. Just make sure you also take care of the tidying up – unfortunately any goodwill built up from enjoying a prepared breakfast is at risk of dissipating with each crumb that needs tidying.
  6. Crispy Waffles – For breakfast, fika or lunch. It is hard to beat a still hot waffle topped with whipped cream and jam!
  7. A cup of really good coffee and a card. It doesn’t have to be complicated. Write a card and say thanks for being mamma and bring her a cup of coffee or tea. This one is our current favourite.

Picture credit: Peter Cassidy for Ryland Peters & Small / The ScandiKitchen Cookbook

Recipe: Bløtekake – Norwegian Celebration Cake

May 10, 2018 | Leave a comment

Recipe: Bløtekake - Norwegian Celebration Cake

‘Bløtekake’ (also ‘Bløtkake’) literally means soft cake – and is Norway’s version of a Victoria sponge. The difference is that a Bløtekake is lighter – as it is traditionally made with a fat free sponge, ie. a type of Genoise sponge.

Layered with seasonal berries or fruit and whipped cream it is a traditional celebration cake in Norway – enjoyed for any occasion from birthdays to weddings, anniversaries and leaving parties. Easy to tweak to your preferences and great to look at. Ticks all the boxes in our book! You can use any sponge cake recipe you like – this is the one Martina’s Norwegian mormor (maternal grandmother) has been using forever. The mix of regular flour and potato flour makes for an extra tender crumb.

You will need for the cake:

  • 4 eggs
  • 175g caster sugar
  • 60g flour
  • 60g potato flour (we use this one)
  • 1 ts baking powder

For the filling / assembly:

  • 50-100ml milk or orange juice
  • 300 ml whipping cream
  • 1 heaped teaspoon vanilla sugar (like this one)
  • 400g fresh berries and fruit of your choice (use whatever is in season – a mix of strawberries and raspberries is good, and some like sliced fresh banana in the middle, too)
  • Optional: 100ml of your favourite jam

Method:
Whisk eggs and sugar until pale, light and fluffy – we recommend a hand mixer for this – 5-10 minutes. Mix your flours and baking powder and sift into the egg mixture, then fold carefully to combine. Try not to lose the volume you got from the frantic whisking.

Pour into a well buttered cake mould with loose base covered in baking parchment.
Bake at 190-200 degrees for 30 minutes until cooked through. Leave to cool for 10 minuted before removing the mould. Let cool completely before using.

Assembly:
Slice your cake into two or three layers using a long serrated knife (or whatever works for you – just be careful to do it evenly all the way through). Splash each layer with a few tablespoonfuls of milk or orange juice to keep them moist and lovely.

Whip your cream with the vanilla sugar until soft peaks form – then, using manual labour, whip it for another 10-20 seconds until stiff enough to hold its shape. It is easy to overdo it with a mixer so we like using doing it by hand to finish. Rinse and prepare your fruit / berries and have ready in a bowl.

Place your bottom layer on your serving platter / cake stand and place strips of parchment paper all the way around, covering the plate. With a spatula, spread 1/4 of the whipped cream evenly across the cake (1/3 if only two layers). If using jam, dollop this evenly across the cream. Spread 1/3 of your fruit/berries over the top in an even layer. Repeat with the next layer, if your cake is 3 layers. If only two layers, proceed to the next step.

Place your final layer on top of the cream/jam/berry and try to align it neatly so it is not leaning that way or the other. Cover the top of the cake with the rest of the cream – covering the sides if you like. Arrange the remaining fresh fruit / berries across the top any way you like. Any extra ones can be dotted around the serving plate. When you have finished with the cream and berries, carefully remove the parchment paper to reveal the clean plate.

Best eaten immediately.

Koldskål & Kammerjunker – Danish buttermilk dessert

May 7, 2018 | Leave a comment

 

Koldskål & Kammerjunker – Danish buttermilk dessert

Ask any Danes and they’ll agree this dessert signifies the height of summer.

We stock this in our online shop and our café deli in London (get your stash right here), but if you fancy having a go at making it at home, here’s a great recipe that tastes ‘just right’.

This recipe requires the simple buttermilk usually sold in litres. You can find fresh buttermilk in larger supermarkets and in a lot of Eastern European shops, too. We prefer the Polish buttermilk that comes in one litre – some of the UK types can be a bit too thick.

‘Kammerjunker’ biscuits are crisp, but sweet, biscuits, lightly crushed or added whole to the soup. They need to be super crispy to carry the lightness of the soup, hence why they are returned to the oven after the initial first baking to ‘dry out’ and bake twice. If you cant be bothered to make the biscuits, fresh strawberries work really well too.

Ingredients

For the soup:
1 litre buttermilk
150ml Greek or natural yoghurt
2 egg yolks (this dessert contains raw egg yolk)
60g caster sugar
Seeds from 1 vanilla pod
Zest from ½ lemon
Juice from ¼ lemon

For the ‘Kammerjunker’ biscuits
150g flour
1 tsp baking powder
50g caster sugar
50g butter
1 egg
1 tsp good vanilla sugar or extract w seeds – or seeds from one vanilla pod
½ tsp ground cardamom (optional)
Zest from ½ lemon
2 tbsp cream

To serve
Seasonal fruit – strawberries, quartered

Method

To make the biscuits
Combine the baking powder with the flour. Add the cold butter, cubed, and mix in until you have grainy result. Add the sugar, then the other ingredients and mix again until you have an even dough.

Leave to chill for 20 minutes before rolling the dough.

Turn the oven to 200 degrees C

Roll the dough out and cut 35-40 small pieces, roll them and place them on a lined baking tray.

Bake for 7-10 minutes (depending on your oven). Remove from oven and cut each biscuit across the middle so you end up with two flat halves. Return to the warm oven and leave them to finish baking, at 170 degrees, for 8-10 more minutes OR until golden and crisp.

To make the soup/dessert

On high speed using a mixer with the whisk attachment, whisk egg yolk and sugar until white. Add the vanilla and lemon zest, then the yoghurt and start to add the buttermilk whilst continuously whisking.

Add lemon juice to taste – the soup should be sweet but have a good punch of lemon flavour coming through.

Serve the cold soup in bowls, topped with strawberries and biscuits.

This soup should really be eaten on day of making it as it contains raw egg.

The best summer slaw

May 6, 2018 | Leave a comment

 

Summer Slaw

Try Bronte’s summer coleslaw – for a lighter slaw. Recipe from her book ScandiKitchen Summer – out now!

There’s coleslaw and then there is coleslaw.

I love coleslaw, I really do, but I detest the gloopy factory-made rubbish that seems to have become standard fare in supermarkets all over. If you ask me, the secret to a good slaw is lightly pickling the cabbage base before adding a punchy, flavourful dressing.

Serves 4–6 as a side dish

Ingredients

CABBAGE BASE
300 g/5 cups shredded white and red cabbage
1 red onion
2 large (or 3 smaller) carrots
100 ml/1⁄3 cup plus 1 tablespoon water
100 ml/generous 1⁄3 cup plus
1 tablespoon white wine vinegar
3 generous tablespoons icing/confectioners’ sugar
1⁄2 teaspoon salt

DRESSING
3 generous tablespoons good quality mayonnaise
3 tablespoons buttermilk
1 tablespoon icing/confectioners’ sugar
1 teaspoon Dijon mustard
1 teaspoon white wine vinegar (only if needed)
1⁄2 teaspoon celery salt
1 teaspoon grated fresh horseradish or horseradish sauce
salt and freshly ground black pepper

TO SERVE
3 spring onions/scallions, sliced
50 g/generous 1⁄2 cup toasted, chopped walnuts
30–35 g/1⁄4 cup pumpkin seeds

Method

Place the shredded white and red cabbage in a large bowl. Finely slice the red onion into half rounds, and then grate (or julienne, if you can be bothered) the carrots and add both to the bowl. In another bowl or jug/pitcher, mix together the water, white wine vinegar, icing/confectioners’ sugar and salt. Pour over the cabbage, then cover the bowl and shake well. Leave for at least one hour, ideally two – shake it once in a while. You’re lightly sousing the cabbage, ensuring it is easier to eat and digest.

Press the cabbage free of excess vinegar liquid and leave in a sieve/strainer until excess vinegar has drained. The cabbage will now be softer and the onion appear almost a little cooked. Make sure the vinegar is well pressed out or the end result will be too acidic.

Mix together the ingredients for the dressing. Mix the dressing with the slaw and taste – it should be a bit tangy. If not, add a teaspoon extra of vinegar (this depends how much of the pickle juice was pressed out – it is easier to add a bit than remove if too much).

Just before serving, fold in the spring onion/scallions and toasted chopped walnuts. Sprinkle over the pumpkin seeds for extra crunch. This coleslaw is extra delicious on days two and three – when it will be pink (if you have used red cabbage).

Great served alongside the Beef Lindstroöm burgers or just as a side to most other summer dishes.

Beef Lindström Burgers

May 5, 2018 | Leave a comment

 

Beef Lindström Burgers

Hello sunshine, summer and barbecue season.

Well, it is not like we Scandinavians only BBQ in the summer. No no, we do it all year round, especially the Swedes and Norwegians who will happily step outside to grill those Wienerkorv sausages in minus 20 (it’s quite a thing in the Scandinavian ski resorts, this).

Over the next few days we will add some nice ideas for you to take to your garden and bring a bit of a Scandi flair to your BBQ.

From Bronte Aurell’s new book, ScandiKitchen Summer, comes this lovely take on the Swedish classic Biff Lindström – in her book, she decided to make them into burgers. A classic combo of ground beef and beetroot – with an egg on top. The book does not contain a recipe for the rye burger buns, so we have added those at the end here. If you can’t be bothered to bake your own burger buns, go for a nice brioche bun.

Beef Lindström Burgers
Bronte Aurell

Serves 4

One of the most famous burgers in Sweden, the biff à la Lindström is named after Henrik Lindström, a prominent industrialist with Swedish parents, who grew up in St Petersburg in Russia. On holidays in Sweden, he taught the chef at his hotel how to make this burger with capers and beetroot/beet. It became a hit across the country – and rightly so as the combination is super-nice. The traditional way of serving these is without the bun and with potatoes on the side. We used to make it like this at home, until my burger-loving kids suggested we add a bun and have it with coleslaw one sunny day.

Sometimes, having Anglo-Scandinavian children who are not bound by ‘how things are usually done in Scandinavia’ means we can find new ways of enjoying old classics. The patties are quite fragile, so be aware of this if you plan to stick them on the BBQ.

Ingredients

500 g/18 oz. minced/ground beef
good pinch of salt
1 onion, finely chopped
100 g/31⁄2 oz. pickled beetroot/beet, finely chopped
40 g/11⁄2 oz. pickled cucumber or gherkins, finely chopped
2 tablespoons capers, roughly chopped
1 medium cooked white potato
(approx. 80 g/3 oz.), peeled and
roughly mashed
4 egg yolks
1 teaspoon Dijon mustard
salt and freshly ground black pepper
olive oil or rapeseed oil and butter, for frying
4 eggs, to serve

Method

Put the minced/ground beef and salt in a stand mixer with the paddle attachment. Mix for around 1 minute on medium speed. Alternatively, you can mix for a little longer in a large bowl with a wooden spoon.

Add the onion, beetroot/beet, pickled cucumber or gherkins, capers, cooked potato, egg yolks and mustard. Season with salt and black pepper. Mix again until all the ingredients are evenly incorporated (but not too long or the burger will become tough).

Shape the mixture into 4 burgers and leave them to rest for 30 minutes in the fridge before frying.

Preheat the oven to 120°C (250°F) Gas 1/2.

Heat the oil and butter in a frying pan/skillet. Fry the burgers (in batches if needed, depending on the size of your pan) over a high heat for about 3–4 minutes on each side, depending on how you like your beef to be cooked.

Once cooked, pop the beef patties in the oven to keep warm and fry the eggs sunny-side up in the same frying pan/skillet. Serve each beef patty on a lightly toasted burger bun with the fried egg on top. Serve with summer slaw and condiments on the side.

To serve:
Seeded rye burger buns or buns of your choice, toasted
Summer Slaw, condiments of your choice

Bonus recipe: Rye Burger Buns

These buns are light and fluffy and go well with the Swedish Biff Lindstrom Burger.

Makes 8 buns

Ingredients

25g fresh yeast (or 13g dry active)
150ml lukewarm water (36-37C)
150ml lukewarm whole milk
50g light brown sugar
1 egg (plus ½ egg for the glaze)

200g dark rye flour
400g White bread flour
1 ½ tsp salt
80g soft butter

Black (or white) sesame seeds to decorate
½ egg to glaze

Method

Add the yeast to a mixing bowl and then add the sugar and milk and water. Mix until everything has dissolved.

Add the rye flour and then start adding the white flour and salt. Add the egg and the butter. Keep kneading on a medium setting – around five minutes – adding as much flour as needed as you go. You may need more or less than stated here. Your dough should be sticky – cover with cling film and leave to rise for around an hour until doubled in size.

Line your baking sheets.

Knead the dough through and cut into 7-9 pieces depending on the sizing of your buns. Roll the pieces into even and uniform rolls and place on the baking sheet, a good distance apart (5-6 cm). Leave to rise under a damp teatowel until doubled in size again (could be another hour, but times vary).

Turn the oven to 180C

Brush the buns lightly with egg wash and add the black sesame seed (or use light brown ones, if you prefer – I just like the contrast of the dark seeds). Its always a good idea to keep the moisture in the oven when you bake these – so I always add a bowl of water to the bottom shelf of the oven.

Bake for about 12-14 minutes or until baked through – it depends on your oven. Remove from oven and allow to cool before using. These buns freeze well.

Get the book ScandiKitchen Summer here. Published by Ryland Peters and Small with beautiful photographs by Pete Cassidy.

Rye Banana Bread & Cinnamon Butter

March 28, 2018 | Leave a comment

 

Rye Banana Bread & Cinnamon Butter

A recipe from our new book ScandiKitchen Summer – out now, published by Ryland Peters and Small and available in all good bookshops.

At our cafe, people used to ask for banana bread a lot. As it’s not a really traditional Scandinavian thing, we wanted to make it our own with a ‘Scandi’ twist. So, we created this version with added rye flour to make it more wholesome. We like to serve it with a delicious cinnamon butter that just melts on slices of this loaf when toasted.

Makes 1 loaf

Ingredients
125 g/11⁄8 sticks butter 150 g/3⁄4 cup dark brown soft sugar
4 very ripe bananas
100 g/1⁄2 cup Greek yogurt
1 tablespoon lemon juice
1 teaspoon vanilla extract or vanilla sugar
125 g/1 scant cup plain/all-purpose flour
125 g/11⁄4 cups whole rye flour 1⁄2 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon bicarbonate of soda/baking soda
2 UK large/US extra-large eggs cinnamon butter to serve (optional)

Equipment: a 500 g/ 1 lb loaf pan, lined with baking parchment

Method

Preheat the oven to 180°C (350°F) Gas 4.

In a stand mixer with the paddle attachment, cream together the butter and dark brown soft sugar.

Meanwhile, mash the bananas and mix with the yogurt, lemon juice and vanilla and set aside.
Mix the flours with the salt and bicarbonate of soda/baking soda and set aside.

When the butter and sugar are creamy and well combined, add the eggs one at the time, scraping down the sides of the bowl between each addition to ensure they are fully incorporated.

Add the mashed banana mixture and mix until incorporated, then add the flours and mix briefly until smooth. Do not over mix.

Bake in the middle of the preheated oven for around
30 minutes. – Check with a skewer – it is done when the middle just comes out clean. Leave to cool. Serve toasted with cinnamon butter (see below).

Cinnamon butter
Mix 3 tablespoons of strong cinnamon sugar (half and half) with half a packet of soft butter – re-chill and use as needed.

Recipe: Solskinnsboller

March 16, 2018 | Leave a comment

Solskinnsboller – Norwegian Custard Cinnamon Swirls

Of all the things to come out of Norway (brown cheese, knitted jumpers, a dabbing prince), these ‘Solskinnsboller’ buns must be amongst the tastiest. Don’t need another bun recipe? Listen. We think you do. These are named sunshine buns because they have the same effect – they make you happy. Buttery, soft cinnamon swirls with a gooey vanilla custard centre. Cinnamon buns = good. Custard = good. These buns? Criminal.

You will need:

  • 1 quantity bun dough (your favourite – or our favourite, recipe here)
  • 1 quantity creme patisserie or thick custard (homemade or bought – but if the latter thicken it with a bit of cornflour first or it will be too runny.

Quick and easy vanilla custard cream

  • 2 egg yolks
  • 1 tbsp corn flour
  • 3 tbsp caster sugar
  • 2 tsp vanilla sugar (or 1 tsp vanilla paste)
  • 200 ml whole milk

Method: In a medium size saucepan, heat the milk until steaming (do not let it boil). Remove from heat. In a bowl, whisk together egg yolks, corn flour, sugar and vanilla until a thick paste. Whilst whisking, pour a little of the hot milk into the egg/sugar mixture until combined. Continue adding the hot milk slowly until everything is combined. Return to the saucepan and let simmer over medium heat until thickened – whisk continuously to avoid lumps forming. Once thickened (you should be able to make soft blobs that don’t disappear immediately – it will thicken more when it cools) pour into a bowl and place clingfilm directly onto the top of the custard. This avoids a skin forming. Leave to cool completely – the fridge quickens this step.

Assembling the buns:

Make you cinnamon buns as normal and leave under a tea towel for 25-30 mins to rise a bit more. Place your creme patisserie in a piping bag or plastic bag.

Now, you need to make an indent in each bun to fit the creme pat in – press down in the middle with your finger (or something measuring about 2cm diameter) until you have even indents in every bun. Pipe a small amount of custard into each hollow. Don’t be tempted to use too much – it will just get messy (but still tasty). 1-2 tsp should be enough.

Bake at 220 degrees celsius for 10-15 minutes or until golden brown.

Västerbotten cheese & spinach waffles

March 15, 2018 | 1 Comment

 

Västerbotten cheese & spinach waffles

Västerbottensost våflor med spenat

Soon, it will be time for the annual Waffle Day (25th March) – this is one of the recipes we’ll be serving in the cafe next week to celebrate.

We make these waffles on cold days when the rain and sleet forces us to cosy up inside. This is the perfect low-effort snack – just throw everything together and cook in the waffle iron. Some of us love adding crispy pancetta/bacon pieces to this – but you can keep it veggie, too.

Ingredients

100 g/1 stick butter, melted, plus extra for greasing
150 g/1 cup plain/ all-purpose flour
75 g/1/2 cup wholegrain spelt flour
2 teaspoons baking powder
75 g/3/4 cup finely grated Västerbotten cheese (or mature/sharp Cheddar)
100 g/1/2 cup blanched, cooked spinach, or 3–4 frozen balls (defrosted), liquid squeezed out and chopped
a pinch of salt
freshly ground black pepper

150 g/11/2 cups chopped, cooked smoked bacon pieces/pancetta (optional)
sour cream, to serve

– A heart-shaped waffle iron – available online. You can use a different shaped iron, but cooking time and yield may vary

MAKES 7–8

Method

Heat up the waffle iron and brush with melted butter.

Combine all the ingredients (apart from the sour cream) together with 350 ml/11/2 cups water and stir to incorporate and form a smooth, thick batter.

Add a ladle of batter to the hot waffle iron. Close the lid and cook for 2–3 minutes or until golden brown.
Remove from the pan and serve immediately with sour cream if liked.

Recipe taken from Bronte Aurell’s book Fika & Hygge, published by Ryland Peters & Small – photo by Pete Cassidy. Buy it here, it’s a nice book.

Things to do with Brown Cheese

| Leave a comment

 

Things to do with Brown Cheese

Ask any Norwegian and they will tell you that brown cheese – also known as Brunost or Geitost – is the most popular cheese in the whole of Norway.

Brown, you may ask, why is it brown? Well, it is brown because the milk has been allowed to boil, thus caramelizing the milk sugars and turning the cheese a darker, caramel colour. Yes, it is a goats cheese with caramel flavour. We know, it sounds strange, but truly, it’s pretty awesome (unless you are part of the anti-brown cheese people – it is a bit like Marmite, you either love it or hate it).

We stock a few different kinds. The main one is called Gudbrandsdalen and is made with half goat’s milk and half cow’s milk. You can also get the blue one called Ekte Geitost (Real Goat’s Cheese) which is made with 100% goats milk and has a stronger taste.

Brunost brown cheese is eaten sliced on bread. Often, it is also served sliced on top of freshly baked waffles. Can also be added sliced to cardamom buns or lefse wraps.

We wanted to try and find other uses for it, so we have had a play around with it and we decided – after mucho testing – that Brunost Mac’n’Cheese is the bees knees and we’ll be making this from now on – find the recipe below.

You can also use left over bits of brown cheese in your gravy – just add a few lumps and leave to melt, it is super nice as it has a very umami flavour.

Brown cheese can also be cooked up with condensed milk to make a lovely umami dulce de leche that works very well with apple cakes and pies. Lastly, in Norway, cafes are now selling Brown Cheese Ice cream, too. Plenty of things to try out!

Brunost Mac’n’Cheese

Serves 2 people

300g Macaroni pasta, uncooked

Sauce
25g butter
25g plain flour
Approx 400-500ml whole milk
100g grated cheddar
50g grated brown cheese (Gudbrandsdalen)
1 tsp dijon mustard
3-4 tbsp vinegar (taste it)
Salt, pepper
Handful of breadcrumbs

Optional – 50g chopped crispy fried pancetta (our Jonas preferred it with bacon).

Method

Cook the pasta until al dente, drain.

Melt the butter in a saucepan – and keep it going until it turns light brown, then add the flour and stir. Start adding the milk, bit by bit, whilst whisking. You may not need all the milk – you want a thick sauce, but not runny. Keep bringing to the boil to assess.

When the sauce is done, turn off the heat and stir in the cheddar and 30g of the brown cheese and combine until melted. Add the mustard, salt and pepper and taste – it will be quite sweet, so you need to add some vinegar, try 2 tbsp first and then if more is needed, add.

Add the pasta to the sauce and stir, then add to an oven proof bowl. Scatter the rest of the brown cheese on top and then add a thin layer of breadcrumb. Place in a hot oven for around 10-15 minutes until the top is crispy and bubbling and the brown cheese has melted.

Serve with a side salad. Pure comfort!

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