Tag Archives: recipe

Danish Æbleskiver (little Christmas pancake treats)

November 23, 2017 | Leave a comment

 

Danish Christmas Pancakes (æbleskiver)

Danes love eating Æbleskiver on Sundays in advent – this recipe is from our cookbook ‘Fika & Hygge’

Danish Christmas Pancakes (æbleskiver)

3 eggs, separated
300 ml buttermilk
100 ml double cream
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
1 tablespoon caster sugar
½ teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon baking powder
½ teaspoon bicarbonate of soda
1 teaspoon ground cardamom
250 g plain flour
grated zest of 1 medium lemon (or to taste)
50g butter, melted for frying
icing sugar, for dusting
raspberry jam, for dipping (optional)

You need: an ‘æbleskive’ pan, Japanese takoyaki pan. If you use a frying pan, they will look like mini pancakes instead.

MAKES 30

Mix together the egg yolks, buttermilk, double cream and vanilla extract in a large mixing bowl. In a separate bowl, sift together all the dry ingredients including the cardamom.

In another clean bowl, whisk the egg whites until stiff using a handheld electric whisk on high speed.

Add the egg and cream mixture to the dry ingredients, then carefully fold in the beaten egg whites and lemon zest. Leave to rest for 30 minutes in the refrigerator before using.

Place the pan over high heat to warm through and add a little melted butter to the pan to stop the pancakes from sticking. If you are using an æbleskive pan, carefully add enough batter to each hole so that it reaches about 0.25 cm from the top. If you are using a normal frying pan, add spoonfuls of batter as you would if making normal small pancakes. Leave to cook for a few minutes until the edges become firm then, using a fork or knitting needle (knitting needle is easier!), gently turn the pancakes over to cook on the other side. If you have filled the holes too much, this can be tricky – you’ll get the hang of it after a few.

Once browned on both sides (3–4 minutes per batch), keep the cooked æbleskiver warm in the oven until you have finished frying.

Serve dusted with icing sugar and a little pot of raspberry jam for dipping.

Recipe from Fika & Hygge published by Ryland Peters Small – priced £16.99. Photo by the amazing @PeteCassidy.

Havregrynskugler / Chokladbullar / Oat & Chocolate Balls

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No bake easy Scandi oat & chocolate treats

Chokladbullar / Havregrynskugler / No-bake Oat & Chocolate Treats

Here’s an easy recipe for you. No baking required.

Makes approx. 40

Ingredients
250g butter
400g rolled oats
175g caster sugar
4 tbsp cocoa powder
4 tbsp strong, cooled coffee
1 tsp vanilla sugar
Desiccated coconut, sugar sprinkles or pearl sugar, to decorate

Method
1. Blitz all the ingredients, except the coconut, sugar sprinkles or pearl sugar, in a food processor, or mix by hand (but allow the butter to soften before doing so).
2. Put the mixture in the fridge to firm up a bit before using or it can be a bit too sticky. Add more oats if you feel the mixture is too soft.
3. Roll into 2.5cm diameter balls, then roll each ball in either desiccated coconut, sugar sprinkles or pearl sugar.
4. Firm up in the fridge before eating — they will keep for up to a week in the fridge.

Recipes taken from The Scandi Kitchen by Bronte Aurell (Ryland Peters & Small, £16.99). Photo by Pete Cassidy.

Recipe: Gingerbread Buns

November 16, 2017 | Leave a comment

 

Gingerbread Buns

For a wintery, Christmassy twist on your classic cinnamon buns we have replaced the traditional all cinnamon filling for the classic gingerbread spices. Very, very good with a cup of strong coffee.

Basic bun dough:

13 g/2 ½ teaspoons dried/active dry yeast or 25 g/1 oz. fresh yeast *(see below)
250 ml/1 cup whole milk, heated to 36–37°C (97–99°F)
80 g/ ¾ stick butter, melted and cooled slightly
40 g/3 tablespoons caster/granulated sugar
400–500 g/3–3 2/3cups white strong/bread flour
2 teaspoons ground cardamom
1 teaspoon salt
1 egg, beaten

Filling:

120g soft butter (we use salted, here)
50g white caster sugar
50g light brown sugar
1-2 tbsp gingerbread spice mix depending on how spiced you like it (ready mix or make your own – see below)

Cream all the ingredients in a bowl until smooth.

Gingerbread spice mix:
yield; approx 2 tbsp
1.5 tsp ground cinnamon
1.5 tsp ground ginger
1 tsp ground cloves
1 tsp ground cardamom

Here’s how to do it:

If using fresh yeast, add the warm milk to a mixing bowl and add the yeast; stir until dissolved, then pour into the bowl of the food mixer.

(If using active dry yeast (granules), pour the warm milk into a bowl, sprinkle in the yeast and whisk together. Cover with clingfilm and leave in a warm place for about 15 minutes to become bubbly. Pour into the bowl of a food mixer fitted with a dough hook).

Start the machine and add the cooled, melted butter. Allow to combine with the yeast for 1 minute or so, then add the sugar. Allow to combine for 1 minute.

In a separate bowl, weigh out 400 g/3 cups of the flour, add the cardamom and salt and mix together. Start adding the flour and spices into the milk mixture, bit by bit. Add half the beaten egg. Keep kneading for 5 minutes. You may need to add more flour – you want the mixture to end up a bit sticky, but not so much that it sticks to your finger if you poke it. It is better not to add too much flour as this will result in dry buns. You can always add more later.

Once mixed, leave the dough in a bowl and cover with a dish towel or clingfilm. Allow to rise for around 30 minutes or until it has doubled in size. Dust a table top with flour and turn out the dough. Using your hands, knead the dough and work in more flour if needed. Using a rolling pin, roll out the dough to a 40 x 50 cm/16 x 20 in. rectangle.

Spread the filling across the dough in an event, thin layer.

To twist or roll?

To make traditional swirls, simply roll the dough lengthways into a long roll and cut into 15-16 pieces, place on a lined baking tray, and leave – covered – to rise for another 20 minutes.

Twists: Follow this simply video to make your cinnamon bun twists:

When you have done your twists, leave on a lined baking tray for 20 minutes to rise again.

Heat the oven to 200 degrees Celcius (fan). Brush the buns lightly with beaten egg, then bake for 6-9 minutes or until golden and done. Watch it, they can burn easily and different ovens vary in temperature.

While they are baking, make a simple sugar syrup: In a saucepan, heat 50ml water with 100g sugar until bubbling and completely melted. You can also use golden syrup and just melt it a big in a saucepan.

When the buns come out of the oven, immediately brush lightly with the syrup, then add pearl sugar (nibbed sugar) (if using) on top of the buns and cover with a damp tea towel. The tea towel stops the buns from going dry. We also like these just sprinkled with icing sugar which gives a nice, frosted feel.

Good luck!

Recipe: Rum treats & Halloween ghosts “Romkugler”

October 26, 2017 | Leave a comment

 

Recipe: RUM TREATS & HALLOWEEN GHOSTS “Romkugler”

A true ‘waste not want not’ treat. Every Danish bakery has loads of cakes that are, like these Romkugler or rum balls, basically made from leftover pastries. It makes a lot of sense or bakers to and ways to use their leftovers in really delicious ways. It is best to avoid using leftovers containing raisins or strong flavours, as these will come through in the end result. Use a cinnamon swirl or two, some sponge cake and maybe some chocolate cake or a muffin. It’s a good idea to freeze leftovers as you have them – and once you have enough, make a batch of ‘rum balls’ (Romkugler) for afternoon fika.

Ingredients

500 g leftover Danish pastries and/or cake – ideally mixture of both
2–3 tablespoons good quality raspberry jam
100 g icing sugar (add less if your cakes are a really sweet variety)
100 g softened butter
2 tablespoons cocoa powder
1 tsp vanilla essence
2–3 teaspoons rum extract or essence (I use quite a concentrated one – you may need to add a bit more, as you want it to have a good punchy flavour)
A handful of oats (optional)
Dark or light chocolate vermicelli strands, to decorate if you’re making the balls
OR 300g White Marzipan or icing if making the ghosts.

MAKES 10–15 balls or ghosts.

How to

Roughly tear any Danish pastries into bite-sized pieces and crumble up any cakes you are using. In a stand mixer using the paddle attachment or in a food processor, blend the shredded and crumbled pastries and cakes with the rest of the ingredients (apart from the oats and the chocolate vermicelli) until evenly mixed.

Taste the mixture – it may need more cocoa powder, rum extract
 or even icing/confectioners’ sugar. Because this is made with leftovers, the taste will vary a lot. If you feel it needs more texture you can add
a handful of oats.

Chill the mixture in the refrigerator for about an hour to firm up.

Roll into balls a bit larger than the size of a golf ball and roll in the chocolate vermicelli strands to evenly coat. Chill again in the refrigerator until you are ready to serve.

If making little ghosts, roll out your icing/marzipan with icing sugar, then cut rounds out that will cover the balls. Shape gentle upwards to create taller ghosts – and then add eyes with icing or stick out using a toothpick.

Rum treats will keep well for 2–3 days wrapped in cling film/plastic wrap and stored in the refrigerator.

Base recipe is available in our book Fika & Hygge, published by RPS, photography by Pete Cassidy (the main one, not the ghosts photo, we did that in the cafe so don’t pin that on him: he’s really amazing and we’re not very good at photos)

Recipe: Sally’s ‘Chokladbullar’ (Soft chocolate buns)

October 6, 2017 | Leave a comment

 

Sally’s Chokladbullar – soft chocolate buns

These delicious chocolate buns come from our Sally who used to work at our café (Hi Sally, if you’re reading this). We felt that just using chocolate spread doesn’t work because it burns easily, but mixing it to a paste with some extra chocolate helps make the most indulgent and chocolatey buns possible. These are pretty hard to resist, for kids and adults. From our book Fika & Hygge by Bronte Aurell.

MAKES 16

Cinnamon bun basic dough (use this as a base)
13 g/21/2 teaspoons dried/active dry yeast or 25 g/1 oz. fresh yeast
250 ml/1 cup whole milk, heated to 36–37°C (97–99°F)
80 g/3/ 4 stick butter, melted and cooled slightly
40 g/3 tablespoons caster/granulated sugar
400–500 g/3–3 2/3 cups white strong/bread flour
2 teaspoons ground cardamom
1 teaspoon salt
1 egg, beaten

FILLING:
50 g/ 3 1/2 tablespoons butter, softened
75 g/1/3 cup plus 2 teaspoons light brown soft sugar
4 large heaped tablespoons chocolate hazelnut spread (such as Nutella)
1 tablespoon plain/allpurpose flour
50 g/2 oz. good-qualitymilk/semisweet chocolate,
chopped (I use Lindt or Marabou)
beaten egg, for brushing
2–3 tablespoons golden/light corn or date syrup
a generous handful of toasted hazelnuts, roughly chopped
a baking pan with sides, greased and lined with baking parchment

Prepare the dough:

If using fresh yeast, add the warm milk to a mixing bowl and add the yeast; stir until dissolved, then pour into the bowl of the food mixer. If using dried/active dry yeast, pour the warm milk into a bowl, sprinkle in the yeast and whisk together. Cover with clingfilm/plastic wrap and leave in a warm place for about 15 minutes to become bubbly. Pour into the bowl of a food mixer fitted with a
dough hook.

Mix in the cooled, melted butter. Allow to combine for 1 minute or so, then add the sugar. In a separate bowl, weigh out 400 g/3 cups of the flour, add the cardamom and salt and mix. Start adding the flour and spices into the milk mixture, bit by bit. Add half the beaten egg.
Keep kneading for 5 minutes. You may need to add more flour – you want the mixture to end up a bit sticky. It is better not to add too much flour as this will result in dry buns. You can always add more later. Cover the dough with clingfilm/plastic wrap. Allow to rise for around 30 minutes or until it has doubled in size.

In a food processor or stand mixer, combine the butter, light brown soft sugar, chocolate hazelnut spread and flour and blend until you have a smooth, spreadable mixture. Set aside.

Turn the dough out onto a lightly floured surface and knead it through. Roll the dough out to a large rectangle of around 30 x 40 cm/113/4 x 16 inches. Spread the chocolate filling in an even layer across the dough.

Scatter with the chopped milk/semisweet chocolate. Roll the dough up tightly lengthways to form a long sausage, then cut into 16 even pieces using a knife or pizza cutter. Squash the buns tightly together into the prepared baking pan if you would prefer a traybake to tear and share (pictured).
Or if you want to make individual buns then space them spread out evenly on two larger baking sheets. Cover with a kitchen cloth and leave to rise for a further 20 minutes.

Preheat the oven to 200°C (400°F) Gas 6. Brush the buns with a little beaten egg, then bake in the
preheated oven for around 8–10 minutes or until golden brown. Remove the buns from the oven, then brush immediately with the golden/light corn or date syrup. Decorate each bun with toasted chopped hazelnuts. Immediately place a damp, clean kitchen cloth on top for a few minutes to prevent the buns from going dry.

 

Photo by Pete Cassidy. Book published by Ryland, Peters and Small.

Recipe: The Best Cinnamon Buns (Kanelbullar)

September 28, 2017 | 3 Comments

Cinnamon Bun Week

Photo credit – Pete Cassidy (fro our book ScandiKitchen Fika & Hygge)

Next week is the most wonderful week of the year – cinnamon bun week! That’s right, from October 2nd through October 8th we’re celebrating the humble cinnamon bun.

We want YOU to bake with us. Yes, like GBBO, but only buns. Using your own recipe or one you are trying out, get baking! Get the kids involved or bake on your own, whatever way you decide to make buns, make them with love and determination.

Once you are done, take a picture and send it to us iloveherring@scandikitchen.co.uk (just one pic, please) OR you can tag us on Twitter (@scanditwitchen) on Instagram (@scandikitchen) – using the hash tag #showusyourbuns. ee will find your buns and we’ll retweet or post to insta for the best ones – so the world can see your beautiful creations. Best thing? You can win a copy of our new book Nørth and a big box of Scandinavian goodies (we’re talking chocolate, liquorice and more).

Need inspiration? Here’s a recipe:

The recipe below is taken from our cookbook The ScandiKitchen by Bronte Aurell – published by Ryland, Peters and Small available at all good bookshops (and of course – signed – at our place).

Note: Fresh yeast can be hard to find in shops here – we stock fresh yeast in our web shop; we also have a cinnamon bun product bundle containing the essential ingredients you need to make your own buns. On to the buns.

Cinnamon Bun Recipe – BASIC DOUGH

  • 13 g/2 ½ teaspoons dried/active dry yeast or 25 g/1 oz. fresh yeast *(see below)
  • 250 ml/1 cup whole milk, heated to 36–37°C (97–99°F)
  • 80 g/ ¾ stick butter, melted and cooled slightly
  • 40 g/3 tablespoons caster/granulated sugar
  • 400–500 g/3–3 2/3cups white strong/bread flour
  • 2 teaspoons ground cardamom
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 egg, beaten

Filling:

  • 80g butter
  • 1 teaspoon plain flour
  • 1-2 tablespoons ground cinnamon
  • 1/2 tsp ground cardamom
  • 1/2 tsp vanilla sugar
  • 80g caster sugar (or half and half caster / soft brown sugar)
  • Egg, for brushing.Cream all the ingredients for filling together until smooth.

Here’s how to do it:

If using fresh yeast, add the warm milk to a mixing bowl and add the yeast; stir until dissolved, then pour into the bowl of the food mixer.

(If using active dry yeast (granules), pour the warm milk into a bowl, sprinkle in the yeast and whisk together. Cover with clingfilm and leave in a warm place for about 15 minutes to become bubbly. Pour into the bowl of a food mixer fitted with a dough hook).

Start the machine and add the cooled, melted butter. Allow to combine with the yeast for 1 minute or so, then add the sugar. Allow to combine for 1 minute.

In a separate bowl, weigh out 400 g/3 cups of the flour, add the cardamom and salt and mix together. Start adding the flour and spices into the milk mixture, bit by bit. Add half the beaten egg. Keep kneading for 5 minutes. You may need to add more flour – you want the mixture to end up a bit sticky, but not so much that it sticks to your finger if you poke it. It is better not to add too much flour as this will result in dry buns. You can always add more later.

Once mixed, leave the dough in a bowl and cover with a dish towel or clingfilm. Allow to rise for around 30 minutes or until it has doubled in size. Dust a table top with flour and turn out the dough. Using your hands, knead the dough and work in more flour if needed. Using a rolling pin, roll out the dough to a 40 x 50 cm/16 x 20 in. rectangle.

Spread the filling across the dough in an event, thin layer.

To twist or roll?

To make traditional swirls, simply roll the dough lengthways into a long roll and cut into 15-16 pieces, place on a lined baking tray, and leave – covered – to rise for another 20 minutes.

Twists: Follow this simply video to make your cinnamon bun twists:

When you have done your twists, leave on a lined baking tray for 20 minutes to rise again.

Heat the oven to 200 degrees Celcius (fan). Brush the buns lightly with beaten egg, then bake for 6-9 minutes or until golden and done. Watch it, they can burn easily and different ovens vary in temperature.

While they are baking, make a simple sugar syrup: In a saucepan, heat 50ml water with 100g sugar until bubbling and completely melted. You can also use golden syrup and just melt it a big in a saucepan.

When the buns come out of the oven, immediately brush lightly with the syrup, then add pearl sugar (nibbed sugar) on top of the buns and cover with a damp tea towel. the tea towel stops the buns from going dry. If you cannot get hold of nib sugar (pearl sugar), you can use chopped hazelnuts etc instead as an alternative.

Cinnamon Bun Recipes

September 27, 2017 | Leave a comment

Our Favourite Cinnamon Bun Recipes

There are as many cinnamon bun recipes as there are parents and grandparents – each claiming theirs to be the ultimate one, producing the softest, most cinnamon-y, comforting little bakes ever. But really – how wrong can you go when it comes to cinnamon buns? We are yet to meet a bun we didn’t enjoy.

Here are some of our favourite recipes – in no particular order.

  1. Classic Cinnamon Buns. Our go to dough for buns – sometimes filled with cinnamon, other times jazzed up with chocolate Always delicious – and easy to do.
  2. Filled Vanilla Buns. 6 different ways to fill a classic bun dough – we particularly love the blueberry version.
  3. Social Cinnamon Bun ‘Wreath’ – a lovely variation on the classic buns in a lovely big sharing version.
  4. Scandi Saffron Buns. Fragrant and aromatic – these are traditionally enjoyed in early December for St. Lucia – but they taste just as good now.
    Cinnamon Twists Bronte Aurell ScandiKitchen

    Phoro credit: Peter Cassidy, for Ryland Peters.

Vanilla buns, six ways.

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Vanilla buns, six ways

Once you are bored with cinnamon buns, where do you go?

Vanilla is where it’s at. This week, we decided to make a few different versions using the same base dough and basic filling.

There are as many recipes for buns in Sweden as there are people who bake them. We like this one: it’s simple, it’s straightforward and it just works. It forms a great base from which to experiment with your own flavours and fillings. The addition of egg to the dough makes the dough richer than usual. We’ve upped the butter, too – again, you can reduce it but we think it works well with the vanilla.

This recipe makes about 36 Vanilla buns of medium size.

Dough Ingredients

50g fresh yeast

500ml whole milk, luke warm

200g very soft butter (melted also fine)

80g caster sugar

1000 g plain bread flour (or between 800-1000g, depending on the flour)  – we always use Swedish Vetemjol flour for perfect results.

1⁄2 tsp salt

2 tsp ground cardamom

1 egg

 

Filling for Vanilla buns (filling #1, used also in 2-5)

175g butter (soft, spreadable)

4-5 tsp vanilla sugar (we prefer torslefs vanilla sugar)

Seeds from one vanilla pod

150g normal sugar

1 egg for brushing

100-150g of pearl sugar to decorate

 

The dough:

Heat the milk to 36-41 degrees and add in a bowl with the yeast, stir until dissolved. Add the butter, sugar, salt, cardamom, egg and enough flour to make the dough combine. You’ll need about 700-800g of flour – but add a little at the time, keeping the mixer on continuously (using the dough hook). Keep the rest of the flour back for kneading. Work the dough until it almost stops sticking and has a shiny surface – about 6-7 minutes with a mixer, longer by hand (add more flour if you need to). The dough should only just reach the point of not being sticky.

While the dough is rising, whisk butter and vanilla together until smooth and spreadable.

Leave dough to rise until it’s doubled in size (30-40 mins). Work through with more flour until dough stops sticking and can be shaped, then cut the dough in half and roll out the first piece in a rectangular shape (around 45cm x 35cm). Spread a generous amount of the vanilla butter evenly, then roll the piece lengthways so you end up with a long, tight thin roll. Cut 18 slices of the dough and place each swirl onto your baking tray – a good space apart from each other as they will rise again.

Repeat with second half of dough. Leave to rise for 20 minutes.

To make buns with the rest of the the dough:

Turn the oven to 220 degrees (a bit less if using a fan oven).

Brush all buns gently with remaining egg (you may need a bit more egg) and sprinkle a bit of pearl sugar on each bun. Bake at 220°C for about 8-10 minutes (turn the heat down a bit midway if you feel they’re getting too brown) for the buns – but for the longer rolls, turn the heat down slightly and bake nearer the bottom of the oven for around 20 minutes – take care not to burn them. As this dough contains sugar, the buns can go dark brown in a split second, so keep an eye on them.

As soon as the buns come out of the oven, cool down under a damp, clean tea towel to stop them going dry. If you prefer a stickier surface, brush with a light sugar syrup or normal light syrup as soon as they are baked.

The buns freeze well (freeze in plastic bags as soon as they have cooled).

 

Filling option #2

Vanilla and Crème Patisserie

Either make a batch of crème patisserie or simply make a portion of instant vanilla creme – whisk 400ml whole milk with 1 sachet of power, leave to stand for 15 minutes and its ready to use.

Follow recipe as above – but before rolling the buns tight, spread a thin layer of vanilla cream across the dough, then roll and proceed as recipe.

Filling option #3

Blueberrries

With or without the vanilla crème, add fresh or frozen blueberries to the dough before rolling. Simply scatter a handful of blueberries and then roll and slice.

Filling option #4

Tart berries

With out without the vanilla crème, add fresh cloudberries (or frozen) to the dough before rolling. Simply scatter a small amount of berries across, roll and slice.

Filling option #5

Marzipan & Vanilla knots

Roll dough out and in the recipe. Take half a packet of Mandelmasse, marzipan (or similar graded marzipan) and grate about 100g across the dough. (after you have added the vanilla sugar)

Instead of rolling the dough, simply fold it in half lengthways – then cut into 18 strips and make bun ‘knots’. You can check out this video for hints of how to make bun knots – it’s surprisingly easy and it distributes the filling well.

Filling option #6

‘Skoleboller’ – School buns.

Most popular in Norway, these buns are super lovely. For this version, you do not need the vanilla sugar – but you do need the crème patisserie.

Shape the dough into 36 round balls and place on baking trays. Press each ball a bit flat and make an indent in the middle. Add a large teaspoon of vanilla crème patisserie to each bun and leave to rise for about 15 minutes. Bake as directed in recipe.

Once removed from oven, let cool for a bit then pipe out some icing (icing sugar mixed with a teeny bit of warm water) on each bun. Place your desiccated coconut in a soup bowl and dip the bun, icing side down, into the coconut.

 

    Jästbolagets Kronjäst – Fresh Yeast 2 x 50g
    £0.99 £0.79
    - +

 

How to make… Cinnamon buns / Kanelbullar

September 26, 2017 | 5 Comments

 

Recipe: Lovely Cinnamon Buns

Kanelbullar, Swedes call them. Skillingsboller or kanelboller in Norway – kanelsnegl a Dane may say. Cinnamon buns. Those delightful soft rolls, perfect for a Fika afternoon cup of coffee or as a snack treat in your lunch box.

This recipe makes about 36 buns of medium size – or 18 buns and two longer ‘Kanellängd’ (longer versions for slicing).

There are as many recipes for cinnamon buns in Sweden as there are people who bake them. We like this one: it’s simple, it’s straightforward and it just works.

Over time, as you get a feel for the dough, you’ll develop your own version that only you can recreate. Try different fillings, spices and nuts.

Ingredients

  • 50g fresh yeast
  • 500ml whole milk, luke warm
  • 150g very soft butter (melted also fine)
  • 85g caster sugar
  • 1000 g plain bread flour (or between 800-1000g, depending on the flour)  – we always use Swedish Vetemjol flour for perfect results.
  • 1⁄2 tsp salt
  • 2 tsp ground cardamom
  • 1/2 egg (keep the other half for brushing the top)

Filling

  • 150g butter (soft, spreadable)
  • 4-5tsp ground cinnamon
  • 120g sugar
  • 1/2 egg for brushing
  • 100g of pearl sugar for decoration (or finely chopped nuts)

Heat the milk to 36-41 degrees and add in a bowl with the yeast, stir until dissolved. Add the butter, sugar, salt, cardamom, egg and enough flour to make the dough combine. You’ll need about 700-800g of flour – but add a little at the time, keeping the mixer on continuously (using the dough hook). Keep the rest of the flour back  for kneading. Work the dough until it almost stops sticking and has a shiny surface – about 6-7 minutes with a mixer, longer by hand (add more flour if you need to). The dough should only just reach the point of not being sticky.

Leave to rise until it’s doubled in size (30-40 mins). Work through with more flour until dough stops sticking and can be shaped, then cut the dough in half and roll out the first piece in a rectangular shape (around 45cm x 35cm). Spread a generous amount of butter evenly, then dust over the cinnamon and sugar. Roll the piece lengthways so you end up with a long, tight thin roll.

Cut the roll in two pieces and place on lined baking trays with plenty of room to rise. To cut the ‘Kanellängd’, use a pair of clean scissors and cut sliced almost all the way through (but not quite) as illustrated in the photos below – and then alternative each piece to the side and press down gently until you have done both pieces.  Leave the cinnamon lengths to rise for 20 minutes.

photo 3-1     photo 4-1      photo 1-1

To make buns with the rest of the the dough:

Repeat the roll-out process, again ending with a rectangular piece of dough around 35 x 45 cm big. Spread the other half of the butter, add cinnamon and sugar and roll tightly lengthways until you have a long roll. Cut the roll into 18 pieces and place each swirl on a lined tray.  Leave to rise for 20 minutes.

Turn the oven to 220 degrees (a bit less if using a fan oven).

Brush all buns gently with remaining egg (you may need a bit more egg) and sprinkle a bit of pearl sugar on each bun. Bake at 220°C for about 8-10 minutes (turn the heat down a bit midway if you feel they’re getting too brown) for the buns – but for the longer rolls, turn the heat down slightly and bake nearer the bottom of the oven for around 20 minutes – take care not to burn them. As this dough contains sugar,t he buns can go dark brown in a split second so keep an eye on them.

As soon as the buns come out of the oven, cool down under a damp, clean tea towel to stop them going dry. If you prefer a stickier surface, brush with a light sugar syrup or even syrup as soon as they are baked.

The buns freeze well (freeze as soon as they have cooled).

photo 2-4

Zesty Prawn Crispbread Pizza

September 14, 2017 | Leave a comment

Prawn Pizza With Zesty Gremolata

A fresh and zingy pizza with plenty of flavour from fresh herbs, lemon zest, a mix of cheeses and fresh prawns.

  • 8 pieces Leksands triangle crispbread (or 1 round)
  • 100ml tomato sauce
  • 1 small onion + butter/oil for frying
  • 50ml ricotta
  • handful finely chopped basil
  • 60g mozzarella
  • Big handful grated cheese (e.g. Vasterbotten)
  • 2 handfuls finely chopped parsley, zest from 1 small lemon, 1 garlic clove grated – mixed to a Gremolata
  • Big handful peeled prawns
  • Seasalt and black pepper

1. Pre-heat oven to 225 degrees celsius.
2. Finely chop onion and fry in a bit of butter until soft – add sugar and let caramelise. Season with salt & pepper.
3. Spread the tomato sauce over the base. Add the onion, basil and ricotta – finish with the mozzarella and grated cheese.

Bake for 10 mins or until the cheese is bubbly and slightly golden. Top with prawns and gremolata – serve immediately.

Enjoy!

—–

Zesty Prawn Pizza

Thanks to our friends at Leksands for the recipe – just mildly adapted for a UK kitchen.

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