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How to hotdog the Scandi way

July 1, 2018 | Leave a comment

 

How to hotdog the Scandinavian way

Look, we have told the world that we’re all about nature. That we forage for weird plants, eat sour milk and lead wholesome, healthy lagom lives. This is, of course, sort of true.

There is another little thing that we Scandinavians ‘do’, though. A lot. We hotdog. Okay, it’s not a verb, but it should be – and we want to hotdog with you, too.

What’s so good about a Scandi Hotdog?

The Sausage

Obviously, the most important part. There are many varieties, but the best ones are rather high meat content (go figure) – brands such as small food producer Per I Viken do the best ones on the market. The style of sausage in Scandinavian is always a wiener type sausage.

In Denmark, they like RED coloured sausages. Why? It started as a bit of a ploy. In the olden days, the hotdog vendors were allowed to sell yesterday’s sausages for pittance to the kids – BUT they had to add red colouring to the water so people know they were getting day-old sausages. Nowadays, this type is the most famous of them all – and no, they are no longer old, but are just made like this for nostalgia reasons.

These are most popular with the Danes… The red thing, it’s a Danish thing.

The Bread

It’s a funny one, but we don’t like long buns. Our buns are short and way too small for the sausage. Yeah, we know – but that’s how we like them. We don’t do long buns. We do good, shorter buns – less bread.

Toppings

We take our topping serious. Go to the bottom of this post for the country specific ‘ways’ – but here is a low-down:

Ketchup

It’s never Heinz. It’s usually a more spiced variety that is made for our hotdogs. Try Idun for a Norway style – or Bähncke for a superb Danish ketchup.

Mustard

Again, Bähncke is a good one – or Idun from Norway, especially for hotdogs. We also have Swedish Slotts mustard, but it is quite strong, so only for the initiated.

Remoulade

Absolutely essential, if you are a Dane. It’s very nice, too. (also goes with chips, fish, beef and anything else, really)

Crispy onions

Delicious on burgers, hotdogs, sandwiches.

Raw onions

The Danes favour this: We like raw.

Pickles

Several options here. Boston Pickles is chopped pickles from Sweden, with a bit of seasoning. Or go for the ever popular Smörgåsgurka from Sweden – a crunchy pickle, quite sweet. Lastly, the Danish Agurkesalat – thinly sliced pickles – perfect on top of those red sausages.

Gurkmajonäs

Chopped pickles (usually smörgåsgurka) mixed with mayonnaise – favoured by Swedes.

The HotDogs

Denmark

A bun, a red sausage, ketchup, mustard, remoulade, raw OR crispy onions. Or both. Pickled Agurkesalat.

Norway

A potato pancake called a lompe, brown pølse sausage, ketchup, mustard.

Sweden

A bun, a brown wienerkorv, ketchup, mustard, Bostongurka or Gurkmajonäs.

Sweden 2: The above, but with a dollop of mashed potato on top. Known as Halv Special (A Half Special). Add another Sausage as it is Hel Special (Full Special)

Sweden 3: Bun, sausage, prawn mayonnaise. Well, yes, it’s a thing. Some add ketchup, too. And yes, some add mash as well. It’s a Swedish thing, we’ve given up questioning this.

Recipe: Korv Stroganoff

February 5, 2015 | Leave a comment

Korv Stroganoff. Ask any Swede and they’ll tell you all about this quick mid-week favourite meal. It’s delicious, even if it isn’t the most photogenic of dishes.

Made with Falukorv, a cooked pork sausage, this dish takes only ten minutes to put together. Falukorv can be bought in our cafe shop or also on Ocado. We highly recommend the brand Per I Viken for the high meat content and great smoked flavour.
www.scandikitchen.co.uk for more.

Serve with rice.

Recipe: Korv Stroganoff
Recipe Type: Dinner
Cuisine: Swedish
Author: Bronte Aurell
Prep time:
Cook time:
Total time:
Serves: 3-4
A quick and easy sausage casserole. A hearty Swedish mid week meal.
Ingredients
  • 1 x 400g falukorv sausage, skin removed and chopped in large chunks.
  • 1 small onion, chopped
  • 1 tbsp tomato purée
  • 1 tin chopped tomatoes
  • 1/2 stock cube diluted in a bit of hot water
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 250ml milk
  • Dollop of double cream (optional)
  • Corn Flour, to thicken
Instructions
  1. In a saucepan, add a bit of oil and cook the onion until soft. Add the sausage and stir. Add tomato purée, chopped tomatoes and stock. Continue cooking for a few minutes, then add the milk and bay leaf. Season with salt and pepper and a bit of sugar, if needed.
  2. Thin a tbsp cornflour with some water and add to the pot to thicken. Add cream at the end, if using.

(subtitute Falukorv for Frankfurters if you can’t get hold of the real Swedish deal).

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