Tag Archives: kanelbullar

Show Us Your Buns

September 28, 2017 | Leave a comment

Cinnamon Bun Day

Use #ShowUsYourBuns on social media so we can find you.

The countdown is on to Sweden’s most favourite day of the year. No, not Kalles Kaviar-day. No, not Snabbmakaronens day… We are, of course, talking about Cinnamon Bun Day (Kanelbullensdag)

Oh, glorious cinnamon bun. Adopted and bastardised by the Americans (that’s when you know you’ve made it in life) who covers them in icing and caramel and we don’t even know (Swedes will never do that). But what we do know is this – a cinnamon bun, whichever way it comes, is lovely. Comforting in its aromatic, plush little curvy self – as delicious with a cup of strong black coffee for breakfast, as with a glass of ice cold cordial on a sunny summer afternoon or split in half and turned into Swedish French toast (oh yes we did!).

Enough talk – on to the buns. This year, as every year – we’d love to see your buns. Big buns, small buns, wonky buns, shiny buns, plain buns or perfect buns. Rolled or knotted or swirled or #failed.

Use #ShowUsYourBuns on social media so we can find you!

There’s only one rule – they have to be homemade, by you alone or as a team effort, and contain cinnamon (OK, that’s two rules). Take a picture and email it to us – we will share the best ones on our instagram and Facebook page. We may pick a lucky winner, too – one lucky person wins a copy of our new book Nørth and a big box of Scandinavian goodies (we’re talking chocolate, liquorice and more).

So, ready steady bake!

Click here for some of our favourite bun recipes – but you don’t have to use one of ours, if you have a favourite recipe or another one you want to try, go for it.

Mail your photos to iloveherring@scandikitchen.co.uk before noon 6th October. Usual competition rules apply.

Cinnamon Bun Recipes

September 27, 2017 | Leave a comment

Our Favourite Cinnamon Bun Recipes

There are as many cinnamon bun recipes as there are parents and grandparents – each claiming theirs to be the ultimate one, producing the softest, most cinnamon-y, comforting little bakes ever. But really – how wrong can you go when it comes to cinnamon buns? We are yet to meet a bun we didn’t enjoy.

Here are some of our favourite recipes – in no particular order.

  1. Classic Cinnamon Buns. Our go to dough for buns – sometimes filled with cinnamon, other times jazzed up with chocolate Always delicious – and easy to do.
  2. Filled Vanilla Buns. 6 different ways to fill a classic bun dough – we particularly love the blueberry version.
  3. Social Cinnamon Bun ‘Wreath’ – a lovely variation on the classic buns in a lovely big sharing version.
  4. Scandi Saffron Buns. Fragrant and aromatic – these are traditionally enjoyed in early December for St. Lucia – but they taste just as good now.
    Cinnamon Twists Bronte Aurell ScandiKitchen

    Phoro credit: Peter Cassidy, for Ryland Peters.

Vanilla buns, six ways.

| 6 Comments

Vanilla buns, six ways

Once you are bored with cinnamon buns, where do you go?

Vanilla is where it’s at. This week, we decided to make a few different versions using the same base dough and basic filling.

There are as many recipes for buns in Sweden as there are people who bake them. We like this one: it’s simple, it’s straightforward and it just works. It forms a great base from which to experiment with your own flavours and fillings. The addition of egg to the dough makes the dough richer than usual. We’ve upped the butter, too – again, you can reduce it but we think it works well with the vanilla.

This recipe makes about 36 Vanilla buns of medium size.

Dough Ingredients

50g fresh yeast

500ml whole milk, luke warm

200g very soft butter (melted also fine)

80g caster sugar

1000 g plain bread flour (or between 800-1000g, depending on the flour)  – we always use Swedish Vetemjol flour for perfect results.

1⁄2 tsp salt

2 tsp ground cardamom

1 egg

 

Filling for Vanilla buns (filling #1, used also in 2-5)

175g butter (soft, spreadable)

4-5 tsp vanilla sugar (we prefer torslefs vanilla sugar)

Seeds from one vanilla pod

150g normal sugar

1 egg for brushing

100-150g of pearl sugar to decorate

 

The dough:

Heat the milk to 36-41 degrees and add in a bowl with the yeast, stir until dissolved. Add the butter, sugar, salt, cardamom, egg and enough flour to make the dough combine. You’ll need about 700-800g of flour – but add a little at the time, keeping the mixer on continuously (using the dough hook). Keep the rest of the flour back for kneading. Work the dough until it almost stops sticking and has a shiny surface – about 6-7 minutes with a mixer, longer by hand (add more flour if you need to). The dough should only just reach the point of not being sticky.

While the dough is rising, whisk butter and vanilla together until smooth and spreadable.

Leave dough to rise until it’s doubled in size (30-40 mins). Work through with more flour until dough stops sticking and can be shaped, then cut the dough in half and roll out the first piece in a rectangular shape (around 45cm x 35cm). Spread a generous amount of the vanilla butter evenly, then roll the piece lengthways so you end up with a long, tight thin roll. Cut 18 slices of the dough and place each swirl onto your baking tray – a good space apart from each other as they will rise again.

Repeat with second half of dough. Leave to rise for 20 minutes.

To make buns with the rest of the the dough:

Turn the oven to 220 degrees (a bit less if using a fan oven).

Brush all buns gently with remaining egg (you may need a bit more egg) and sprinkle a bit of pearl sugar on each bun. Bake at 220°C for about 8-10 minutes (turn the heat down a bit midway if you feel they’re getting too brown) for the buns – but for the longer rolls, turn the heat down slightly and bake nearer the bottom of the oven for around 20 minutes – take care not to burn them. As this dough contains sugar, the buns can go dark brown in a split second, so keep an eye on them.

As soon as the buns come out of the oven, cool down under a damp, clean tea towel to stop them going dry. If you prefer a stickier surface, brush with a light sugar syrup or normal light syrup as soon as they are baked.

The buns freeze well (freeze in plastic bags as soon as they have cooled).

 

Filling option #2

Vanilla and Crème Patisserie

Either make a batch of crème patisserie or simply make a portion of instant vanilla creme – whisk 400ml whole milk with 1 sachet of power, leave to stand for 15 minutes and its ready to use.

Follow recipe as above – but before rolling the buns tight, spread a thin layer of vanilla cream across the dough, then roll and proceed as recipe.

Filling option #3

Blueberrries

With or without the vanilla crème, add fresh or frozen blueberries to the dough before rolling. Simply scatter a handful of blueberries and then roll and slice.

Filling option #4

Tart berries

With out without the vanilla crème, add fresh cloudberries (or frozen) to the dough before rolling. Simply scatter a small amount of berries across, roll and slice.

Filling option #5

Marzipan & Vanilla knots

Roll dough out and in the recipe. Take half a packet of Mandelmasse, marzipan (or similar graded marzipan) and grate about 100g across the dough. (after you have added the vanilla sugar)

Instead of rolling the dough, simply fold it in half lengthways – then cut into 18 strips and make bun ‘knots’. You can check out this video for hints of how to make bun knots – it’s surprisingly easy and it distributes the filling well.

Filling option #6

‘Skoleboller’ – School buns.

Most popular in Norway, these buns are super lovely. For this version, you do not need the vanilla sugar – but you do need the crème patisserie.

Shape the dough into 36 round balls and place on baking trays. Press each ball a bit flat and make an indent in the middle. Add a large teaspoon of vanilla crème patisserie to each bun and leave to rise for about 15 minutes. Bake as directed in recipe.

Once removed from oven, let cool for a bit then pipe out some icing (icing sugar mixed with a teeny bit of warm water) on each bun. Place your desiccated coconut in a soup bowl and dip the bun, icing side down, into the coconut.

 

    Jästbolagets Kronjäst – Fresh Yeast 2 x 50g
    £0.99
    - +
    Torsleff Vaniljesukker – Vanilla Sugar 100g
    £2.99
    - +
    Dansukker Ljus Sirap – Light Syrup 750g
    £2.49
    - +

 

How to make… Cinnamon buns / Kanelbullar

September 26, 2017 | 5 Comments

 

Recipe: Lovely Cinnamon Buns

Kanelbullar, Swedes call them. Skillingsboller or kanelboller in Norway – kanelsnegl a Dane may say. Cinnamon buns. Those delightful soft rolls, perfect for a Fika afternoon cup of coffee or as a snack treat in your lunch box.

This recipe makes about 36 buns of medium size – or 18 buns and two longer ‘Kanellängd’ (longer versions for slicing).

There are as many recipes for cinnamon buns in Sweden as there are people who bake them. We like this one: it’s simple, it’s straightforward and it just works.

Over time, as you get a feel for the dough, you’ll develop your own version that only you can recreate. Try different fillings, spices and nuts.

Ingredients

  • 50g fresh yeast
  • 500ml whole milk, luke warm
  • 150g very soft butter (melted also fine)
  • 85g caster sugar
  • 1000 g plain bread flour (or between 800-1000g, depending on the flour)  – we always use Swedish Vetemjol flour for perfect results.
  • 1⁄2 tsp salt
  • 2 tsp ground cardamom
  • 1/2 egg (keep the other half for brushing the top)

Filling

  • 150g butter (soft, spreadable)
  • 4-5tsp ground cinnamon
  • 120g sugar
  • 1/2 egg for brushing
  • 100g of pearl sugar for decoration (or finely chopped nuts)

Heat the milk to 36-41 degrees and add in a bowl with the yeast, stir until dissolved. Add the butter, sugar, salt, cardamom, egg and enough flour to make the dough combine. You’ll need about 700-800g of flour – but add a little at the time, keeping the mixer on continuously (using the dough hook). Keep the rest of the flour back  for kneading. Work the dough until it almost stops sticking and has a shiny surface – about 6-7 minutes with a mixer, longer by hand (add more flour if you need to). The dough should only just reach the point of not being sticky.

Leave to rise until it’s doubled in size (30-40 mins). Work through with more flour until dough stops sticking and can be shaped, then cut the dough in half and roll out the first piece in a rectangular shape (around 45cm x 35cm). Spread a generous amount of butter evenly, then dust over the cinnamon and sugar. Roll the piece lengthways so you end up with a long, tight thin roll.

Cut the roll in two pieces and place on lined baking trays with plenty of room to rise. To cut the ‘Kanellängd’, use a pair of clean scissors and cut sliced almost all the way through (but not quite) as illustrated in the photos below – and then alternative each piece to the side and press down gently until you have done both pieces.  Leave the cinnamon lengths to rise for 20 minutes.

photo 3-1     photo 4-1      photo 1-1

To make buns with the rest of the the dough:

Repeat the roll-out process, again ending with a rectangular piece of dough around 35 x 45 cm big. Spread the other half of the butter, add cinnamon and sugar and roll tightly lengthways until you have a long roll. Cut the roll into 18 pieces and place each swirl on a lined tray.  Leave to rise for 20 minutes.

Turn the oven to 220 degrees (a bit less if using a fan oven).

Brush all buns gently with remaining egg (you may need a bit more egg) and sprinkle a bit of pearl sugar on each bun. Bake at 220°C for about 8-10 minutes (turn the heat down a bit midway if you feel they’re getting too brown) for the buns – but for the longer rolls, turn the heat down slightly and bake nearer the bottom of the oven for around 20 minutes – take care not to burn them. As this dough contains sugar,t he buns can go dark brown in a split second so keep an eye on them.

As soon as the buns come out of the oven, cool down under a damp, clean tea towel to stop them going dry. If you prefer a stickier surface, brush with a light sugar syrup or even syrup as soon as they are baked.

The buns freeze well (freeze as soon as they have cooled).

photo 2-4

Semla Season 2017 – Everything You Need To Know

January 26, 2017 | Leave a comment

 

Semla Season 2017 – Everything You Need To Know

After Christmas we always feel determined to start a new and healthier life – less chocolate and more spinach, but only until we remember the next big occasion in the Scandi baking calendar; Semla season. Semla is the Swedish answer to pancake-day pancakes, but in our completely unbiased opinion; a million miles better and far too good to only eat once per year.

We started selling these chubby marzipan and cream filled buns of glory in the café a few weeks ago – and as we are now only 1 month away from the big day, it is time to kick off and remind each other what the Semla is all about. We have collated some essential reading (all the important semla-facts), our favourite recipes, and our very own semla product bundles if you want to give them a go at home without the hassle of seeking out the products you need. Ah, you’re welcome. Public semla-service is what we do.

– 12 Things You Need To Know About Semlor –

– Princess Semlor – The 2017 Luxury Semla – Recipe –

Princess Semla Recipe Image

Classic Semlor – Swedish Marzipan Cream Buns – Recipe

Classic Semlor Recipe


 

Fancy doing some baking? Try our kits to get started;

 

Now, promise you try one. Come say Hej and have a coffee and semla with us in our café or make your own, just don’t go without. They are too good to be missed.

Recipe: Cinnamon Bun French Toast

April 29, 2016 | Leave a comment

Imagine it… You have some cinnamon buns left over. Yes, we know, it does not happen often, but it CAN happen. What do you do with those stale things, not good for anything?

The other day, we made french toast. It was indulgent and delicious and quite naughty.

Recipe: Cinnamon Bun French Toast – with homemade vanilla syrup and cardamom yoghurt

Bronte Aurell 2016.

Serves 4

Ingredients

1 x portion of berries – we used raspberries as these are tart and cut through the sweetness of this dish best.

For the syrup (makes a generous portion, more than you need – keep sin fridge for a few weeks)

150g sugar
100ml water
1 scraped out vanilla pod (include the seeds)
salt flakes (optional)
Bring sugar, water and vanilla to the boil and keep gentle boiling for 4-5 minutes on a good heat (take care not to burn). If it’s reducing too quickly, shorten the cooking time or you will end up with a syrup that’s too thick. Take off the heat and, optionally, add salt flakes to taste (it intensifies the flavour of the vanilla).

 

For the yoghurt topping

200g Greek thick set yoghurt

finely ground cardamom, to taste

Stir cardamom with yoghurt, to taste – I like freshly ground cardamom, but leave it plain if you’re not a fan of this strong flavour. You can also make a cardamom syrup (see above) and just add subtle syrup to the yoghurt as this is will be less intense that freshly ground.

For the french toast

4 nice cinnamon buns, sliced open into two pieces each.

(These have to be the more traditional Scandi recipe, yeast based, bread dough buns, not fancy pastry buns)

3 eggs

50g plain flour mixed with a small pinch of baking soda

125ml whole milk

pinch of salt

1/2 tsp ground cinnamon

Butter, for frying.

Whisk the batter together (mix the egg with the flour and soda first, then add the milk and other ingredients bit by bit so it doesn’t lump). Place the bun pieces in a bowl and pour over the batter, ensuring to soak all pieces generously. Leave covered for 10 minutes to soak the bread through.

Heat up some butter in a pan, then fry the pieces of bread until cooked through on both sides. Arrange two pieces (one whole bun) on each serving plate, top with a good dollop of the Greek yoghurt and fresh berries. Pour syrup on to taste (it is very sweet), just before eating.

Nutritional content: Eeeeek. Quite a few laps around the park wearing your fanciest running shoes.

Comfort factor: Top dog.

 

 

Recipe: Pinnekjøtt – Traditional Norwegian Christmas Dinner

December 3, 2015 | Leave a comment

Recipe: Pinnekjøtt

Pinnekjøtt is one of many Christmas dinners eaten in Norway. Traditionally eaten on the west coast of the country, but it is gaining popularity elsewhere too. In many places in the west of Norway, you’ll know it is Christmas when the church bells chime in the afternoon of the 24th and the air has a faint smell of pinnekjøtt cooking. As the sun sets and people move inside and out of the cold, julefreden senker seg.  Christmas peace descends across the country.

Pinnekjøtt is ribs from lamb that have been salted, and sometimes also smoked, to preserve it. For preparation, the meat needs to be soaked in water to remove most of the salt. The result is an intensely delicious and savoury piece of lamb – quite unlike anything else, and very very good (why yes, the writer of this recipe is Norwegian – but strictly objective, of course).

Side dishes vary between families, but a type of swede mash is always present. The natural sweetness of swedes works really well with the meat – finish off your plate with a dollop of lingonberry jam and have a shot of aquavit to drink. Some people also serve plain boilt potatoes and green beans, although this is not part of the traditional meal.

We stock both pinnekjott, lingonberry jam and Norwegian aquavit in our online shop.

Pinnekjøtt is a very easy dish to prepare – just make sure you start it in time.

Serves 5 – allowing approx 400g per person – remember most of the weight is bone.

For the meat:

  • 2 kg Pinnekjøtt
  • Big bowls for soaking the meat in

The day before eating: Place the meat in casseroles or big bowls (or a pyrex dish – anything will do) and cover with plenty of water. Leave in room temperature for approx. 30 hours.

Why do we do this? Pinnekjøtt is meat that has been salted and dried, soaking it ensures it regains its consistency – as well as making it palatable by removing most of the salt. How long this takes depends on the thickness of the meat, as well as the temperature of the water. Tepid water will speed up the process.

On the day of eating, 3 hours before you plan to eat: pour off the water and place the meat to one side.

In your biggest casserole(s), place a metal rack or birch branches in the bottom. Add water until it covers the rack or your branches. Place your meat on top and cover with a lid. Leave to gently steam cook at low heat for approximately 3 hours. Sausage can be added to the casserole for cooking for the last 15-20 minutes; chop into chunks of 2-3 inches to ensure they cook through. It is done when the meat falls easily off the bone.

The traditional side dish to Pinnekjøtt is Rotmos, a mash made from swedes, carrots and potatoes. The amounts of each vary, feel free to adjust to your liking. This is our Mormor Marit’s version.

Serves 5 generously – always very popular though so make a lot!

Swede Mash – Rotmos

  • 1.5 kg Swede, peeled and chopped
  • 3 medium carrots, washed and chopped (peel if you want to)
  • 2 medium potatoes, peeled and chopped
  • 50 ml double cream
  • 50 ml single cream
  • 4 tbsp salted butter
  • 75 ml cooking stock from the pinnekjott
  • Pinch of ground nutmeg (optional)
  • Salt
  • Pepper

Peel your vegetables and chop coarsely into even-sized pieces. Boil until tender in lightly salted water. Leave for 3 minutes to dry, then mash by hand. Add cream and butter and give it a good stir. Add salt and pepper to taste. Add a pinch (not too much – this has a very strong flavour) of ground nutmeg if liked – the slight sweetness goes really well with the salty meat. If you think the mash is too thick, loosen it with some of the pinnekjøtt cooking water.

Serve with pinnekjøtt, lingonberry jam, perhaps some freshly boilt potatoes and a good shot of aquavit.

God jul.

 

Celebrate Bun Week with us 21-27 July 2014

July 17, 2014 | Leave a comment

Next week  (21-27 July 2014) is bun week at the cafe. Here’s the voucher you need in order for you to get your mitts on a free cinnamon bun on the mornings.

Print the voucher or smart phone it – but you do need mention the offer and show voucher when you order.

Please do read the t&c, too.

See you next week.

1407_BunWeekfnl3

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