Tag Archives: food

7 Random Crispy Facts

September 7, 2017 | Leave a comment

7 Random Facts About Crispbread

  1. Crispbread is common across Scandinavia, but especially so in Sweden, followed closely by Norway. 85% of all Swedish households have it at all times.
  2. Crispbread is Sweden’s second largest export – second only to Absolut vodka.
  3. Your average Swedish munches through 5.5 kg of crispbread every year – and crispbread is amongst the most missed food products for Swedes abroad. It may not sound much, but considering an average crispbread weighs about 12 grams, this equates to 458 slices every year. A crispbread a day keeps the doctor away.
  4. What.. IS crispbread? Crispbread is traditionally made with only wholegrain rye, yeast, salt and water, although these days you have a wide range of variety ranging from all-wheat to all nut and seed (to purist, these don’t count). However, when you say crispbread, most people will still think of your classic rye crispbread.
  5. In Scandinavia, crispbread is treated as any other type of bread. It can be topped with almost anything, and is a common part of breakfast, lunch, dinner or snacks in between.
  6. Super versatile, you can have crispbread at every meal. Crushed over a bowl of yoghurt, maybe with some berries, for a naturally low sugar, high fibre and delicious granola for breakfast; topped with smoked salmon and cream cheese for lunch; used as pizza base for dinner (oh yes, crispbread pizza is a thing and it’s delicious. In Sweden you can even buy ready made frozen crispbread pizzas).
  7. In the UK, crispbread is often thought about in one of two ways; 1; as a cracker for cheese or 2; diet food. This saddens our crispy Scandi hearts and tummies. Because; crispbread is absolutely great with cheese, and is definitely much better for you than mass produced wonderbread – but Scandis eat crispbread because it is tasty (and you can top it with anything you like), convenient (it keeps forever) and good for you. You could eat 4 triangles of crispbread for every slice of white bread – and thanks to the high fibre content you will stay fuller for a lot longer. Meaning you may be able to resist that cinnamon bun later. Or not. But that’s ok. Balancing your crispbread with cinnamon buns is what the Swedes would call ‘lagom’.

Now, pass us the crispbread someone. Fancy some? Find our crispbreads here.

Crispbread as base = pizza in 10 minutes.

Packed Lunch – Scandi Style

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Packed Lunch – Scandi Style

Packed lunch comes in many shapes and forms, but one that holds a special place in our Viking hearts is the packed lunch. In Norway especially is this a thing, mostly made up of a few slices of bread – homemade or bread rolls if you’re lucky – with whichever topping your sleep deprived parent managed to dig out of the fridge that morning. Finished with a scribble on the parchment paper that it is all wrapped in – ‘love you lots, MUM’. It never fails to both make your heart smile and your ears go red as you try to quickly unwrap your food and hide the evidence that your mamma loves you and is not afraid to tell your cool friends.

Norsk matpakke

Oh yes, the humble ‘brødskiva’ (also just ‘skive/skiva’: lit. – bread slice – used about any open sandwich) is deeply engrained in Norwegian culture and almost everyone will have fond – and not-so-fond – memories of these. Each sandwich topped with a special, bread slice sized piece of parchment paper (sold in the supermarket, called ‘inbetween paper’ – mellomleggspapir).

Feeling inspired to make your own packed lunch? We thought so. So here follows, our top tips for avoiding sog and 10 classic combos.

Generally for all;

  • A thin layer of butter or mayonnaise will protect the bread from soaking up the moisture of your topping – and will mean other sauces, such as mustard, will not disappear into the bread.
  • Something fresh and crunchy is always a good idea, but remember that vegetables are best packed separately and added when you eat – except lettuce which transports quite well.
  • Separate your sandwiches. Cut pieces of parchment paper to layer between your open sandwiches so they don’t stick together or you get your flavours mixed up (nothing worse than a bit of jam stuck to the underside of your ham sandwich!).

10 Classic Packed Lunch Sandwiches

1. Ham and mustard. Optional extras: Sliced fresh cucumber, cheese.

2. Salami and mayonnaise. Optional extras: Sliced tomato.

3. Cheese and red pepper. We like nutty Jarlsberg or mildly spiced Nøkkelost for this; wrap your pepper in clingfilm separately and add when ready to eat.

4. Cheese with jam – a mature cheese with a sweet jam works. Trust us.

5. Liver pate and cress or pickles (pickles packed separately – cress is fine to pre-pack)

6. Meatballs and beetroot salad. Leftover meatballs (as if..) in slices with creamy beetroot salad –delicious.

7. Smoked salmon. With cream cheese if you’d like – we also really like it with mustard.

8. Brown cheese and raspberry jam. Sweet, yummy and a bit sticky.

9. Hardboiled egg and herring (note – this one works best with a top piece of bread, too). Slices of hardboiled egg with a few very well drained pieces of herring – e.g. mustard herring – on top. Delish!

10. Cheese in a tube. Bacon, ham or prawn cheese – choose your favourite. Nice with crunchy cucumber or red pepper to top.

Matpakke norsk packed lunch

A very sad example.

A few crunchy carrots, slices of raw swede or an apple on the side – you’re good to go. Check out or packed lunch shop here – for breads, condiments, hams, cheeses and more.

 

Crispbread Pizza With Pulled Pork and Guacamole

August 24, 2017 | Leave a comment

Crispbread Pizza With Pulled Pork and Guacamole

Another lovely version of crispbread pizza – this time with pulled pork and avocado cream. Oh yes. Guaranteed to make you popular. We like the original Leksands (blue packaging) for this, but any big round will work as the toppings are so flavoursome.

  • 1 round of Leksands crispbread
  • 100ml tomato sauce
  • 75g pulled pork (leftovers or ready bought)
  • 1 tomato
  • 60g mozzarella
  • 2 handfuls grated Vasterbotten– (or Cheddar)
  • 1/2 red onion, thinly sliced
  • 1 lime
  • 1 avocado
  • Fresh chili, finely chopped
  • Fresh coriander, finely chopped
  • Sea salt & freshly ground pepper

1. Pre-heat oven to 225 degrees celsius.
2. Prep the pickled onion; place thinly sliced onion in a bowl and cover with lime juice, squeezing it together with a spoon or your hand.
3. Spread the tomato sauce over the base. Add the sliced fresh tomato and chunks of pulled pork. Season with salt and pepper, then finish with the cheese.

Bake for approximately 10 minutes until the cheese is bubbly and slightly golden. Meanwhile, mash the avocado with the chili, coriander and lime juice – serve with a dollop of guacamole.

Enjoy!

—–

Thanks to our friends at Leksands for the recipe – just mildly adapted for a UK kitchen.

Crispbread Pizza With Chicken

August 22, 2017 | Leave a comment

Crispbread Pizza With Chicken

We are big fans of using crispbread as a quick and easy pizza base. By using a round of Leksands as your base you can have pizza in 12 minutes – the mild rye flavour complements these toppings really well.

  • 1 round of Leksands crispbread
  • 100ml tomato sauce
  • 3 slices roast chicken
  • 1 small onion, chopped – plus butter or oil for frying
  • clove of garlic
  • Pinch of sugar
  • 60g mozzarella
  • Good handful grated cheddar (or try it with Vasterbotten)
  • 2 tbsp creme fraiche, 1/2 tsp Dijon mustard and a squeeze of lemon – stirred together
  • Sea salt & freshly ground pepper

1. Pre-heat oven to 225 degrees celsius.
2. Finely chop onion and fry in  a bit of butter until soft – add a pinch of sugar and the garlic and let caramelise. Season with salt & pepper.
3. Spread the tomato sauce over the base. Add the onion mixture, sliced fresh tomato, chicken chunks and apple – finish with the cheese.

Bake for approximately 10 minutes until the cheese is bubbly and slightly golden. Scatter with fresh rocket and serve with the sauce.

Enjoy!

—–

Chicken Crispbread Pizza

Thanks to our friends at Leksands for the recipe – just mildly adapted for a UK kitchen.

How to hotdog the Scandinavian way

March 30, 2017 | Leave a comment

This weekend 31st March – 2nd April 2017 we are serving Swedish, Danish and Norwegian hotdogs. Or just tell us how you like it.

ALL WEEKEND – only £2 each (usual price £3). 

Enjoy with a cold Tuborg beer for just £5

How to hotdog the Scandi way

Look, we have told the world that we’re all about nature. That we forage for weird plants, eat sour milk and lead wholesome, healthy lagom lives. This is, of course, sort of true.

Except on weekends.

Come Friday night – also known as Fredagsmys / Fredagshygge, all bets are off and we can eat crisps and other treats. On Saturday, we eat sweets. By Sunday, we go back to being wholesome again.

There is another little thing that we Scandinavians ‘do’, though. A lot. We hotdog. Okay, it’s not a verb, but it should be – and we want to hotdog with you, too.

What’s so good about a Scandi Hotdog? The ones you get in IKEA (the 50p ones – where you only have to spend £422 on bookshelves and candles before you get one) are not quite a true representatives of a true Scandi Hotdog. No, no.

The Sausage

Obviously, the most important part. There are many varieties, but the best ones are rather high meat content (go figure) – brands such as small food producer Per I Viken do the best ones on the market. The style of sausage in Scandinavian is always a wiener type sausage.

In Denmark, they like RED coloured sausages. Why? It started as a bit of a ploy. In the olden days, the hotdog vendors were allowed to sell yesterday’s sausages for pittance to the kids – BUT they had to add red colouring to the water so people know they were getting old sausages. Nowadays, this type is the most famous of them all – and no, they are no longer old, but are just made like this.

Only the Danes like these. They are delicious, but don’t try to get a Swede to pick one –the red thing, it’s a Danish thing.

The Bread

It’s a funny one, but we don’t like long buns. Our buns are short and way too small for the sausage. Yeah, we know – but that’s how we like them. We don’t do long buns. We do good, shorter buns.

Toppings

We take our topping serious. Go to the bottom of this post for the country specific ‘ways’ – but here is a low-down:

Ketchup

It’s never Heinz. It’s usually a more spiced variety that is made for our hotdogs. Try Idun for a Norway style – or Bähncke for a superb Danish ketchup.

Mustard

Again, Bähncke is a good one – or Idun from Norway, especially for hotdogs. We also have Swedish Slotts mustard, but it is quite strong, so only for the initiated.

Remoulade

Essential, if you are a Dane. It’s very nice, too.

Crispy onions

Delicious on burgers, hotdogs, sandwiches.

Raw onions

The Danes favour this. We like raw.

Pickles

Several options here. Boston Pickles is chopped pickles from Sweden, with a bit of seasoning. Or go for the ever popular Smörgåsgurka from Sweden – a crunchy pickle, quite sweet. Lastly, the Danish Agurkesalat – thinly sliced pickles – perfect on top of those red sausages.

Gurkmajonäs

Chopped pickles (usually smörgåsgurka) mixed with mayonnaise – favoured by Swedes.

The HotDogs

Denmark

A bun, a red sausage, ketchup, mustard, remoulade, raw OR crispy onions. Or both. Pickled Agurkesalat.

Norway

A potato pancake called a lompe, brown pølse sausage, ketchup, mustard.

Sweden

A bun, a brown wienerkorv, ketchup, mustard, Bostongurka or Gurkmajonäs.

Sweden 2: The above, but with a dollop of mashed potato on top. Known as Halv Special (A Half Special). Add another Sausage as it is Hel Special (Full Special)

Sweden 3: Bun, sausage, prawn mayonnaise. Well, yes, it’s a thing. Some add ketchup, too. And yes, some add mash as well. It’s a Swedish thing.

This weekend 31st March – 2nd April 2017 we are serving Swedish, Danish and Norwegian hotdogs. Or just tell us how you like it.

ALL WEEKEND – only £2 each (usual price £3). 

Enjoy with a cold Tuborg beer for just £5

Foodie habits that Scandies don’t realise are… weird

January 8, 2017 | Leave a comment

 

So, we have our little food quirks. Aside from all the really weird stuff like fermented herring and smoked sheep’s head, we have little habits that other nations sometimes find a little, well, a little peculiar….

Food in tubes.

Especially cod roe, that is a huge favourite among Swedes and Norwegians. For breakfast. With boiled egg.

KallesKaviar

Remoulade with everything.

Danes especially love remoulade, a type of curried pickle mayonnaise sort of thing. Enjoy it with chips (nope, not ketchup), breaded fish, roast beef, on pate, on meatballs, on everything they can think of, actually.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Tacos on Fridays

Scandinvians LOVE Tacos. It’s a Friday thing. For Swedes and Norwegians, it’s every Friday, too.

Screen Shot 2017-01-08 at 13.11.38

Everything is referred to as Tacos, it’s so much easier than learning your burrito from your enchilada from your fajita. Just call it all Tacos. All of it. Even the nachos are called Tacos on Friday evenings. Also, must be served with chopped cucumber pieces (a combination somewhat strange to Mexico).

In Sweden, go one better and have Taco Pie.

It’s a Taco Quiche. Well done, Sweden.  Photo: Ica, Sweden

TAcoPaj (ica sweden)

Jam and cheese.

For breakfast, enjoy a nice treat of bread, cheese and a dollop of strawberry jam.

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Liquorice.

It’s not a silly fad: It is our life. Live with it. And we will ALWAYS try to make you taste it, only to find that you will never understand our love of salty, tar-like ‘sweets’.

SONY DSC

Gammel Dansk

This is Danes only. A 38% alcohol drink, made from a secret blend of 29 herbs. Danes like to drink this in shots. In the morning. With breakfast. Older Danes have a saying: ‘One shot for each leg’.

Screen Shot 2017-01-08 at 13.05.16

While in Norway

they have freshly baked waffles. Topped with brown goats cheese – and jam.

Photo: Matprat.

MATPRAT Vafler brunost

Dip your chip

All our crisps (potato chips ) MUST be dipped in a sour cream dip dressing, usually named something exotic such as ‘holiday dip’. Every single crisp must be dipped.

dipmix

Want to know something else?

In Denmark, sometimes, crisps are served with the main meal. On the plate. Add gravy. Yes, it’s a real thing (but mainly for Christmas and Grandma’s birthday).

franke kartofler

Spaghetti & Ketchup for dinner

Yes, even grown ups at times. We LOVE it. We need nothing more.

Screen Shot 2017-01-08 at 17.05.22

Pickled herring.

Nope, we really don’t think it is weird to eat pickled herring on crispbread or rye bread.

Senapsill-0019_original

Ah, and the delicious Kebab Pizza.

Pizza – topped with shavings of kebab meat – and dressing.

kebabpizza

And in Sweden, the hotdogs are often topped with prawn mayonnaise. AND ketchup and mustard.

Screen Shot 2017-01-08 at 13.18.52

When in Norway, they have waffle hotdogs, too. Yes they do.

Screen Shot 2017-01-08 at 13.59.41

Photo – coop.no

And in Sweden, black pudding

– with jam. Lingonberry jam. It’s a thing.

blodpudding

We all love a bit of cold rice pudding. In Norway and Sweden topped with orange segments (especially those from a tin) – and cherry sauce in Denmark. We eat this for Christmas.

Screen Shot 2017-01-08 at 13.24.19

Back in Sweden, people eat Sandwich Cakes.

Bread, mayo, filling of choice, bread, mayo, more filling, decorate with every shred of your imagination. Set. Slice. You’re the hero.

smorgastarta

We eat so much pork liverpate

We buy it in half kilo packages. Huge. And then we add so much pickled cucumber on it you can’t taste the pate (get some here).

leverpostej

Flying Jacob

The Swedish Dish that people are often not quite sure is actually real – but it is: Chicken baked with cream, curry, chilli ketchup, bananas… Then topped with bacon bits and peanuts. Serve with rice.

flying jacob

Open sandwiches don’t seem to strange now, eh?

 

New Finnish Range – Product Sneak Peek

September 28, 2016 | Leave a comment

ScandiKitchen Finnish Range – Coming Soon..

We’re counting down the days to the arrival of our brand new Finnish range – have a look at what’s coming and let us know what you think!


Want to win £20 to spend in our online shop?

Simply choose your three favourite product from below, and send in an email to: finland@scandikitchen.co.uk before 23.59 Sunday 2nd of October. Enthusiastic and excited emails are highly encouraged and appreciated, although the winners will  be picked at random.

Want to win £20 to spend in our online shop?

Simply choose your three favourite product from above, and send in an email to: finland@scandikitchen.co.uk before 23.59 Sunday 2nd of October. Enthusiastic and excited emails are highly encouraged and appreciated, although the winners will  be picked at random.

Like this post? Know someone you think will be excited about any of these? Share it on Facebook to spread the Finland-love – button below.

Swedish Crayfish Party – How To Celebrate – Roxanne’s Way

August 4, 2016 | Leave a comment

Swedish Crayfish Party – How I Celebrate

Swedes all over Love their crayfish party and there are many ways to host this type of party, and this week, our People’s Hero Roxanne shares her way of celebrating through a few simple questions.

Where do we usually find you during the crayfish festivities and what are the essentials?

This is a tradition I usually celebrate back home in Sweden. You would probably find me at my friend’s house sitting in their garden (warning the neighbors beforehand about the loud singing that might occur throughout the night)

One of the essentials – except for the actual crayfish – is of course the aquavit (snaps). And it is law amongst my friends to sing a ‘snapsvisa’ called ‘helan går’ (everything goes) before we take a shot of Skåne aquavit.

crayfish-party garlandWhat do you eat at the crayfish party?

Crayfish of course –a lot of them. We usually also have a lot of other sea food such as prawns as everyone don’t like crayfish. To our crayfishes we serve a variety of other food that goes really well with the sea food.

We always have Vasterbotten quiche, different types of bread (crispbread of course), cheese with caraway or with cloves and many different styles of nibbles (sour cream and onion crisps being my favourite to snack on throughout the night).

crayfiah

 

Is there any essential that is a must have?

Snapsglas! (shot glasses) how would you drink all the snaps otherwise?

What is your advice for the crayfish rookies that want to host the festivities?

Well – don’t go dressed as you were going to meet the queen – when eating crayfish you have to be ready for the mess.

 

To read more about crayfish parties and how you could host one – click here. 

To visit our crayfish shop click here. 

 

Swedish Midsummer – How To Celebrate – Therese’s Way

June 9, 2016 | Leave a comment

Swedish Midsummer – How I Celebrate

Swedes all over Love midsummer (you might have seen Alicia Vikander on Jimmy Fallon..? If not, we’ve included the clip for you below). There are many ways to celebrate, and this week, our Thérèse shares her way of celebrating. Over to you, T!

” Hej! I am Thérèse and I’m located in Stockhome. I recently moved to London from Sweden. It doesn’t matter where I am this time of year – I always celebrate midsummer.

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Photo credit: Conny Fridh/imagebank.sweden.se

Midsummer for me is all about having fun, celebrating with friends and eat a lot of food. I often celebrate the holiday on the actual midsummer eve (this year – 24th June) ‘midsommarafton’ – but it really depends on when my friends are free to celebrate.

Growing up I spent most of my summers in the summerhouse in the west of Sweden, and we would usually go to the closest local midsummer event to celebrate there. These days the place of the celebration varies – either in a park or at someone’s house – usually the friend with the best garden. One thing remains the same wherever though – flower garlands in my hair. It’s essential.

Making_midsummer_flower_garlands-06

 

What do we eat at midsummer?

Food is of course very important during midsummer. My friends and I often prepare a buffet together. We cook most of the food ourselves but we usually buy some things, like nibbles, ready made. That way we can nibble whilst we cook and take our time with it. We usually get snacks like sour cream and onion crisps, dill crisps, cheese corn snacks and some beer to drink.

The buffet has certain ‘rules’ to it – the first round is all about herring and bread. Having a good range of herring is essential. My favourites have always been the mustard herring, onion herring and the herring in roe, but a good midsummer spread usually includes even more – such as dill herring or herring in curry (You can browse our range of herring here).

We also have a variety of crispbread, rye bread and polar bread – as well as new potatoes boiled in a lot of dill. We eat the potatoes sliced up on your bread of choice with a bit of herring. With this we also serve cured or smoked salmon; seafood salad is also always included in our buffet. I like to top my salmon sandwiches with dill and mustard sauce.

In addition to the herring and fish, we often have a barbecue with different meats, spicy sausages and new-potato salad and chips with Vasterbotten cheese – lovely with a fresh dip! To drink we have lagers (beer) and aquavit. Of course, in true Swedish fashion, we have to sing some drinking songs.

Finally we’ll have a lovely strawberry cake (we have a nice recipe – click through to view) and perhaps some of our favourite sweets and chocolates. If we feel really merry we might search for a midsummer pole to do some embarrassing little frog dancing around.”

Don’t know what Frog Dancing  is? Have a look below, where the Oscar winning Swedish actress Alicia Vikander shows Jimmy Fallon how it’s done. Happy Midsummer all!

 

To read more about Swedish midsummer – click here.

To visit our Midsummer Shop for all the foods and snacks you need, click here.

 

Open Sandwiches – Video

January 20, 2016 | Leave a comment

Watch Bronte Aurell demonstrate some of her favourite open sandwiches from the ScandiKitchen Cookbook – from smoked salmon to roast beef, egg and prawn, smoked mackarel and fennel and apple.

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