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How to be more Finnish

October 18, 2018 | Leave a comment

How to be more Finnish

Okay, so, after a long time, we finally wrote the Finnish one (Find the Danish, Swedish and Norwegian ones here).

Actually, our Nanja wrote it and she is very Finnish… so blame her if it’s all wrong. You’ll find her in the store down the road, queuing for free buckets.

Add your own ‘How to be more Finnish’ in comments below.

Mind the personal space. Finns like to keep a good 2 metre gap between them and the next person. Try and get closer, you may quickly notice Finns back away. Respect the space. Kiitos!

Do not talk to strangers. While the general rule in Finland is to avoid human interaction entirely where possible, this especially applies to actual strangers. Never sit next to a stranger on a bus as this might result to having to speak to them (A Finn will probably miss his stop on purpose just to avoid the conversation).

Do not make eye contact. If you have to talk to a stranger, at least make sure not to make eye contact. Look down at your shoes when speaking to someone. If you are particularly extroverted, you may look at the other person’s shoes when speaking to them.

Remember that Finns are better than Swedes at everything. Especially ice hockey (Blame the Russians for everything else)

Take your shoes off when entering a house. Every Finnish home has a special little room to leave your shoes in and you will not be let in the house if you leave your shoes on.

Drink a lot of coffee, more than any other person on this planet. Drink the most. You need all the caffeine to avoid people. Drink it without milk and sugar. Shake your head at people who take milk in their coffee.

Give up phrases such as please and thank you. Instead of saying ‘Could I have the butter, please’ you can just go with ‘butter’.

Pick and mix is for Saturdays. Go to the old school DVD rental places to buy it as they have the best selection (even if they no longer have any DVDs and it feels a bit sad. Still, pick’n’mix)!

Always be punctual. Finns are never, ever late. Never. EVER.

Listen to heavy metal music. Even if you’re like, 6 years old. There is a heavy metal band for every age group in Finland.


 Please note this is a Swede trying to imitate a Finnish drunk person. It is not at all funny (by the way, Sweden is rubbish at Ice hockey).

Only drink alcohol if you intend to get drunk. Why else would you do it?

 

 

 

 

 

Get passionate about free buckets. Occasionally big Finnish companies might offer free buckets with purchases – and during occasions like this you can spot big queues outside the stores. Finns really love free buckets. It’s a thing in Finland. Buckets. Free buckets.

Zero degrees outside is acceptable t-shirt weather. After all, the Finnish summer only lasts for a day, so every opportunity wasted it a possible summer gone.

Have a sauna at least once a week. In the sauna that is already built in to your own house, social club or the local Burger King. You must be naked in a sauna and observe Sauna rules at all times. Sauna is sacred time.

Have sisu. Finns have a lot of sisu and it’s defined as being a mix of bravery, stubbornness, determination and resilience. Sisu means get up and stop whining when you have been beaten to the ground. Get up, stop whining and GET IT DONE.

Only with good sisu will you actually survive a winter in Finland.

Always use a cheese slicer. Never, ever a knife. NEVER.

Partake in sports such as Swamp Soccer, Wife Carrying, Ant Nest Sitting competitions and more. All in a day of fun for Finns (note: always beat Sweden, no matter what sport).

Treat everyone as an equal. Even the Finnish president has to clear his driveway of snow by himself.

The Nordic Law of Jante applies to Finns too. Never accepts compliments and do not be visibly proud of your achievements. Fit in with the group and do not challenge it.

Get extremely overly excited when Finland is mentioned internationally, for any reason, especially positive ones.

Only cross the road when the light is green – even if there’s no cars around. Nobody jay-walks.

Make all foreigners try really salty liquorice. Because this is where the fun in life can really be found.

Don’t forget to comment. Kippis!

The Crayfish Season

July 15, 2018 | Leave a comment

Crayfish Season

Picture this: a little, red wooden house set by a calm, blue lake that sparkles silver from the rays of the summer sun. Rolling green hills and never ending meadows full of wild flowers and berries, surrounding everything and everyone on pure postcard bliss.  Welcome to the picture perfect Swedish late summer evening and welcome to the Crayfish Season: it’s time for Kräftskiva (or, if you’d rather: a somewhat messy event involving lots of crustaceans and hard liquor).

Every year in August, Finnish and Swedish people all over the world get excited by the start of the crayfish season. The timing of the season is founded in local law which dictates that Scandinavian freshwater crayfish must only be fished in late summer and early autumn. Although in this time of easy imports where crayfish is available all year round, tradition still holds strong and the season is very much part of the Swedish and Finnish calendar of events, thirdly only to Midsummer and Eurovision.

Crayfish was first mentioned by Aristotle back in the really old days but as a delicacy its big break came in the 1800’s when Monsieur Napoleon developed a thing for the ‘écrevisses’ and got the whole of France hooked as a result. Initially crayfish were plentiful in rivers and lakes all across central and northern Europe, but as this gastronomic trend spread across the continent, the crayfish stock was in steep decline. A lethal pest almost wiped out the entire stock in the early 1900’s and local laws were quickly introduced to limit the availability of the delicacy thus saving it from extinction.

Today most crayfish in the world is farmed, although the ultimate delicacy for a crayfish party is still locally sourced Swedish or Finnish beauties. These are seriously pricey, though, so most people settle for the almost-just-as-good imported, cooked and quickly frozen type, usually imported from China, Turkey or other fancy far-away places. Alternatively, if you happen to have your own Swedish lake handy, you can opt for some night time fishing with wire traps – these buggers are nocturnal and will do much to avoid your dinner plate.

The difference between crayfish you buy at your local fishmonger outside Sweden is that the Scandinavian kind is cooked in a brine sauce of dill, then some dill and a bit more dill thrown in for good measure. Crayfish is, like lobster, cooked alive (sorry if you are vegetarian and reading this) which is why most people who do not have access to live crustaceans tend to buy the frozen kind – these have been cooked to the Scandinavian recipe already and all you need to do is remove from freezer and wait a while.

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So, how do you go about celebrating the humble crayfish, Scandinavian style? A traditional Kräftskiva, or Rapujuhlat as it is called in Finland, typically starts late afternoon or early evening. A long table, which is usually outside in the garden or park, is decorated with colourful tablecloths; there are silly special crayfish party hats and bibs available for all guests to wear (surprisingly, with pictures of crayfish on them), lanterns depicting the Man in the Moon as well as festive crayfish cut-out garlands.

The crayfish is served cold in a big bowl on the table, lovingly decorated with some more dill. Eating crayfish is a long process: a crayfish party can last well into the night, so mountains of toasted, white bread is also served to ensure the aquavit is soaked up along the way. It’s always preferable that the guests don’t end up too wobbly too quick and get ideas about skinny dipping and sing-songs before time.

Blocks of the infamous Västerbotten cheese (a 12 months aged Swedish cheese from the Västerbotten area, not unlike parmesan in consistency but without the smell of feet) is also served. Along with this is an abundance of cold beers and, of course, no Scandinavian party is complete without the presence of the old Aquavit – a grain based, flavoured strong liquor that is served ice cold.  Some people practice “one shot for every claw” but as you’ll eat your way through a good dozen crayfish during the course of an evening, pacing yourself below this is recommended – at least until someone starts singing.  Singing is a good sign that you may as well just give in and join the fun – and there’s no drinking without any singing, according to Swedish law (nor is there any singing without drinking, or any time for silence, according to most local Crayfishionados).  A few of those aquavit and you’ll automatically be able to sing all the songs in fluent Swedish.

Crayfish is eaten with the hands and it is a lovely, messy affair.  If you are invited to one of these special parties during the season, do remember that it is absolutely a requirement to slurp noisily as you suck up the dill juices from the claws and belly of the “kräft” as well – a sign that you are truly initiated into this wonderful tradition.  Before you know it, all the people around the table will be your best friends, you’ll be planning next year’s holidays with Björn and Agneta in Uppsala and maybe even having a cheeky footsie session with Lars under the table.  Suddenly, after you’ve thrown in a swarm of evil mosquitoes, that little red house by the lake doesn’t feel that far away after all.

Crayfish Essentials

    Pandalus Kräftor – Crayfish in Dill Brine 1kg
    £15.99
    Nøgne Ø Imperial Brown Ale 330ml
    £5.99
    Kräfthattar – Crayfish Party Hats (4 pack) – Blue
    £2.59
    Ærø Walnut Beer Organic 6%
    £4.99
    Ærø IPA Beer Organic 5%
    £4.99
    Norrmejerier Vasterbottensost – Gourmet Piece 165g
    Rated 5.00 out of 5
    £4.99
    ScandiKitchen: Summer – Bronte Aurell
    Rated 5.00 out of 5
    £16.99
    Tine Nøkkelost – Cheese w/ Cumin & Cloves 600g
    £11.99
    Nils Oscar God Lager – Beer – CASE of 20
    £39.99
    Nøgne Ø Imperial Stout – 9% ABV – CASE of 12 x 330ml
    £69.99
    Nogne O IPA Beer 7.5% ABV – CASE of 12
    £69.99
    Nøgne Ø Imperial Brown Ale – 7.5% ABV – CASE of 12 x 330ml
    £69.99
    Ærø Organic IPA Beer – CASE of 15
    £72.99
    Ærø Organic Walnut Beer – CASE of 15
    £72.99
    Leksands Fäbodknäcke Surdeg – Sourdough Crispbread 730g
    £5.99
    ScandiKitchen Gravlaxsås – Dill & Mustard Sauce 200g (Rævesovs)
    £2.89
    Korshags Gravlax – Cured Salmon 100g
    £3.99
    Hedlund Kraftgirland – Crayfish Garland 4m
    £3.59
    Gäsene Hushallsost – Mild Cheese c.1.1kg
    £10.29
    Saturnus Skargardssnapsar 36.2% – Mini Aquavit Selection 10x50ml
    £25.49
    Norrmejerier Västerbottensost – Mature Cheese 33% 450g
    £9.99
    ScandiKitchen Rödbetssallad – Beetroot Salad 200g (Rødbedesalat)
    Rated 5.00 out of 5
    £1.99
    Aalborg Dild Aquavit 38% – Dill Aquavit 700ml
    £34.49
    Arla Gräddfil – Sour Cream 300ml
    £1.89
    Hedlund Kräftservietter – Crayfish Party Napkins (20 pack)
    £3.09
    Leksands Normalgraddat – Rye Crispbread 830g
    £5.59
    Leksands Brungraddat – Brown Baked Crispbread 830g
    £5.59
    Brondums Snaps 40% – Aquavit 700ml
    £29.99

Scandi Ice Creams – Now Available

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The ice creams we remember from our childhoods plus some new favourites! Do you dare trying the salty liquorice one?

We’ve got everything from Piggelin to Københavner – to Dumle, Daim and more.

 

Available in store now – pop by and get yours before they’re gone!

13 Useful Scandinavian Insults

April 27, 2018 | Leave a comment

13 brilliant Scandinavian insults

Feeling a bit annoyed, need to let some steam off? How about you do so with these rather wonderful Scandinavian insults – many of which are under used thanks to the influx of English – but they sound oh so lovely. These are just a handful from a loooong list, we had to stop somewhere. Give it a go and tell us if there are any of these you use, or any we have missed – like the wonderful ‘Suppegjøk’ (Norwegian) . Lit. Soup cuckoo – Someone ditsy and silly. ‘You’ve lost your wallet AGAIN? You soup cuckoo!’

    1. Klossmajor (Danish, Norwegian) – Lit. Brick major – Someone super clumsy.
      klossmajor
    2. Juksemaker pipelort (Norwegian) – Lit. Cheat maker pipe poo – Someone who cheats. The second half usually only added on by children.
    3. Snuskhummer (Swedish) – Lit. dirty lobster – used about dirty (old?) men staring at girls.
      snuskhummer
    4. Snoronga (Swedish, has Danish and Norwegian equivalents) – Lit. Snot child – someone snotty and spoilt; a brat.
      Snoronga
    5. Klaptorsk (Danish) – Lit. Clapping cod – Someone doing something very stupid; much like a cod attempting to clap .
      Klaptorsk
    6. Vatnisse (Danish, Norwegian) – Lit. cotton gnome – someone silly (with cottonwool for brains, perhaps). EDIT: also used about person that never stands up for anything or anyone, but always gives in (thank you Fredd!)
    7. Narhat (Danish) – Lit. Fool’s hat – someone so stupid they’re not even worthy being called a fool, just the fool’s hat.
      Narhat
    8. Skitstövel (Swedish) – Lit. Shit boot – someone full of shit.
      Skitstovel
    9. Kronidiot (Norwegian) – Lit. Crown idiot – As stupid as you can get. The leader of the idiots.
      kronidiot
    10. Korkad (Swedish) – Lit. Corked – Someone stupid.
      korkad
    11. Bytting (Norwegian) – Lit. Swapee (ie. Being swapped) – someone so stupid or evil you think they have been swapped for someone from the underworld.
      bytting
    12. Dumbom (Swedish) – Lit. Stupid barrier – Barriers are, in general, stupid because they are blocking the way, right? So a stupid-barrier is an insult you do not want thrown after you.
      dumbom barrier
    13. Mehe (Norwegian) – Lit. from Medhenger, meaning ‘with-hanger’ – someone who just follows and can’t think for themselves.Followers Mehe

 

 

Our favourite Finnish facts

December 5, 2017 | Leave a comment

 

Our favourite Finnish facts

 

We gathered some of our most favourite Finnish facts for you. Just because we love Finland.

    1. In Finland, you don’t dip your toe to test the water. Instead, you test the ice with a stick (kokeilla kepillä jäätä)
    2. The Finns don’t use a “computer”… they have a “knowledge machine” (Tietokone).
    3. There is a word in Finnish for ‘I wonder if I should run around aimlessly’ – it is “juoksentelisinkohan?”
    4. The Finns have a tradition of Ants Nest Sitting Competition – a fun thing to do with friends. You take down your pants, sit down on an ants nest – first person up, loses
    5. In Finnish, the word for dragon is ‘salmon snake’ (Lohikäärme)
    6. Finland has the most Northern Vinyard – it is called Olkiluoto Nuclear Power Plant in Finland (61°14′N; 21°26′E) (yes, nuclear) and yields around 850kg of grapes annually.
    7. Finland has won Eurovision once – it was with Lordi’s Hard rock Hallelujah
    8. As much as 86% of Finland is covered with forests.
    9. The Finnish place name of Paskalomavaara means ‘Shitvacationdanger’ if you translate it literally.
    10. Instead of describing someone as dumb in Finnish, someone might just say “Well, it’s dark in the attic” (on vintti pimeana)
    11. There are no public payphones in Finland.
    12. The Finnish word kalsarikännit means to “stay in, wearing your underwear, drinking beer, with no intention of going out”.
    13. A hangover in Finnish is known as a ‘Krapula’
    14. In Finland, your speeding fine is calculated based on your income.
    15. Candyfloss in Finnish is “hattara”, meaning: ‘small cloud’.
    16. In 2016, Finland was the safest country on earth (according to the World Economic Forum (WEF). The UK was no 63 on the same list).
    17. Finland has 187,888 lakes that are larger than 500 m²
    18. The Finns don’t say something “vanished into thin air” instead the Finns say it “disappeared like a fart in Sahara” (Kadota kuin pieru Saharaan).
    19. The Finnish the word ‘pilkunnussija’ is someone who is pedant and particular about tiny details – and it translates literally to ‘comma fucker’.
    20. There are over 3million saunas in Finland – and only 5m people. There is even a Burger King with a Sauna in it.
    21. The Finnish psyche can be summed up in one brilliant word: Sisu. When the going gets tough, the tough get ‘sisu’. It’s that thing inside that makes you get back up and carry on. Stop whining, pick yourself up and carry on – and finish what you started. Sisu.
    22. Finland is most heavy metal loving nation in the world with 53.5 metal bands per 100,000 people.
    23. Finnish people drink the most coffee in the world (12kg per person per year).
    24. The Sami in Finland have a measure for 7km, it’s called Poronkusema and it’s the distance a reindeer can travel before needing a pee. “Peter lives 2 poronkusema away”
    25. The Moomin trolls come from Finland.
    26. If a Finnish person tell you that it is like perfume on a meatball, he simply means to tell you it doesn’t fit (like the English ‘square peg in a round hole – but about meatballs…) (sopia kuin hajuvesi lihapulliin)
    27. In Finnish, if you say tapaan sinut it means: “I’ll meet you.” If you say tapan sinut it menas “I’ll kill you.” Do NOT get these two mixed up.
    28. Finland is ranked the most literate nation in the world
    29. And our favourite Finnish idiom: Hänellä ei ole kaikki muumit laaksossa – He doesn’t have all trolls in the valley.

We love random facts. Follow us on Facebook with the tag #BeNordic for your daily dose.

How to Enjoy Autumn like a Scandi

October 18, 2017 | Leave a comment

How to Autumn like a Scandi

Or what we think about when it is biting cold, rainy and dark. It is the little things. From the smell of your coffee in the morning, to the fact that you can wear your old bright knitted socks that grandma made and perhaps spend some hours in the kitchen baking with cinnamon. Let’s go on…

  1. Autumn is the perfect time to go full fledged HYGGE. Candles EVERYWHERE.
  2. We can finally wear all the knitted socks we own…

  3. …and our (Christmas) jumpers
  4. We can eat lovely traditional food such as Fårikål (lit. Mutton in cabbage – Norway’s national dish; mutton or lamb stewed with cabbage and peppercorns and not much else) and Korv Stroganoff (the Swedish sausage version of the stew named after a 19th century Russian count).
  5. ..and cover everything in cinnamon. Buns, apple cakes, porridge, crispbread..yum! 
    cinnamon buns - cinnamon rolls - skillingsboller
  6. We can go hiking like a Norwegian in bright, weatherproof jackets, with a Kvikk Lunsj to match. They taste best when enjoyed outside in the fresh air, you know (and on the inside, contains the Norwegian rules of the mountain to help you stay safe. If you can read Norwegian, that is).

  7. We can FINALLY wear our Sydvests (sou’westerns).

  8. And we finally don’t have to defend our multiple-cups-of-coffee-by-9am habit – the colder dark mornings being the perfect excuse.  
  9. Fredagsmys is back on the agenda; It is, year round – but in summer sometimes UTEPILS takes precedent (Utepils = the Norwegian concept of enjoying a beer outside whenever there is a sliver of sunshine and warmth in the air (read; warmer than 4 degrees)

    Fredagsmys fredagskos 
  10. And, some say it is a bit early, but it still makes us happy to start planning our Glögg parties…

  11. …and our gingerbread baking competitions..

    Just your casual Scandi gingerbread house production.

    (We know, we KNOW! The last two are strictly for The season that shall not yet be named. But when autumn is grey, dark and cold it is nice to let yourself be just a teeny bit excited about the next thing. We can almost smell the glögg! No, it is not too soon – we have some already..)

What else do you like about autumn? Anything we missed, pop it in the comments please.

Useful Scandinavian words to start using in English

September 7, 2017 | 19 Comments

 

The best untranslatable Scandi words you need to include in your everyday use from now on and forever

Image: The utterly brilliant satwcomic.com

We have some great words that deserve to be used outside their humble Scandi origins. Thank you to everybody who wrote in with suggestions – we got far too many words to use them all, but we have included our best ones here.

  1. Lagom (pronounced [ˈlɑ̀ːɡɔm]). A very Swedish word. It means not too much, not too little. Just the right amount. You can have a lagom amount of coffee, for example. How many meatballs do you want? Lagom, please. Your shower can be lagom hot. Your coffee lagom strong.  It expresses a sense of balance and satisfaction with having your needs met without needing excess.
  2. Knullruffs  A Swedish word meaning ‘messy hair after having sex’. Yes, we have a word for that. ‘Hi Brenda, you have knullrufs today – I guess your date went well last night?’
  3. Poronkusema  An old Sami word meaning ‘the distance reindeer can travel before needing to urinate’. Used as a distance measure, as in “ There’s a Poronkusema to his house’ (7 kilometres, in case you were wondering).
  4. Fika A Swedish word meaning ‘ to meet up for a cup of coffee and a bun/cake. You can Fika as a noun or verb – to fika or go for a fika. It’s casual, but you can fika with your friends, or even have a fika date. You can fika with colleagues at work or even fika with your family. It’s a social thing: you can’t really fika alone.
  5. Hygge (hyggelig)  The ultimate Danish word. It means a state of lovely cosiness, on your own or with people you like. Doesn’t have to involve food, but it involves good feelings and happiness. You can hygge in front of the telly, or you can hygge at the local café. In front of the log fire with a good book is a nice place to hygge, too. Same word in Norwegian is Kos / koselig.
  6. Tandsmør – A Danish word, meaning ‘tooth butter’. Meaning: There is so much butter on your bread that your teeth leave bitemarks.
  7. Sambo and Mambo – In Sweden, if you live with your partner, you have a sambo. Samman = together and Bo = live. If you live at home with your mother, you Mambo. Yes, really.
  8. Pilkunnussija – A great Finnish word, literally: a comma fucker. A pedant; a person who corrects trivial or meaningless things. A person who believes it is their destiny to stamp out all spelling and punctuation mistakes. As in ‘Seriously, don’t be such a pilkunnussija’.
  9. Jamsk – A Danish dialect word that describes feeling under the weather, a little bit tired and just not quite right and have no desire for food. (Pronounced with a soft j, not a hard one).
  10. Utepils – A brilliant Norwegian word that simply means: To sit outside and enjoy a beer.
  11. Juoksentelisinkohan – A Finnish word that means: “I wonder if I should run around aimlessly?”
  12. Kabelsalat – Norwegian. Literally, Cable Salad. When all your cables and leads are mixed together.
  13. Forelsket – Norwegian and Danish word that means: That intoxicatingly euphoric feeling you experience when you’re first falling in love. Pre-real-love. More than fancy, less than love.
  14. Linslus/Linselus – A Swedish and Norwegian word, meaning ‘lens louse’ – Someone who always wants to have their face in a photo.
  15. Palla – Swedish. To steal fruit off trees. Eg. ‘Hey Kalle, let’s go palla in Andersson’s garden– they have pear trees and plums, too’. No doubt word enthusiasts will now email us saying the English word is “scrumping”. But as far as we could work out, you can only scrump apples. Let us know if we’re wrong about that, though.
  16. Slutspurt – The Danish word for ‘clearance sale’ (you can find this one almost always somewhere written largely across the store’s front windows). Literally: Race to the end.
  17. Klämdag – Swedish word, literally meaning Squeeze Day. If there is a bank holiday then a working day and then another day off, that working day will become a ‘squeeze day’ – and we’ll all be off work.
  18. Sliddersladder – A Danish word for gossiping and chitchat. (The d is soft)
  19. Buksvåger – What you call someone who has had sex with someone you’ve already had sex with. A useful Swedish word.
  20. Ogooglbar – Swedish for ‘ungoogleable’ – something you cannot Google.
  21. Orka / Orke – Danish, Swedish, Norwegian: This verb is a tremendously common word meaning “to have the energy”: ‘Do you orka to go into Oxford Street this weekend? No, Kalle, I don’t orkar it’.
  22. Attitydinkontinens – A Swedish word, literally meaning “attitude incontinence,” meaning: Inability to keep one’s opinions to oneself. As in: ‘Sorry for that long comment I left on your page, I guess I had a case of attitydinkontinens.’
  23. Fredagsmys – Swedish. Every Friday, we do this: Fredagsmys means Friday Cosy. Eat nice food, sweets, get cosy. Only on Fridays, though. Usually involves tacos (for some reason).
  24. Badkruka – Swedish for someone who refuses to enter the water. As in: ‘Get in the lake, you badkruka’.
  25. Gökotta – Swedish – to wake up in the morning with the purpose of going out to hear the birds sing.

Any we have missed out? Feel free to add more in the comments.

 

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You Know You’re Scandi When…

August 30, 2017 | Leave a comment

You know you’re Scandi when..

  1. You wouldn’t DREAM of drinking the water from the tap without letting it run for at least 5 seconds. Otherwise you end up with the ‘pipe-water’ that has been sitting there for hours. Eugh.tap water
  2. You automatically remove your shoes when you enter someone’s house.
  3. You happily drink a glass of milk with breakfast, lunch and your evening meal (no, not dinner – the one after – kveldsmat/aftensmad).mr melk milk glass
  4. You insist on having your sandwiches topless. Less bread, more delicious filling, what’s not to like?
  5. You think 11.30am is an acceptable time to have lunch.
  6. You hoard candles for autumn and winter and secretly can’t wait for the temp to drop so you can light all of them. Hygge!hygge candles
  7. You spend hours struggling with the correct level of politeness in emails. Scandinavians are direct – in spoken as well as written language. Pardon us whilst we work on our manners.
  8. You still think it’s weird that milk comes in plastic bottles and not in cardboard.paskekrim melkekartong norwegian Easter milk carton
  9. You wonder where the crispbread section and tube cheese section in the supermarket is.
  10. Your dream Friday night is staying in and relaxing in front of a film or TV show. Tacos for dinner, sweets and snacks after.
    Pick and mix fredagsmys fredagskos
  11. You own at least 3 pairs of knitted socks from your grandma.
  12. You think liquorice, especially the very salty kind, is delicious. In chocolate, with ice cream, in vodka.
    liquorice salmiakki lakris
  13. You own at least one weatherproof jacket.allvaersjakke-norwegian
  14. You can sing all the words to Helan Går (or at least look convincing whilst you mime)
  15. You wouldn’t dream of leaving the table without saying thank you for the food – and struggle to come up with an English translation that feels the same (no we haven’t cracked that one either)

WIN! Finnish Treats & Film Bundle

May 24, 2017 | Leave a comment

WIN! Finnish Treats & DVD Bundle

No weekend without Fredagsmys – settling down after a long week with something yummy to nibble on and mildly to highly entertaining on the TV is something many of us appreciate.

This week you can win a Finnish-themed treat-box – woohooo!

This week, we have teamed up with the lovely people at Artificial Eye to celebrate the release of The Other Side of Hope – a warm-hearted comedy directed by Finn Aki Kaurismäki – you can watch the trailer here.

We are giving away a lovely big bundle of Finnish sweets and snacks as well as the entire collection of Aki Kaurismäki DVDs, The Other Side of Hope poster and a Curzon Artifical Eye Tote Bag.

To win, simply answer this easy question..

The colours in the Finnish flag are..
A: Red, white and blue
B: Red and white
C: Blue and white

Send your answer to finland@scandikitchen.co.uk by 12 noon Wednesday the 31st of May 2017 to be in with a chance of winning.

The usual rules apply. UK residents only. No cheating. One main winner. No alternative prize and no cash alternative.

The Other Side of Hope hits cinemas on 26 May. Fancy seeing it? Find out where it’s playing and book your tickets here: www.theothersideofhope.com

*This competition is done in partnership with Artificial Eye and subject to change. The winner will be contacted directly.

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