Tag Archives: facts

Cinnamon bun facts

October 1, 2015 | Leave a comment

October 4th is official day of the Cinnamon Bun in Sweden. Here at ScandiKitchen, every day is bun day, but this week, we’re celebrating even more than usual.

We’ve put together some fact about the humble cinnamon bun so you can go entertain your mates down the pub with your expert bun fun knowledge.


The cinnamon bun is actually thought to originate from Sweden in the 1920’s, but didn’t really gain popularity until the fifties. The Annual Cinnamon Bun Day started in 1999.

Many nations have similar buns. Most Nordic buns are spiced with a bit of ground cardamom, which sets them apart from other cinnamon buns on this lovely planet of ours.

A real Scandinavian cinnamon bun doesn’t have any icing on top. Just nibbed sugar, also known as pearl sugar.


The biggest cinnamon bun ever was baked in on Feb 10, 2006, weighing in at 111.8kg. Wayne and Anita Warren, owners of The House of Bread in Mill Creek, Washington received their certificate from the Guinness Book of World Records for the largest cinnamon roll ever made.

It is a proven fact that it is impossible to resist a freshly baked cinnamon bun. You just can’t.

The biggest buns in Sweden are called Hagabullar.


The average Swede eats 316 cinnamon buns a year (The average Torben at ScandiKitchen eats more than that)

Sweden imports 375 tonnes of cinnamon every year.

Some people love them so much that make them in to earrings – which really looks rather suspect….


Or wear them as costumes


Or even as hair pieces…


Or sing about cinnamon buns…

And books have been written about them….


Get yourself a bun cushion…


The @ sign in Swedish is sometimes referred to as ‘kanelbulle’. So, iloveherring – kanelbulle – scandikitchen.co.uk.

Cinnamon bun in Swedish is Kanelbulle, in Norway, its Skillingsbolle. In Danish, Kanelsnegl and in Finnish, Korvapuusti – literally meaning Slapped Ear.


Some people make horrible things, such as Bacon Cinnamon Rolls. Actual bacon baked into it. We do not like those people. Some people also make Cinnamon Roll Burgers. This is  a criminal offence in Sweden. Maybe. Okay, it’s not, but it should be.


There are two kinds of cinnamon: Ceylon cinnamon, also known as “true cinnamon” (cinnamon verum) is very expensive. Therefore, most foods in the USA and Western Europe, including sticky buns, breads and other products use the cheaper Cassia cinnamon (dried Cassia bark).

Cinnamon contains Coumarin, which is not great for the body and can damage the liver. You should only eat 0.1 milligram per day. Danish food police tested a lot of bakeries a few years back and found we were all being overdosed by cinnamon. Don’t fear, though, if you use the good quality cinnamon, the levels of coumarin are very low. So, don’t skimp on your cinnamon quality and you’ll be fine to add a few extra spoonful to your filling.

Enjoy Bun Day on the 4th October – we want to see your buns, so don’t forget to send us a picture to iloveherring@scandikitchen.co.uk and we’ll post the best ones on facebook and instagram. Prizes for the best looking buns.

Payment types accepted
Secure Shopping with
Free shipping on orders over £60
£0.000 items