Tag Archives: danish

Pimp My Gingerbread House 2016

November 24, 2016 | Leave a comment

Pimp My Gingerbread House 2016

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It’s beginning to smell like Gingerbread.. That’s right, it’s that time of year again – it’s time for our annual Pimp My gingerbread House competition!

Every year in the run up to Christmas we run a competition – who can go crazy with a standard gingerbread house kit?

The rules;

Take one basic Gingerbread house kit from Annas and pimp it up to the best of your abilities. Think outside the box: be as creative, crazy and elaborate as you want. Whatever your strong side, put it into the house.

When you are done, send us a picture and we will put the best ones up on Instagram and Facebook and the blog during December.

We have four categories:

Adult – Beautiful: This is the main award. The most beautiful house you can make from a very basic kit of gingerbread house.

Adult – Super Creative.   This is the crazy house – like the house eaten by dragons, murder scenes, brothels, discos – whatever you can do to pimp up your house to silly standards with great use of imagination.

Child – up to 7 years old. It’s okay that your Mum and Dad help out, but here we do want to see real kids efforts. We know what seven year olds can do with a ginger bread kit – we want to see kids being allowed to unleash creativity. It’s fine to add Lego men and other toys to the mix or make a gingerbread house for your favourite dolls.

Young person 8-16 – We want to see your imagination run wild here. Make the house your own.

THIS YEAR’S PRIZES:

First prize this year in category ‘beautiful’ is £50 online OR in-store voucher for ScandiKitchen, a signed copy of our new baking book ‘Fika & Hygge’ and one of our fancy new mugs.

Adult – Creative – A hamper full of goodies and treats plus a signed baking book.

Children under 7: Sweeties. And more Sweeties. So many sweeties your Mum will be quite annoyed with us all the way through till January.

Young person 8-16 prize: Sweets. And more Sweets. So many sweeties your Mum will be quite annoyed with us and also a little jealous that it is all for you.

The rules:

      • All entries MUST be made from a basic Gingerbread House kit. We stock the one from Anna’s, which is the preferred one, but if you use the IKEA version that is also fine (they are similar in shape and size). Basically, the basic shape of the house must be the same so we can see just how creative you can be with a pre-fab kit. Any entries not made from the similar in size and shape to the Ikea and Anna’s kit will not be accepted, sorry.
      • When you submit photos, you need to state what category you are entering into.
      • Only one entry per person
      • If more than one person submits the same entry, the prize will be shared.
      • No alternative prize, no cash prizes, no exchanges.
      • Entries must be received before 16th December 2016 at noon to iloveherring@scandikitchen.co.uk
      • Employees of ScandiKitchen ltd not eligible to enter (Rebekka, we’re talking to you)
      • Winners will be picked by a jury of lovely people (most likely a selection of our customers – we usually pick 5 judges from Twitter to help us out).
      • The judges decisions are final.
      • Prizes can be sent to UK address only.

Send your photos to iloveherring@scandikitchen.co.uk before 16th December at noon to enter the competition. We look forward to seeing your creations.

Love

The Kitchen People x

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The Breakfast Edition; Scandi VS British Breakfast

September 15, 2016 | Leave a comment

Breakfast, Frokost, Morgenmad, Frukost. 

As the saying goes (well, in Scandinavia at least), dear child bears many names. We love breakfast. It is often the main reason we go to bed at night – to fast forward to another lovely meal. Best enjoyed with big yawns, squinty eyes and coffee-hungry brains.

Fun-fact: In Sweden and Norway, breakfast is called Frukost/Frokost. The same word means lunch in Denmark. In Denmark, breakfast is called morgenmad – morning food. So naturally, a lot of confusion arises around the two first meals of the day when Scandis visit each other. Frokost? Nej mand, it is way too early. Frokost? Vad då, it is far too late!

Ah, the stress!

Important-fact: 1 of 3 children in the UK don’t have breakfast. We are working with charity Magic Breakfast to reduce this number – please read more here about this important cause.

Whatever you call it, the first meal of the day is important, and each country has its own traditions. Scandinavian breakfasts differs a lot from the British – so, because we know you’ve been wondering, let us present – some basic differences between British breakfasts vs Scandi breakfasts .

The Brits have.. toast.
In Sweden: Crispbread. More crispbread.
In Norway: Various breads or crispbread. The one called Frukost.
In Denmark: Rye bread.

swedish crispbread knackebrod

The Brits top theirs with.. butter and Marmite or jam.
In Sweden: Egg and kaviar, cheese (Aseda graddost)
In Norway: Norvegia cheese or brown cheese.
In Denmark: Cheese. Butter.

Swedish breakfast egg kaviar

The Brits drink..tea or instant coffee.
In Sweden: Black coffee. Proper brewed coffee. Like this one from Zoegas.
In Norway: Black coffee. Sometimes with milk. This one from Friele, for example.
In Denmark: Black coffee. Proper brewed coffee. You get the drill.. we all like real coffee!

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The Brits also drink..orange juice.
In Sweden: Milk, sometimes juice.
In Norway: Milk, juice sometimes.
In Denmark: Milk or juice.

Milk for breakfast in Sweden, Denmark, Norway

 

The Brits who don’t eat bread eats.. cereal.
In Sweden: Filmjolk (a light natural yougurt) with granola or musli and some berries. Or kalaspuffar.
In Norway: Frokostblanding – breakfast mix! Ie., cereal. With banana  if you’re being virtuous.
In Denmark: Skyr or Ymer – a type of natural yogurt – with Ymerdrys – a lovely rye bread crumb cereal. 
swedish breakfast kalaspuffar
For a weekend breakfast, the Brit will have.. a full English (or components thereof).

In Sweden: ALL the crispbread. Several types of bread. Eggs and kaviar, different cheeses, jams, perhaps a ham or pate. Something bun-like. Yogurt pots, fresh fruits, something with egg. Coffee. Juices. Milk. Many many hours, newspapers and good company.

In Norway: Several types of bread. Toaster handy. Fresh rolls. Norvegia and brown cheese. Boilt eggs. Ham and chopped up cucumber and red pepper. Tomatoes. Jams. Pate. Basically – your entire fridge. Milk and juice to drink. Coffee AND tea. Many many hours, the radio in the background and good company.

In Denmark: Fresh rolls from the baker – at least one per person plus a Danish pastry and white bread, which is never normally eaten. Rye bread. Cheeses and jams and marmalade. OR a full on Scandi brunch with scrambled eggs, bacon, all the sandwich toppings in the fridge. Juice and milk, tea and coffee. Perhaps a shot of Gammel Dansk (a digestif) or three if it is a special occasion.

dansk morgenmad danish breakfast

Drool.

 

There you have it. The full low down on Scandi breakfasts. Fancy it? To shop Scandi favourite cheeses, jams, coffees and more have a look in our webshop – click  here.

Look Inside: Fika & Hygge Baking Book

September 8, 2016 | Leave a comment

Our New Book – A Look Inside

Yes, we talk a lot about Fika & Hygge – especially now with our new book officially out. It is a baking book, with recipes from across Scandinavia. From small bakes and biscuits, to celebration cakes and elaborate buns there’s something there for any occasion, small or large – certain to add to the feeling of hygge. In addition, the beautiful pictures makes us all long for winter in Scandinavia (even the non-Scandis!) with crinkly white snow, lots and lots of candles, knitted jumpers and fika-time inside.

Here are a few of the ScandiKitchen staff’s favourite recipes from the book (we were lucky enough to do a lot of cake-testing for this one! All in the name of creating the best baking book possible).

That Banana Cake Therese

‘That banana cake’ is the banana cake we serve in our cafe. Wonderfully moist and full of banana flavour, with a light frosting that perfectly complements the dense cake. Worth hunting down brown bananas for.

Banana Cake - ScandiKitchen

 Sarah Bernard – Biskvier – Martina

Little delectable morsels of chocolate, chocolate cream and a marzipanny base. Unbeatable combination and great with a cup of coffee, or as a simple dessert with a scoop of good quality vanilly ice cream. Super rich – but I somehow manage to squeeze in at least three of these. They take a little time to put together, but the result is worth it!

Sarah Bernhard - ScandiKitchen

Gingerbread with Lingonberry – Roxanne

Soft spiced gingerbread cake layered with cream flavoured with fresh tart lingonberries and a hint of sweetness – just delicious. And very pretty too.

Gingerbread & Lingonberry Cake - ScandiKitchen

 

Have the book? Do let us know if you try any of the recipes – we’d love to hear about it.

WIN a pair of tickets to see THE COMMUNE

July 21, 2016 | Leave a comment

WIN a pair of tickets to see THE COMMUNE

The very talented BAFTA­nominated Danish director Thomas Vinterberg’s that previously had us following Helge’s 60th birthday party in the movie ‘Festen’ (The Celebration) and the dramatic events occurring for a teacher in the movie Jagten (The Hunt) is now releasing a new movie – and we can’ wait to see it.

The new movie that is inspired by the directors own childhood experiences is called The Commune (Kollektivet) and takes place in Denmark during the early 70’s and is performed by a stunning ensemble cast, most notably Trine Dyrholm, who was awarded the Silver Bear for Best Actress at Berlin 2016 for her role as Anna. In this drama you get to follow the clash that can occur between people when desires surface and put solidarity to the test. You get to follow Erik, a professor of architecture, his wife Anna, and daughter Freja as Erik Inherits a Large mansion in suburban Copenhagen and they decide to set up a commune and invite friends, acquaintances and strangers to live with them. But when Erik begins an affair with Emma, a beautiful young student from his course, the spirit of free love that formed the foundations of the commune will threaten to bring it all tumbling down…

 

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The Commune gets released in cinemas across the country on the 29th.

To celebrate the upcoming movie by one of our favorite Scandinavian directors we at ScandiKitchen, in collaboration with Curzon Cinemas, want to give you the opportunity to WIN two tickets to go and see the movie.

In order to participate in the competition you need to answer the following question:

Denmark’s second largest city is….

  1. a) Malmö
  2. b) Århus
  3. c) Middelfart

Send your answer to iloveherring@scandikitchen.co.uk before Tuesday 26th July 2016 midday. Terms for competition: The winner will be drawn at random from all correct entries. Winner will get two tickets to go and see the movie at Curzon Cinema in London or watch it on demand if outside London. No alternative prize, no cash alternative. Winner must be 18 or over. All responsibilities of this competition lies with Curzon Cinema.

 

We wish you all good luck and here you can see the trailer or go to www.TheCommuneFilm.com for more information about the movie and get as exited as we are!

A Scandinavian Barbecue

May 26, 2016 | Leave a comment

 

Let’s Have a Barbecue – Scandi Style!

Warmer weather and glimpses of sun can only mean one thing – barbecue season is here.

Here’s what you need for a Scandi barbecue.

The nibbles:

Nibbles are important – everyone without a gas barbecue knows this. It always takes about 5 hours to get hot enough to cook anything on so nibbles are crucial to avoid eating each other during the wait.
We like crisps – especially dill chips and sour cream and onion. They’re especially nice with a refreshing dip – such as Estrella Dill dip mix or Holiday.

    Estrella Sourcream & Onion Chips – Sourcream & Onion Crisps 175g
    £2.50
    - +
    Estrella Holiday Dipmix – Onion & Pepper Dip Mix 26g
    £1.20
    - +
    Estrella Dillchips – Dill Crisps 175g
    £2.50
    - +

The barbecue bit:

Unless you have a gas barbecue, sausages are the way to go. They cook in less than an hour, are easy to eat standing up, can hold most toppings – and crucially – they taste good even when they’re a bit burnt.
We LOVE the barbecue range from Per I Viken – which includes spicy chorizo, herby Salsiccia and the super savoury Bratwurst. For kids, red hot dogs or classic wienerkorv always go down a treat.

    Per i Viken Salsiccia Korv – Salsiccia Sausage 250g
    £2.80
    Per i Viken Bratwurst 3-pack – Bratwurst Sausage 300g
    £2.00
    Per i Viken BBQ Chorizo Korv – BBQ Chorizo Sausage 250g
    £2.80

    Per i Viken Wienerkorv – Wiener Sausages 8-pack
    £4.00
    - +
    Gøl Røde Pølser – Red Hot Dogs 375g
    £4.80
    - +

The bready bits:

Classic sausage buns are a must – the softer sweeter bun contrasts oh so well with the meaty sausages. Norwegians are partial to a thin potato flatbread; lompe, which also works a treat.
Not traditional, but very nice, is Swedish soft flatbread. Take it easy on the toppings, though, as this tends to be more fragile than the other two.

    Polarbrod Sarek – Thin Flatbread 8-pack
    £2.00
    Korvbrödsbagarn Korvbröd – Hotdog Buns 10-pack
    £2.00
    Bjørken Lomper 10-pack – Soft Potato Flatbread 260g
    £2.15
    - +

The condiments:

A barbecue needs a good range of condiments. Ketchup, several types of mustard, pickles, remoulade, mayonnaise, skagenrora (if you’re from Gothenburg), and crispy onions are absolutely non-negotiable; we like everything at once, but if you fancy a slightly lighter version we recommend you try one of the following combos:

The Swede: Ketchup, mustard, bostongurka and crispy onions. In a bun.
The Dane: Remoulade. Other bits, optional.
The Norwegian: Ketchup, mustard, crispy onions. In lompe.

    Johnnys Senap Sötstark – Hot and Sweet Mustard 500g
    £3.30
    - +
    Bähncke Stærk Sennep – Sharp Mustard 380g
    £3.00 £2.40
    - +
    Bähncke Hotdog Ketchup 405g
    £3.00
    - +
    ScandiKitchen Skagenröra – Seafood Salad 200g
    £3.00
    - +
    Felix Bostongurka – Pickled Cucumber Relish 375g
    £2.65
    - +
    Beauvais Agurkesalat – Pickled Cucumber 550g
    £2.90
    - +
    K-Salat Remoulade – Sweet Piccalilli Sauce 375g
    £3.00
    - +
    K-Salat Mayonnaise 375g
    £3.00
    - +

Drinks;

Cold beers and soft drinks.

    Ringnes Solo – Orange Soft Drink 330ml
    £2.00
    - +
    Nils Oscar God Lager 5.3% – Beer 330ml
    £2.30
    - +
    Hansa Pilsner Beer 6x500ml
    £14.00

Other bits; An umbrella. A kitchen ready to take over the cooking should the barbecue fail you. More snacks, something sweet to finish with – such as pick and mix and gifflar.

    Pick’n’Mix WITH Liquorice 200g
    £2.50
    - +
    Pågen Kanelgifflar – Mini Cinnamon Buns 260g
    £2.25
    - +
    Ahlgrens Bilar Original – Fruity Marshmallow Sweets 125g
    £1.95
    - +

To view our Barbecue corner – click here. Happy barbecuing!

How to be Danish

April 14, 2016 | 1 Comment

How to be Danish, even if you’re not in Denmark – A quick guide.

So, you want to be more Danish? You don’t need to go to Denmark to be ‘dansker’ – just follow this quick do-it-at-home guide and you’ll be saying nå-nā to everything before you know it. Ja ja, nå-nā. Så så.

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  1. If someone asks you ‘how are you’, be sure to explain how you are really feeling. Don’t leave any details out – the other person surely wants to know, because he asked you.

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2. Kaff. Drink a lot of coffee. Danes love strong filter coffee. Nowadays, Danes also love Latte, which they pronounce Ladde. Also, Coffee is Kaffe, but if you are from the sticks, you call it Kaff (way cooler).

3. Dansk is always better Every time someone says anything about anything, just say: “in Denmark, we have that. Except ours is better”.

As in:

Friend: “I love these wonderful chairs I just bought”

You: “We have the best chair designers in the world in Denmark. Ours are better”

And

Friend: Try these pastries, they are delicious.

You: We have pastries in Denmark, they are better.

4. You know that Nothing Swedish is ever as good as anything Danish. You know this. But if it is, it was probably invented by a Dane or it’s from Skåne region, which is almost Danish anyway. Zlatan is actually Danish.

5. Copenhagen your apartment. It’s super simple: Paint everything white. Doors, floors, walls. Every single surface. Remove all curtains. Add one statement chair (by a Danish designer), a sheepskin from a remote Swedish farm, a tasteful sofa in sleek design, a small sofa table… Thou shalt not add cushions. Two candle sticks in steel. A stack of tasteful magazines full of pictures of bearded cool men, and women wearing huge scarves. One framed art poster. Limit Ikea furniture to those pieces nobody can identify as Ikea.

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6. Wear black. Stylish, black clothes, that’s how Danes like it. Your blonde hair up in a messy bun or a stylish crop. Grow a Viking beard if you’re a guy. Did we mention wear black? Add huge black/white scarf and black coat.

7. Bike everywhere. Preferably, you have one trouser leg stuffed inside your sock at all times to protect it from the bike chain. It’s a good look, don’t worry, perfectly acceptable at work or parties. Once you have kids, get a Christiania bike and start ferrying the little ones around on your bike, too. Sell your car. Also, helmets are not used because they mess up your nice messy hair do.

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8. No please. There isn’t a word for please, so you need to start functioning without it. Just say ‘Tak’ (thank you) instead – or be brave and rely on your politeness purely through tone of voice (very tricky, even for Danes)

9. Test ANY non-Scandi on whether they like salty liquorice. Then insist they try it, even if they don’t want to. Laugh at them when they go green in the face.

cake

10. When it’s your child’s birthday, make a cake in shape of a boy or girl. Decorate it with loads of sweets. When you cut the head off in one clean swoop, everybody screams loudly, and laughs. It’s a Danish thing. It really is.

11. Have an awkward sense of humour and laugh at Nordic jokes such as “Do you know how to save a Swede from drowning? No? Good!” HarHarHarHar… Why wasn’t Jesus born Norwegian? They couldn’t find Three Wise Men… HARHARHARHAR. Also, see point 10. Awkward.

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12. Remoulade – you thought you needed Ketchup? You don’t. Just throw it all away and replace with remoulade – a sweet curried piccalilli type dressing. Eat it with fried fish, roast beef, chips, salami… Anything.

13. Speak on your inhale. We don’t notice that we do it – but we do, when we say ja (yes), sometimes.

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14. Love your flag. Really LOVE the Danish flag. At any opportunity (birthday, Sundays, going to the shops), fly your flag in your garden flagpole (because you have one of those – but NEVER after 6 pm because that is not allowed). Every cake, decorate it with little flags. Wave flags around like a nutter. Flags everywhere.

15. Jam & Cheese open sandwiches Because it tastes good. Rye bread, strong cheese – and a good dollop of strawberry jam. You know it makes sense.

16. Eat lunch at 11 am. Well, why wouldn’t you? Also, get to work for 7:30 am. Leave at 16:00, sharp.

17. Never stay at work past 16:00. If you do, the other Danes will make fun of you and talk behind your back and call you nasty things like ‘morakker’ – someone who makes others look bad by staying late – a very bad thing in Danish culture. You have until 16:01 to be out the front door and on your bike.

18. Nå. This is your new favourite word. Nå. Depending on how you pronounce it, it can mean:

      • How cute!
      • I understand
      • Total surprise
      • How are you?
      • Threatening someone
      • Agreeing with someone
      • Being impatient with someone

19. Danes may ask to ‘borrow’ your bathroom. Don’t worry, they always give it back.  It’s a literal translation. They may also ask to borrow a cigarette. But they especially like borrowing your bathroom. In turn, they find it odd that you are ON the bus and not IN the bus.

20. Directness. Danes do not mess about. They get right to the point. There is no fluffy middle layer. It’s not rude, it’s just… Danish. Also, they do not understand when you say something you don’t mean – see point 1.

shame

21. Swearing. Danes swear in English, which can be off putting to the average Brit to listen to. The F-word is used liberally by all, even children. ‘Shit’ is also used a lot. Swearing in English is perfectly acceptable – but swearing in Danish is absolutely not. Danes moving abroad usually have a period of adjustment. Danes returning to Denmark after living in the UK spend the first 6 months in red-faced shame.

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22. Hygge You understand the internal soul space of Hygge, to feel content and cosy in your surrounding with the people you are with. Time does not matter. Do this effortlessly several times a day to be a real Dane. Also, pronounce it properly (who-guh). Minus 10 points if you have ever rhymed hygge with jiggy.

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23. The Law of Jante. Underlying every fibre of the Danish psyche is our version of Tall Poppy Syndrome, except much stricter and inward bound. Don’t think you are any better than us, don’t think you can teach us anything. Don’t think you are special. Officially, you shun Janteloven – but when the neighbour buys as Aston Martin, then it creeps up on you.

Janeteloven’s rules also means that no Dane ever takes credit for anything. If something goes well for you, make sure to remind everybody it was because of the help from people around you. If nobody helped you, blame it on luck, Never take the credit yourself. As in:

Them: Congratulations on hitting the number 1 in 38 countries with your new single

You: It was because of the people who bought the music.

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24. Fredagshygge and Lørdagsslik. It’s Friday, and you have Friday Hygge. Sit in with a bowl of crisps and hygge in front of the telly. On Saturday, they eat Saturday sweets – repeat over, but with sweets instead of crisps.

frikadeller

25. Stop eating Swedish meatballs. They are Swedish, not Danish. Real Danes eat Frikadeller, which are basically the same, but bigger (and better – see point 2). Also, if you are really Danish, you call them Dunser. Your mum’s meatballs are always referred to as dunser – but don’t call them Dunser in a restaurant.

26. Danes love Hotdogs. There are hotdog carts all over the country, manned by sour people who really don’t want to talk to you. Except the happy hotdog cart at the arrivals at airport, but that one is manned by Swedes from over the bridge. Danes returning from abroad always have to buy one hotdog at the airport (it’s the law) and without fail always start a conversation with the hotdog vendor, realise he is Swedish and then the whole thing falls apart into a very awkward sausage related silence.

Can you think of anything else that could make you distinctly Danish? Let us know in the comments field and we may add it to the list.

Ps. yes, this list was written by a Dane.

Got that Danish craving now? For Danish herring – liquorice – cheeses and more – visit our webshop and get 10% off your first order – just enter ‘scandilife10’ at checkout.

Waffle-Day & Useful Info About Scandinavian Waffles

March 23, 2016 | Leave a comment

Waffle-Day & Useful Info About Scandinavian Waffles

Waffles are a big thing in Scandinavia. Thin and heart-shaped they come with a boatload of strong opinions on how to eat them, when to eat them and what to put on them. There are as many opinions as there are recipes – as many recipes as there are waffle-lovers.

One thing we all agree on is how we feel about them. Waffles are – it seems – a truly nostalgic thing. Something we all remember from our childhoods. From a fika with the family, a well deserved break in the (not-so) strenuous Sunday hike, a treat in between matches in the annual week-long summer football tournament, or from any given Wednesday at your lovely, lovely work-place (where waffles often appear on Wednesdays for some unknown reason).

You may have some questions about waffles and why we waffle (pardon the pun?) on so much about them. That’s ok. Your waffle-fears may now be put to rest – we’re here to educate you about Scandinavian waffles.

1. What is a Scandinavian waffle and how is it different from a Belgian Waffle?

A Scandinavian waffle differs from the Belgian in many ways, most notably is the shape. Scandinavian waffles are thinner, and typically consist of 4-5 heart shapes joint in a ring, as opposed to the rectangular Belgian version. Heart-shaped = even lovelier, of course.
scandinavian waffle vs belgian waffle
The batter is also different – Scandinavian waffles tend to have a less sweet batter, often with a sour component such as sour cream. They should be crispy and slightly buttery with a slightly sweet flavour.

2. Why do we celebrate the Waffle-day on the 25th of March?

Good question! Waffle-day is originally a Swedish thing, and the reason it is on the 25th of March is that the Swedish word for Waffle day – Våffeldagen – sounds very similar to ‘Vårfrudagen’ (Our lady’s day), which is the day Jesus was ‘conceived’. 25th of March = 9 months before Christmas Day.
‘But of course!’, the Swedes thought, ‘we need a dedicated waffle day but it would be confusing to have two days with such a similar sounding name. Let’s combine the two and make it one super-holiday where we can celebrate the beginning of Jesus AND eat waffles.’
(Did we mention how much we love the Swedes?) There you have it – a phonetic phenomenon is the reason for waffle-day being when it is. And some lovely Swedish logic.

3. What can I put on my waffle?

In Scandinavia, most people choose sweet toppings, including a variety of jams, whipped cream or fresh fruit and berries in summer. Waffles are not necessarily limited to sweet toppings though – try creme fraiche and smoked salmon for a lovely savoury waffle.

 

Here are 5 other ways to eat Scandinavian waffles;
  1. Waffle with brown cheese – melting, tangy/sweet brown cheese on a mildly sweet, waffle hot from the griddle. It is a beautiful thing. Top with raspberry jam for a sweeter finish. A Norwegian speciality. No, you can’t swap the jam. Some people also eat waffles with brown cheese and kaviar (yep – this stuff).
    Brunost_vaffel brown cheese waffle
  2. Hot-dog in waffle. Yep, you read that right. A steamed wiener-sausage wrapped in a sweet waffle. It’s a staple in Moss (in the middle of nowhere) and the Norwegian equivalent to a certain Gordon Ramsay is rumoured to be the man behind it, when he as a young boy worked in his uncle’s hot dog stand. Sounds odd, tastes delicious. Slightly sweet waffle paired with a savoury, meaty sausage. Yum!
    hot dog waffles
  3. Waffle with whipped cream and wild strawberries. This indulgence screams summer. Tiny, sweet, intensely flavoured wild strawberries – called smultron in Swedish with a ligthly sweetened whipped cream. Just..pure tastebud-waffle-bliss. In lack of smultron you can sub your favourite fresh seasonal fruit or berries or a good quality jam at a pinch.
    vaffel med rømme og syltetøy - waffle with sour cream and jam
  4. Waffle with butter. Yours truly – Martina, in this case – has the following method of ensuring the perfect amount of butter on the waffle; ‘Think of the little diamond dents in the waffles as windows. The goal of buttering it is to light up each window. In other words, fill each dent with lovely salted butter. This is tooth-butter meet waffle. A sprinkling of sugar if you so desire – then tuck in.
    vaffel med smør - scandinavian waffle
  5. Waffle with jam and sour cream. Your favourite sweet jam and a dollop of thick sour cream. Delicious. You will have more than one – just give in already. Napkin at the ready!
    vaffel med rømme og syltetøy - waffle with sour cream and jam

Now we want to hear your waffle-memories.

Perhaps you spent a summer frying waffles day in and day out to feed the hordes of hungry tween-agers playing football?

Or you have a favourite recipe you’d like to share? A favourite topping? Do let us know – we’d love to learn more.

Fancy waffles? We do, too.. Here’s our favourite recipe for crispy Swedish waffles, the recipe is a sneakpeek from ou new cookbook (out later this year). Or for instant waffle-satisfaction, shop our waffle mixes here – there’s even a gluten-free version there.

Open Sandwiches – Video

January 20, 2016 | Leave a comment

Watch Bronte Aurell demonstrate some of her favourite open sandwiches from the ScandiKitchen Cookbook – from smoked salmon to roast beef, egg and prawn, smoked mackarel and fennel and apple.

A mini-guide to ‘Hygge’

October 8, 2015 | 1 Comment

Is it a Danish thing?

The Danes claim it as their own. But really, it’s a Norwegian word. Danes started using it in the 1900’s, but truthfully, it isn’t Danish at all. Most Danes will deny this, of course, seeing as it is now such a huge part of what makes a Dane really Danish. In fact, let’s just say it is as Danish as Danish can be.

What does it mean?

It’s an elevated state of cosiness. Often with dimmed light (although not always – you can still hygge in the park or garden on a sunny day). Think people close to you, woolly socks, fire place, candlelight. Happy feelings, warm feelings. Nothing else matters.

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How do I use the word ‘hygge’?

Hygge is a verb. You can ‘hygge’ with friends and family, even on your own. Something can be ‘hyggeligt’ which means it is has the potential to help you ‘hygge’. A corner of a room can look ‘hyggeligt’, but you need to be in it to ‘hygge’.

How do I pronounce it?

[ˈhyɡ̊ə]  – click here for a bit of help

HYGGE

Why do I need to understand ‘hygge’?

Because its such an important feeling, it is now taught as a subject at a UK college level. Click here for article 

Truth: The presence of sweets, cakes and crisps is the easiest way to speed up the feeling of ‘hygge’.

Example: You sit down in front of the telly with your besties to watch a good movie. It’s nice. Add a bowl of dillchips, some Marabou chocolate and a packet of Gott & Blandat and suddenly, it’s ‘hygge’.

Example 2: You invite friends over. You enjoy a glass of wine, you light some candles. Add a bowl of sweets or crisps to the table, and ‘hygge’ happens instantly.

‘Hygge’ is a compliment

‘Hyggeligt’ is a big compliment to someone who created it. If you’ve been at someone’s house for dinner and you tell the host it was ‘hyggeligt’, you are paying them a big compliment.

Is the English word ‘hug’ linked to ‘hygge’?

There is a slight debate about this.   Etymonline says:

HUG: 1560s, hugge “to embrace, clasp with the arms,” of unknown origin; perhaps from Old Norse hugga “to comfort,” from hugr “courage, mood,” from Proto-Germanic *hugjan, related to Old English hycgan “to think, consider,” Gothic hugs “mind, soul, thought,” and the proper name Hugh. Others have noted the similarity in some senses to German hegen “to foster, cherish,” originally “to enclose with a hedge.” Related: Hugged; hugging.

Well, it’s a possibility that there is a Scandinavian link there. In terms of meaning, there is certainly some overlap. You know that feeling you get after someone gives you a great big bear hug? That feeling, in candle light, with a bag of crisps and some chocolate and some good friends. Let’s decide that this is the link, shall we?

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Does ‘hygge’ have seasons?

Sort of. While you can ‘hygge’ all year around, it is particularly easy to ‘hygge’ when it is darker outside. We do darkness quite well in Scandinavia – and we love candles. So it makes it easier to get to that ‘hygge’ feeling.

The high season for ‘hygge’ is Christmas. Think cottage in the snow. Mulled wine. Cosy, cosy, cosy.

Will a Swede understand it if I tell him we need to ‘hygge’?

It’s not a Swedish word. But he’ll probably get the meaning – in Sweden, a similar word is ‘Mysigt’. Same with a Norwegian (it’s called ‘Kos’ in Norway).

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Can you ‘hygge’ alone?

Sort of. Maybe in bed on a Sunday morning, feeling warm and cosy. With the papers. TV on.

Can you, ehm, ‘hygge’, in a romantic way?

Yes. Candle light and Marvin Gaye. It’s universal ‘hygge’. A bowl of crisps optional in these situations.

Why are there no real translatable words to hygge?

We like to think it was only ever meant to be felt, not explained.

Join us. Feel it.

Recipe: Danish Medaljer and Cremelinser cakes

March 19, 2015 | Leave a comment

Danish ‘Medaljer’ and ‘CremeLinser’ cakes

Makes approx. 8-9 ‘Medaljer’ and 12 ‘Linser’

Equipment needed:

Piping nozzle for cream

Yorkshire pudding tray

Round cutters 6-7 cm and 5 cm.

Dough

200g cold butter, cubed

350g plain flour

125g icing sugar

1 egg

1 tsp vanilla (optional)

 

Filling

Make this ahead of starting:

1 sachet ‘Kagecreme’ crème patisserie (approx. 500ml crème patisserie) – get it HERE

How to: Mix the content of sachet with 500ml whole milk. Whisk for 30-40 seconds, then leave to set for 15 minutes.

You can also use homemade cold crème patisserie for this instead, but we cheated a bit – and this powder is really good quality and is bake-safe.

 Assembly:

300ml whipping cream

4-5 tbsp strawberry or raspberry jam

6 strawberries

150g icing sugar

1 tsp cocoa

Edible decorations of choice

 

Method

Make the dough:

In a mixer / food processor, add butter and flour and blitz a few times, then add the rest of the ingredients and mix until combined and smooth. Fold together and wrap in clingfilm and leave to rest in the fridge for 30 minutes.

Turn on oven to 180C.

Cut the dough in two pieces.

Medaljer – roll out and cut 18 round circles with the 7 cm cutter. Place on a lined baking tray and then bake 5-7 mins in the warm oven until slightly golden (taking care not to over bake).

Meanwhile, roll out the remaining dough for the Cremelinser. Use flour if it is a bit sticky.

Cut circles to line the base of the 12-hole Yorkshire pudding tray – the dough should go to the top line, neatly. Add a good heaped teaspoon of crème patisserie to each ‘Linser’. Roll the remaining dough out flat, then cut the smaller 5cm circles. Carefully top each Linser with the pastry circle and press down gently around the edges to close.

Bake in the oven for around 10 minutes or until done taking care not to allow the Liner to crack open and the custard to seep out (but if it does a bit, don’t worry, it will sink again when cold).

To assemble the Medaljer:

Make the strawberry whipped cream:

With a blender, blend 6-7 strawberries (or mash them very thoroughly with a fork). Whip the whipping cream with a tbsp. icing sugar, and add 3-4 tbs strawberry puree. Allow stiff peaks to form.

Lay out 9 baked circles on a tray. Add ½ tsp jam to the base of each circle, then a tsp of crème patisserie in the middle. Using a piping bag with a wide cream nozzle, pipe cream in a circle around the base of 9 of the baked circles. Keep cold.

Place the remaining 9 circles on the table. Mix the icing sugar and 1tsp cocoa powder with a few tbsp. hot water until you have a smooth icing – not too runny. If the icing gets too runny, add more icing sugar – you want the consistency so it will not spill over the edges.

Carefully add a dollop of icing to each circle and top with a few decorations. Carefully place the lids onto the ‘Medaljer’ and cream.

A perfect selection of real Danish cakes to serve with your afternoon coffee.

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