Tag Archives: chocolate recipe

Recipe: Polly Gooey Brownie

January 30, 2016 | Leave a comment

I love brownies. Who doesn’t? Lovely, sticky and decadent – a good brownie rarely fails to satisfy.

Then again, I also love sweets – Polly is a particular weakness of mine. Lush milk chocolate covered marshmallows – chewy and extremely moreish. So, why not pair the two?

This recipe is super easy to make – and if you don’t have Polly, you can replace by Dumle / Chocolate chunks / other kinds of marshmallows / Bilar…

Tin: 20 x 20 cm tin approx. (different sized tins means baking time will simply vary, so adjust accordingly).


200g 70% dark chocolate

250g butter

275g caster sugar

3 eggs

75g plain flour

50 g good quality cocoa (we use Fazer kakao, its brilliant)

Pinch of salt

1tsp vanilla sugar or extract

150g Polly sweets



Turn the oven to 170C (160 fan).

Melt the butter and chocolate and set aside – you can do this either in a water bath or in the microwave.

Mix eggs and sugar (no need to over whisk it much as you don’t want the brownie to rise). Ensure the chocolate has cooled down a bit and then mix into the egg mix.

Sift the flour, cocoa, vanilla and salt into the bowl and fold with a spatula until smooth – take care again not to over whisk. Fold in half of the Polly sweets.

Line the baking tray with baking paper and pour the mixture in. Add the rest of the Polly treats on top.

Bake for 25-30 minutes or until a skewer comes out clean at the side – the middle can still be gooey (but it should not wobble when you shake the tin). Remove from oven, leave to cool. Cut into squares then serve.

Please note the baking time will always vary depending on the tin you use, the thickness of your cake and the oven. Brownies are quite forgiving if you cook them on lower heat for a longer time – keep checking the edges and just make sure you don’t over bake it. Its nicer with a slightly under baked brownie rather than over baked, so take it out a bit before rather than give it that extra few minutes.

Recipe: Flødeboller mallow fluff cakes

February 12, 2015 | 1 Comment

A recipe for ‘Flødeboller’ mallow fluff cakes at home.

Ahhh… Do you like snowballs and mallow tea cakes? Soft, mallow with chocolate coating? Then you’ll like these.

In Scandinavia, usually called ‘Flødeboller’ or ‘Gammeldags kokosbollar’, these are often made with or without a base, with light or dark chocolate, and various flavoured fillings. In recent years, a lot of konditors have started making gourmet versions – and people have followed suit at home, coming up with great creations.

Okay, so it probably isn’t the easiest thing to make at home. It’s also a bit messy. However, it is fun and it is really worth it.

We recommend you do use a base for these. Some people like to use small round wafers, others simply use store bought round short bread type biscuits (look for something approx. 5cm in diameter or smaller). I quite like the ones with a soft baked marzipan cake base, as long as they are baked quite fine and these are the ones in this recipe. But by all means, skip the base-step and buy whatever you prefer – tuiles and round wafers work particularly well.

Do make sure you have both liquid glucose as well as a digital thermometer for the filling, as you need an accurate temperature check. Also, you can’t do this by hand: you need a mixer with a whisk attachment.

Homemade ‘Flødeboller’ mallow tea cakes

Recipe: Flødeboller mallow fluff cakes
Prep time
Cook time
Total time
Delicious Danish 'Flødeboller' mallow fluff cakes
Recipe type: Fika
Cuisine: Danish
Serves: 15-20
  • Bases
  • 200g packet of ‘Mandelmassa’ marzipan 50%
  • 50g icing sugar
  • 40g egg white (approx. one egg white from a large egg – if using smaller eggs, weigh them)
  • Mallow filling
  • 75g liquid glucose
  • 150g sugar
  • 50ml water
  • 1 tsp lemon juice
  • Seeds from one vanilla pod
  • 100g egg white (3 and a bit egg whites – but do weigh them)
  • 1 tbsp caster sugar
  • Pinch of salt
  • Chocolate coating
  • 200g tempered chocolate of choice (I use 70% Valrhona, but a milk chocolate will also give a lovely and lighter result and is preferred by little people).
  • Optional: 1 tbsp vegetable oil
  1. Bases:
  2. In a mixer, blend marzipan, icing sugar and egg white until you have a smooth mass.
  3. Turn the oven to 180 degrees and line a baking tray with parchment.
  4. You can either pipe out 16-18 dollops of marzipan and flatten them into round even discs using some icing sugar to ensure it doesn’t stick to your fingers – or you can use icing sugar and roll them, then flatten them into shape. Make sure the discs are even and not too thick (they will puff up slightly during baking).
  5. Bake for about 10 minutes or until golden. Leave to cool completely. These will remain slightly soft in the middle.
  6. Mallow:
  7. In a saucepan, bring sugar, glucose, water, lemon and vanilla to the boil. Using a thermometer, keep boiling until you reach 117-118 degrees. Be aware any less than this and your syrup will not set the right way and it will affect the result as the water will not have evaporated properly.
  8. Meanwhile, get your mixer ready and lightly whisk the egg white with salt until they start to combine, then add sugar and keep whisking. Increase speed to high and start adding the syrup in a very, very thin stream. Once combined, leave the mixer on high for 8-10 minutes. It does take this long to get the thick, peaky mallow.
  9. Prepare a piping bag with a star nozzle. Add the mallow filling and carefully pipe out mallow on each base, taking care to leave a bit of ‘edge’ free and they may sink slightly. Aim to have a good high top on each mallow. Leave the set for 5-6 hours or speed up the process by popping them in the fridge.
  10. Chocolate coating
  11. Tempering chocolate: If you are a dab hand at tempering chocolate, prepare it in your usual manner. If you are not sure about tempering, melt half the chocolate and then as soon as you have a hot liquid, add the other half and take off the heat and stir until completely melted.
  12. You can also simply melt a chocolate covering or cheaper chocolate, although it might discolour slightly and not dry properly. It will still taste nice, so don’t panic if you are not sure how to temper chocolate. Top tip: Add a small bit of vegetable oil to the hot chocolate if you wish a thinner coating of chocolate on your mallow buns.
  13. Place a mallow bun on a baking grid, just over a bowl. Using a spoon, pour over chocolate until coated, then move with a spatula to a different tray to dry. Repeat until done. You may have to pour excess chocolate back from drip bowl.
  14. Decorate with freeze dried raspberries or sprinkles – or maybe add desiccated coconut for that snowball effect.

Payment types accepted
Secure Shopping with
Free shipping on orders over £60
£0.000 items