Tag Archives: 17 mai

Recipe: Bløtekake – Norwegian Celebration Cake

May 10, 2018 | Leave a comment

Recipe: Bløtekake - Norwegian Celebration Cake

‘Bløtekake’ (also ‘Bløtkake’) literally means soft cake – and is Norway’s version of a Victoria sponge. The difference is that a Bløtekake is lighter – as it is traditionally made with a fat free sponge, ie. a type of Genoise sponge.

Layered with seasonal berries or fruit and whipped cream it is a traditional celebration cake in Norway – enjoyed for any occasion from birthdays to weddings, anniversaries and leaving parties. Easy to tweak to your preferences and great to look at. Ticks all the boxes in our book! You can use any sponge cake recipe you like – this is the one Martina’s Norwegian mormor (maternal grandmother) has been using forever. The mix of regular flour and potato flour makes for an extra tender crumb.

You will need for the cake:

  • 4 eggs
  • 175g caster sugar
  • 60g flour
  • 60g potato flour (we use this one)
  • 1 ts baking powder

For the filling / assembly:

  • 50-100ml milk or orange juice
  • 300 ml whipping cream
  • 1 heaped teaspoon vanilla sugar (like this one)
  • 400g fresh berries and fruit of your choice (use whatever is in season – a mix of strawberries and raspberries is good, and some like sliced fresh banana in the middle, too)
  • Optional: 100ml of your favourite jam

Method:
Whisk eggs and sugar until pale, light and fluffy – we recommend a hand mixer for this – 5-10 minutes. Mix your flours and baking powder and sift into the egg mixture, then fold carefully to combine. Try not to lose the volume you got from the frantic whisking.

Pour into a well buttered cake mould with loose base covered in baking parchment.
Bake at 190-200 degrees for 30 minutes until cooked through. Leave to cool for 10 minuted before removing the mould. Let cool completely before using.

Assembly:
Slice your cake into two or three layers using a long serrated knife (or whatever works for you – just be careful to do it evenly all the way through). Splash each layer with a few tablespoonfuls of milk or orange juice to keep them moist and lovely.

Whip your cream with the vanilla sugar until soft peaks form – then, using manual labour, whip it for another 10-20 seconds until stiff enough to hold its shape. It is easy to overdo it with a mixer so we like using doing it by hand to finish. Rinse and prepare your fruit / berries and have ready in a bowl.

Place your bottom layer on your serving platter / cake stand and place strips of parchment paper all the way around, covering the plate. With a spatula, spread 1/4 of the whipped cream evenly across the cake (1/3 if only two layers). If using jam, dollop this evenly across the cream. Spread 1/3 of your fruit/berries over the top in an even layer. Repeat with the next layer, if your cake is 3 layers. If only two layers, proceed to the next step.

Place your final layer on top of the cream/jam/berry and try to align it neatly so it is not leaning that way or the other. Cover the top of the cake with the rest of the cream – covering the sides if you like. Arrange the remaining fresh fruit / berries across the top any way you like. Any extra ones can be dotted around the serving plate. When you have finished with the cream and berries, carefully remove the parchment paper to reveal the clean plate.

Best eaten immediately.

17. Mai – What – Why – How?

May 12, 2016 | 1 Comment

How to 17.Mai like a Norwegian

17th of May what?

17th of May is the National Day of Norway and celebrates the day Norway got its own constitution, in 1814. It is a day where Norwegians parade around wearing woollen dresses and wave flags whilst eating hot dogs and ice cream.

Why is it such a big deal?

From early 1400s to 1814, Norway was in a union with Denmark where the Danes had most of the say (this period is often referred to as the 400-year night in Norway). In 1814, following the loss of the Napoleon war (King of Denmark was allied with Napoleon)  Norway was taken from Denmark and gifted to Sweden. This union lasted until 1905.

In other words, Norway is a historically young country and the national day is celebrated greatly across the country. It’s a big deal – and Norwegians are generally very patriotic.

So.. How do I celebrate it?

What to wear:

  1. You need a bunad. If you haven’t got one, your finest suit or dress is also acceptable – especially if you go with the Norwegian colour-scheme of red, white and blue. At the very least, pop a ribbon on yourself.
    17 mai bunader
  2. Norwegian flag. Get yourself a Norwegian hand-waving flag and wave it all day. Swap arms if you get tired, place it in your pocket or bag if you absolutely cannot wave any more – but remember – the flag must never ever point downwards (treason!).
    17mai parade norway

What to do and eat:

  1. Wake up at the crack of dawn, out on your bunad and have a lovely champagne breakfast with friends and family. Scrambled eggs, salmon, sour cream porridge, cured ham, strawberries and at least one cake plus bubbles is the least you can expect (sounds nice? Join our brunch in Southwark Park on Tuesday!)
    17. mai frokost breakfast
  2. Say ‘Gratulerer med dagen‘ (congratulations) to everyone.
  3. Practice your straight back and patriotic face for all the singing of ‘ Ja vi elsker’.
  4. (Have children? Buy them an expensive balloon and tie it around their wrist. Do not be surprised when you see it travel up, up, up and away in ten minutes. Yep – that’s £5 gone and your little one crying.)
  5. Eat ice cream. And hot dogs (pølse).
    17 mai polse og is softis

 

Gratulerer med dagen!

Fancy joining us for brunch in Southwark Park (London) this Tuesday? Pre-booking only – for bubbles and a lovely spread of freshly made 17. mai treats. 

    Norwegian Snack Bundle – 17. Mai Special
    £29.99

If you have any questions do give us a call on 0207 998 3199 or email shop@scandikitchen.co.uk and we’ll be happy to help.

Kransekage / Kransekake – the traditional Nordic celebration cake

August 21, 2013 | 1 Comment

Kransekage / Kransekake literally means ‘ring cake’. It’s a traditional Norwegian and Danish celebration cake (Weddings, Christenings, New Year’s Eve and National Days… ) made from baked marzipan, shaped into rings and then stacked as high as
required. It’s very rich so not much is needed (it’s usually served at the Coffee course – a bit as a petit four).

As you can imagine, a real kransekage is made from pure almond paste (nothing like the cheap stuff used for normal cake decorating). It’s a hard cake to make, taking many hours of shaping, baking and decorating.

We don’t make these at Scandikitchen – but we get asked about these cakes a lot and we recommend our good friend Karen from Karen’s Kitchen.

You can contact Karen’s Kitchen by sending her an e-mail. – karenskitchen2@yahoo.co.uk.

She’s very nice and super skilled in this department. In fact, she makes great cakes for all occasions. Tell her we said ‘Hi’.

If you’re thinking of making your own, this is the type of marzipan you need to make the real deal: Click here to buy Odense 60% ‘ren rå’ marzipan 

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