Tag Archives: 17 mai

17. Mai – What – Why – How?

May 12, 2016 | 1 Comment

How to 17.Mai like a Norwegian

17th of May what?

17th of May is the National Day of Norway and celebrates the day Norway got its own constitution, in 1814. It is a day where Norwegians parade around wearing woollen dresses and wave flags whilst eating hot dogs and ice cream.

Why is it such a big deal?

From early 1400s to 1814, Norway was in a union with Denmark where the Danes had most of the say (this period is often referred to as the 400-year night in Norway). In 1814, following the loss of the Napoleon war (King of Denmark was allied with Napoleon)  Norway was taken from Denmark and gifted to Sweden. This union lasted until 1905.

In other words, Norway is a historically young country and the national day is celebrated greatly across the country. It’s a big deal – and Norwegians are generally very patriotic.

So.. How do I celebrate it?

What to wear:

  1. You need a bunad. If you haven’t got one, your finest suit or dress is also acceptable – especially if you go with the Norwegian colour-scheme of red, white and blue. At the very least, pop a ribbon on yourself.
    17 mai bunader
  2. Norwegian flag. Get yourself a Norwegian hand-waving flag and wave it all day. Swap arms if you get tired, place it in your pocket or bag if you absolutely cannot wave any more – but remember – the flag must never ever point downwards (treason!).
    17mai parade norway

What to do and eat:

  1. Wake up at the crack of dawn, out on your bunad and have a lovely champagne breakfast with friends and family. Scrambled eggs, salmon, sour cream porridge, cured ham, strawberries and at least one cake plus bubbles is the least you can expect (sounds nice? Join our brunch in Southwark Park on Tuesday!)
    17. mai frokost breakfast
  2. Say ‘Gratulerer med dagen‘ (congratulations) to everyone.
  3. Practice your straight back and patriotic face for all the singing of ‘ Ja vi elsker’.
  4. (Have children? Buy them an expensive balloon and tie it around their wrist. Do not be surprised when you see it travel up, up, up and away in ten minutes. Yep – that’s £5 gone and your little one crying.)
  5. Eat ice cream. And hot dogs (pølse).
    17 mai polse og is softis


Gratulerer med dagen!

Fancy joining us for brunch in Southwark Park (London) this Tuesday? Pre-booking only – for bubbles and a lovely spread of freshly made 17. mai treats. 

    17th May Brunch & Bubbles in Southwark Park

If you have any questions do give us a call on 0207 998 3199 or email shop@scandikitchen.co.uk and we’ll be happy to help.

Kransekage / Kransekake – the traditional Nordic celebration cake

August 21, 2013 | 1 Comment

Kransekage / Kransekake literally means ‘ring cake’. It’s a traditional Norwegian and Danish celebration cake (Weddings, Christenings, New Year’s Eve and National Days… ) made from baked marzipan, shaped into rings and then stacked as high as
required. It’s very rich so not much is needed (it’s usually served at the Coffee course – a bit as a petit four).

As you can imagine, a real kransekage is made from pure almond paste (nothing like the cheap stuff used for normal cake decorating). It’s a hard cake to make, taking many hours of shaping, baking and decorating.

We don’t make these at Scandikitchen – but we get asked about these cakes a lot and we recommend our good friend Karen from Karen’s Kitchen.

You can contact Karen’s Kitchen by sending her an e-mail. – karenskitchen2@yahoo.co.uk.

She’s very nice and super skilled in this department. In fact, she makes great cakes for all occasions. Tell her we said ‘Hi’.

If you’re thinking of making your own, this is the type of marzipan you need to make the real deal: Click here to buy Odense 60% ‘ren rå’ marzipan 

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